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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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Opening' / 
current events 26 

academics 3^ 

0r^ani:sati0ns 76 

student life 130 

sports 178 

seniors 2S0 

benefactors ^66 

closing' ^82 




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http://www.archive.org/details/subturriundertow2005bost 




Boston College 

McElroy Commons 103 

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 

(617)552'3493 

subturri@bc.edu 

~ Volume XCIII ; 

© Myra Chai and Marisa Fusco 



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BOSTON COLLEGE 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Dear Members of the Class of 2005: 

Four years ago your class enrolled at Boston College. You have witnessed the 
terrorist attacks of September 11, the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church, 
corporate corruption, and war in Iraq. During the past four years, I hope your Boston 
College education has prepared you not simply to develop your talents, but also to help 
solve the challenges of today's complex, global society. 

On behalf of the Boston College community, I thank you for the energy, 
commitment, anci idealism that you brought to our campus. Your dreams and 
aspirations have affected Boston College in so many ways, and your courses, 
friendships, and activities have enabled you not only to identify and nurture your gifts, 
but also to grow intellectually, spiritually, and socially. Since our founding in 1863, 
Boston College has helped its students develop broader perspectives, deepen their 
awareness of critical issues in wider society, and prepare for life after college. 

1 encourage you members of the Class of 2005 to use your abilities for the greater 
glory of God and in service of others, especially the poor and disadvantaged. Our world 
needs people like you who have vision, hope, and creativity. My prayer is that you will 
continue to draw strength and inspiration from what you have learned at "the Heights" 
and from one another. May your lives be marked by faith, integrity, and compassion, 
and may God always be with you in the years ahead. 

Sincerely, 

William P. Leahy, S.J. 
President 




Oppi-iing 



The Foundations of 
BOSTON COLLEGE 



For any student who has stepped 
onto the Boston College cam- 
pus it is hard to imagine that 
more than ninety-two years ago this 
campus never existed. Originally 
located on Harrison Avenue in the 
South End of Boston, the limited 
space no longer accommodated the 
needs of the previous fifty years of 
the university so a new location in 
Chestnut Hill was selected and ac- 
quired in 1907. This move was the 
work of Rev. Thomas Ignatius Gas- 
son, S.J., the thirteenth president of 
Boston College, and the namesake of 
the campus' first and most prominent 
building. Boston College was found- 
ed by the Society of Jesus in 1863 
and began with little more than three 
teachers and twenty-two students. In 
1941, however, the school underwent 
further expansion as the upper cam- 
pus was added and later the lower 
campus in 1949. Then again in 1974 
BC acquired Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart, which later became 
the site of the Boston College Law 
School and dormitories for freshmen. 

The first president and founder 
of Boston College, Father 
John McElroy, S.J., had as his 
mission the dream to spread the no- 
tion of service for others that exists 
to this day. With hundreds of groups 
that tailor to each students needs it 
is important to remember the foun- 



dations of the school, the work and 
dedication of those who came before. 
Within these next few pages, a brief 
history of the school hopes to reflect 
a side of the university that is not em- 
phasized as much as it should be, but 
is essential to what the school has be- 
come today. Looking at the Dustbowl 
today, would anyone believe that the 
football team used to practice there 
and that what is today a serene and 
spacious lawn with trees dotting the 
ground used to be aii open expanse 
that sports teams used for practice 
and games? Would anyone walking 
through the mods believe that at 
one point, before the coiistruction of 
Alumni stadium, students and faculty 
could see the bleachers, track and 
football field from the ground level? 
Or that before the computer age stu- 
dents had to wake up at early hours of 
the morning and wait in line for hours 
just to register for courses? A lot has 
changed at Boston College and yet 
many things have stayed the same. 
The energy at a football game and 
being tossed in the air after a touch- 
down, the long and indecisive prepa- 
ration before a party, the long hours 
before a press deadline, the sleeping 
bodies in the library. The school has 
become bigger in maiiy ways but it 
retains at its core its sense of com- 
munity, its dedication for others, and 
a desire ever to excel, hiyra Chai 




O pen in g 



A History of 
ACADEMICS 




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1913: Founder ot the Chestnut Hill campus, Thomas Ignatius Gasson, SJ. 1963: Students line up in the early hours of the morning to register for courses. 




19M: bmiling tor the camera bctorc the professor arrives. 



1979: Some things never change. 



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1913: The first graduating clas^ ot the CJliesnut Hill campus. 



"With the completion of the first building at University 
Heights the expansion is bound to be rapid and exten- 
sive- On that artistic eminence is reared a new cita- 
del of learning, a monument to the cause of Catholic 
education- Here the sons of Catholic parents will learn 
the lessons that will make them better men and better 
citizens, proud of their faith and proud of their country." 

From the Opening of the first edition of Sub Turri, 1913 



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A History of 
STUDENT LIFE 





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1963: A tu<^ v<<iii{A:ti(iui> AUli iiu luiii>L. 



19tt3; TciilgatiiiiL; in true UC la^liiuii. 



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1939: A glamorous night on tlie Heights. 



"In remembering the proms, the Under-the-Tower Dances, 
the "Pops", those heated discussions in the Fulton, those 
jolly conferences in the cafeteria and the nights spent over 
fraternal cups, we cannot but feel a glow of pleasant recol- 
lections. [...] To B.C., we owe those happy memories of com- 
panionship, of clean joviality and true religious inspiration.'' 

From the Class History of Sub Turri, 1944 



A History of 
ORGANIZATIONS 




1976: Club» SCI oui tables to publicin; to studc 




1976: A group of The Heights writers have some tun. 



''When Boston College first came into existence the necessity 
of extracurricular activity was immediately evident- The wel- 
fare of the students' spiritual being was the first consideration, 
and brought about the birth of the Sodality. [...] As the college 
grows so grows the list of Academics and Clubs. When the Col- 
lege establishes a new course we generally find a new academy." 

From the Organizations Introduction of Suh Turri, 1939 



OpeniiT' -3 



A History of 
SPORTS 




1984: Doug Flutie sealed his place in histon* with his Hail Mary. 



1970: The BC baseball team practicing in front of Gasson. 




1976: Football practice in what Ls now the Dustbi)wl 



I4K5: The woincns ice hockey tcsiiii 




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1976: Bcturt: lKc Lon^iiLKUuii \A .XiLiiuni ^taJiufii, rhc [laLk anJ tL'v_itball IieLl coulJ be .>cLii Jiicctls hoiu the Plcx. 



"After completing 2 of 3 to the Miami 48, Flutie had 
only :06 remaining on the clock. Enter once more the 
magic. It was a pass which was seen by most of the 
nation, and it skyrocketed Flutie into fame and made 
believers of all. [...] There was no way to describe it in 
words. Flutie had done the impossible... once again." 

From the Football spread ofSuh Turri, 1985 



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GURRENT EVENTS 

Edited By: 
MyraChal 




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/^ ""X^ /'^'l' ummarizing the year in a concise and 

I % / ^ accurate manner would he a daunting 

^^— "'^^--^ task. How to capture the grief of loss and 
destruction, the suspense of election and awards results, the 
joy of new beginnings and hope for the future in a pithy 
statement? Both the summer and year ended in tragedy as 
natural disasters attacked countries around the world. It 
lost stars and leaders of both old and new, yet there was 
acknowledgement that their work had not been lost, they had 
worked for what they always believed in. The 2004 Election 
lived up to the hype created by the press and Hollywood 
and the country held its breath as the results came down 
to Ohio. Throughout it all though, people united in a way 
this world has not seen in many years. They united for 
three weeks during the Athens Olympics. They united in 
grief and sympathy for uncountable losses and they signed 
peace treaties. They returned to their television sets and 
movie cinemas to watch housewives defy their stereotypical 
boundaries, to watch a cast of "dynamite" nerds defy the 
odds, to watch a "cursed" baseball club defy history. In short, 
they witnessed unprecedented sadness yet found a way to 
come together to provide a foundation for one another not 
only as citizens of a country but of the world. M}'ra Chai 




August 1 3 - The 2Sth Olympics games in Athens, Greece opened in front of 
a stadium of more than 70,000 spectators. The ceremony mixed the centu- 
ries-old Greek tradition with modern technology that erased any fears that 
the Games would not dazzle. For months the media criticized and ridiculed 
the lack of preparation and progress of the Athens team. Despite moments 
of controversy, the Games were quite successful. Photo by Associated Press 



November 12 - Amid chaotic and highly emotional mourners, Pal- 
estinian leader Yasser Arafat was buried at the Ramallah compound 
where Israel confined him for years. The 75-year-old Arafat died in a 
Paris hospital after suffering a brain hemorrhage and coma. Thousands 
of wailing and cheering Palestinians entered the compound walls and 
swarmed a helicopter that was bearing his casket. Photo by Associated Press 




January 9 - After 21 years of bitter and violent civil war between 
Sudan's government and the southern rebel Sudan People's Liberation 
Movement/Army (SPLM/A) a peace accord was signed in Nairobi. 
Amid thanksgiving hymns and the dancing of bare-chested warriors the 
two groups reached an agreement whereby the southern part of Sudan 
would be exempted from Islamic Sharia law. Phoio by Associated Press 



January 25 - BC held a candlelight vigil in O'Neill Plaza to rememl > i 
the victims of the deadly Southeast Asia earthquake and tsunami. The 
highly attended event was powerful In its message and encouraged tun 
forms ot support for those affected: monetary aid as well as prayer and slkni 
remembrance. A Jesuit priest from In^lonesla spoke about the depth 'I 
the disaster while an a capella group pnnided music. Photo by Myra C,/i.ii 



THE WORLD 



Amidst the world tragedy of 2005 a sense of hope for the future emerged from the 
rubble. In the years since the begining of the Iraq war, insurgents used car, suicide 
and roadside bombings to break U.S. and coalition efforts to reconstruct the 
country and institute the nation's first government since the fall of Saddam Hussein's regime. 
Kidnappings and foreign hostage beheadings in Iraq, the March train stations explosions in 
Madrid blamed on al Qaeda, and the Russian elementary school siege by Chechen rebels of the 
previous year rattled the sense of security many had prized so dearly in the past. The causalities, 
among them journalists, soldiers, and innocent civilians, grew by the day. The crisis in Sudan 
continued to rage as millions in the Darfur region were displaced and suffered under the civil 
war. The Athens Olympics, returning to their birth place two hundred and eight years later, 
provided a brief respite from the daily combat and reminded the world once more of the 
importance of unity and why the games had both been created and had lasted all these years. 
For three weeks athletes put aside their differences and dazzled spectators with their stamina, 
skill and grace. The world witnessed and cheered the underdog Afghani men's basketball 
team who made a miraculous run and showed signs of great things to come. This respite was 
not to last, however, as on November Il''\ 2004, after battling months of health problems, 
Yasser Arafat died in a Paris hospital. For decades he had been the symbol of the Palestinian 
cause, a conflicted leader who once promoted peace with Israel yet other times called for an 
independent Palestinian state. The tragedy of 2004 brought hope for peace in the new year, 
but the world watched and stood humbled by nature as a 9.0 earthquake in the Indian Ocean 
gave rise to devastating tsunamis that killed at least 150,000 people from Thailand to Somalia 
and left still hundreds of thousands more without homes, food, fresh water or power. And yet 
in the days, weeks, and months following the tragedy, while the horror and reality were still 
settling in, overwhelming support poured in from around the world. The United Nations urged 
donor countries to contribute money and, more importantly, materials. Through televised 
benefit concerts and fundraisers ranging from the big to the small the world united through 
love. Less than a week later, on January 9'^, 2005, after nearly three years of negotiations, 
Sudan's government and main rebel group signed the Sudanese Peace Protocol to end the more 
than 21 years of civil war. The country began to open up, money slowly poured in and the 
accord marked the beginning of the first true shift of power towards a more equitable scenario. 
Pope John Paul's health declined in February, prompting talks of the next possible successor. 
And finally, while many mourned his passing, others saw Arafat's death as an opportunity for 
Palestinians and Israelis to finally start anew their attempts towards a lasting peace. So the 
New Year brought hope, hope for prosperity, hope for peace, hope for the world. Myra Chai 



niirrenr F.venrs 29 




October - The US lost almost half of its expected 1 00 million doses of the flu 
vaccine, which prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to 
recommend that doses of the vaccine be restricted to high-risk groups only. 
Due to a mild flu season, the demand for the country's "limited doses" 
of the vaccine was less than anticipated and the demand for them 
generated long pharmacy lines and waits everywhere. Photo by SAVl 



November - The 2004 Bush/Kerry Presidential Election certainly did its 
part in dividing those along opposing party lines. In the months leading up 
to the election, Democratic and Republican citizens did their part to spread 
the word. In the wee hours of November 2nd, anxious supporters waited for 
news on Ohio's polling results as the future of the next president remained 
in the air before the final count was released. Photo by Associated Prc<- 




January - Obesity came to the forefront of news in the media as the 
government acknowledged that the issue had to be addressed and rem- 
edied. It has been connected to several health issues and has led to the 
first upheaval of the food pyramid since its creation 12 years ago. The 
government released new health guidelines on January 12 thar enipha- 
si2ed both exercise and more fruits and vegetables. Photo by Myra Chai 



January-February - Snowstorms dumped more than 51 inches of snuw 
across the East Coast within the first few weeks of the new year. The 
previous half year had brought unusual and dangerous weather occur- 
rences, ranging from the destructive summer Florida hurricanes to the 
winter snow showers in typically warmer regions of the country, such 
as Texas ani.1 even regions of rhc Hawaii islands. Photo /7\ Bob McGrath 



[\ 



THE NATION 



On June 5''\ 2004, the Americans bid farewell to former President Rt)nald Reagan, 
who died nearly 10 years after announcing that he was suffering from Alzheimer's 
disease. For a week the nation mourned the loss of the conservative revolutionary 
who helped to bring about the end of the Cold War, and yet also reflected on the war it found 
itself in at the moment. By late summer, several major storms had hit Florida, the East Coast 
and the Caribbean, inflicting irreparable damage in many cases. Crops and houses were 
destroyed and Americans worked fast to rebuild their lives. The election of 2004, only a 
couple of months later, will most likely be remembered more for the zeal and passion of the 
voters than for its eventual result. For months and years the Democrats attempted to secure 
a viable candidate and innumerable Americans fought hard to deny re-election to the man 
they believed had for the last four years ruined the economic, social, and political state of the 
nation. In what ended in the largest voter turnout since 1968, President George W. Bush 
beat Democratic hopeful, John Kerry, to secure a second consecutive term in office. The 
election, which came down to Ohio, further tipped the balance of power as the government 
prepared for a new foundation built on the influence of Republicans. Months after 
Massachusetts' first legal same-sex marriages, voters in 1 1 states backed referendums making 
it illegal. Shortly afterwards, amidst the shocking Cabinet turnover in which Secretary of 
State Colin Powell and three other members resigned and left room for Bush to create a new 
power base to advise him, a flu vaccine shortage plagued the nation. The underestimated 
demand of the vaccine left thousands without it and created a minor scare throughout the 
country as Americans raced to pharmacies and their doctors to guard their health. The 
national and international health organizations began to release statistics citing Americans 
as the fattest people on Earth and called for changes in the food pyramid accepted for the 12 
years since it had been implemented. The US government and that of specific states, such 
as Califoniia, started off the new year by taking an active role in promoting good health by 
eliminating snack machines, soda machines, and encouraging daily physical activity. On 
January 12''\ NASA launched its new Deep Impact spacecraft into the air in the hopes 
of touching the nucleus of a comet and finding out more of what the comet was made of 
This marked the first time a spacecraft was built intended to touch a comet and provided 
the building blocks for further understanding of the solar system. Even the early year East 
Coast blizzard brought promises ot renewal as the snow seemed to cover all the stains of 
the previous months. And so while the US struggled with setbacks throughout 2004, the 
beginning months of the new year laid the groundwork for success in 2005. Myra Chai 



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Summer 2004 - It there's one thing America learned this summer it's 
that "girls only want boyfriends who have great skills. You know, like 
numchuk skills, bow hunting skills, computer hacking skills." Napoleon 
Dynamite fever swept the nation and the box office with catchy lines and 
an unbelievable realization - nerdy humor that was actually cool and funny. 
XX'hich begs the question: Will you vote for Pedro? Photo by Michael Kim 




October 8 - Domestic diva Martha Stewart made a name for herself years 
ago by teaching Americans the best way to decorate the house, the best 
way to prepare a meal, and the best way to live, Marta-style. But she made 
a name for herself as well when she was convicted of insider trading in 
the sale of ImClone Systems stock. She served a 5-month sentence at the 
Alderson Federal Prison Camp in West Virginia. Photo by Associated Press 




October 26 - The Red Sox, after an 86 year-old curse officially became 2004 
World Series Champions. Shocked Bostonians and college students poured 
out onto the streets near Fenway to celebrate the 3-0 deficit to the Yankees 
and later again when the Sox swept the St. Louis Cardinals. Millions more 
joined the streets when the team came home for their parade. The parade 
route was expanded to accommodate for the projected high traffic and the 
duck boats even made an appearance in the Charles. Photo by Myra Chai 



THE 

RAMMj 

AWARDS 


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February 13 - Although vicwcrship was lower than it had been in many] 
years the Grammys nonetheless provided some entertainment during the 
awards season. The late Ray Charles stole the show with six Grammys, 
including Album of the Year for "Genius Loves Company," while Green | 
Day and Kanye West won Best Album for their respective categories. Rock I 
and Rap &. Hip-Hip. Green Day's "American Idiot" convinced critics 
that it was not just another 90's one-hit wonder. Photo by Associated Prcsi 



ENTERTAINMENT 



In the world of sports and entertainment, as in life, all things must come to an end. And 
still other times things end before they even begin. Britney Spears married her friend 
in Las Vegas then annulled it before the next day had begun. And yet only months 
later there she was again exchanging vows. Before the whole Bennifer scandal had time to 
subside, Jennifer Lopez had already married Marc Anthony. The passings of Marlon Brando, 
Ray Charles, Christopher Reeve, and, Johnny Carson, among many others, evoked a feeling 
that though their legacy would endure, the older foundations of Hollywood were beginning 
to fade. And so as the entertainment world lost many of its most cherished artists who graced 
the world with their music, acting, artistic talents and activism, it also welcomed a new group 
of celebrity babies as actresses like Debra Messing, Courtney Cox, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Julia 
Roberts all became mothers. On TV as well, 2004-2005 generated an upheaval in the station 
power pyramid. May 2004 saw the finales of staple shows "Friends" and "Frasier" on NBC and 
"Sex and the City" on HBO. While HBO managed to rebound with "Curb Your Enthusiasm" 
and the new "Entourage," NBC struggled against the sudden success of ABC's "Desperate 
Housewives" and "Lost." Summer movies, once dominated by big-budget blockbusters, 
suddenly saw the rise of smaller, low-budget films like "Super Size Me," "Garden State," 
"Fahrenheit 911" and the surprise hit, "Napoleon Dynamite." The Los Angeles Lakers, hated 
by many as much as the New York Yankees, saw the dramatic trade of Shac]uille O'Neal to the 
Miami Heat that give hope to the rest of the league at a chance at the Championship title. 
The fall brought a more obvious transferal of power as Jay Leno announced Conan O'Brien 
as his replacement for The Tonight Show starting in 2009 and when Martha Stewart began 
her 5 -month prison sentence for her part in the ImClone scandal. The Red Sox, plagued for 
86 years by a curse, became the first club in baseball history to rally from a 3-0 series deficit 
against the Yankees to win the American League pennant. Their later sweep of the St. Louis 
Cardinals to win the World Series fulfilled the promise of a David and Goliath ending for 
the generations of fans throughout the country who always believed in their team. Others, 
however, found such loving support hard to come by. Ashley Simpson, younger sister of the 
"Newlyweds" star Jessica Simpson, learned the hard way that lip synching does not pay off 
when she was caught red handed during a performance on Saturday Night Live. The Golden 
Globes came and went and with it perhaps the beginning of great things for Jamie Foxx. The 
triple-nominated actor tearfully accepted his Best Actor award for "Ray" and again during 
the 77th Academy Awards. For all the ambition of "The Aviator," it was "Million Dollar 
Baby" that came up big at the Chris Rock hosted show, winning the Best Actress, Best 
Director, and Best Film categories. It can be said that the year had its downs and its losses, 
but with them came newer foundations to build on to bring us into a new era. Myra Chai 



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AC ad: 

Edited By: 
KathleenAhearn 
CarolynDorazio 




oston College is home to over 8,900 un- 
dergraduate students and offers more 
than fifty programs in its five under- 
graduate schools. Entering this type of prestigious institution as a 
freshman could be a ciaunting task to say the very least. However, 
with its strong Jesuit ideals and the goal of uniting high academic 
achievement with service to others, Boston College immediately 
makes each of its students feel at home. Special academic programs 
work as supplements to the University Core, which gives students 
a unique liberal arts education during which they are free to shape 
their own academic experience. No longer overwhelmed by the 
University, sophomores begin to pursue a major specific to their 
interests and abilities. With the tirm roots given to them during 
their first two years at college, juniors have the opportunity to study 
abroad or stay at BC to expand their academic horizons. As senior 
year comes and goes, students continue to face new academic chal- 
lenges as well as manage familiar ones. Four years ot academic 
success at Boston College does not, however, end our career as stu- 
dents. We have learned from our time here that these tour years 
were simply a foundation for the learning that will continue for the 
rest of our lives. Marisa Fusco 









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The Foundations of 

JESUIT TRADITION 



Today Boston College is one of 28 
Jesuit Colleges and Universities 
throughout the United States, 
and one of hundreds of higher learning 
institutes throughout the world. Each of 
these schools was founded on strong Jesuit 
principles, Boston College not withstanding. 
In 1863, Boston College was founded 
in the South End of Boston, Massachusetts 
by a group of Jesuits, erecting a church 
that still stands today on what was the 
original campus. At that point it was the 
eleventh Jesuit University in the country. 
As the university began to grow, the 
founders decided to purchase a large farm 
in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts and begin 
construction of what is known as the main 
Chestnut Hill campus today. The buildings 
on this campus are the first evidence of 
Jesuit tradition that flourishes throughout 
Boston College. The main building on 
campus, Gasson Hall, which is home to 
the university first school, the College of 
Arts & Sciences, was built in its present 
location with stones from buildings from the 
original campus. This building along with 
several of the other buildings throughout 
campus was constructed in a style known as 
collegiate gothic; a style strongly associated 
with church buildings, and created in an 
age where religion and education were very 
closely tied. Boston College has made great 
efforts to maintain those values instilled by 
the schools founders so many generations ago. 



As a Jesuit university, Boston College 
adheres as best it can to the goals of St. 
Ignatius of Loyola, the original creator of the 
Society of Jesus and of the first Jesuit order; 
his mission was to make the Gospel a reality 
in his own time and place. He taught the 
first Jesuits the most methodical teaching 
methods; insisting that students not only 
master the curriculum but to take the 
material that they learned and incorporate 
it into their daily lives, encouraging their 
growth as human beings. According to 
Ignatius, a well-rounded education was 
essential to personal growth, and students 
were to be educated in a multitude of fields 
encompassing everything from biology to 
theology. As a liberal arts school, Boston 
College still insists that all students 
complete a multitude of core requirements 
to ensure that every student who passes 
through the university has been given 
the widest variety of knowledge possible. 

Boston College like all Jesuit 
institutions is founded on the spiritual 
values that are the heart and soul of the 
Jesuit belief system; and the manner in 
which they believe education should be 
taught everywhere. What was originally a 
profoundly Christian school is now enriched 
by a variety of religious traditions, with a 
hope that all members of the Boston College 
community will adapt what is helpful to 
their own religious and ethical convictions. 
Kathleen Ahearn. 



College OF 




The College of Arts &. Sciences, founded by the Society of Jesus in 1863, was the 
first of what would become five schools under the umbrella of Boston College. 
The school opened its doors with only three professors and twenty- two students. 
For its first seventy years the College was exclusively liberal arts with an emphasis 
on the Greek and Latin classics, English and modern languages, philosophy and 
religion. Today about 6,000 students are enrolled at the undergraduate level. Its core 
curriculum is required for all undergraduates, providing students with knowledge 
from a diverse field of studies, regardless ot their chosen area of conccntnition. 
With 31 majors, various departmental and disciplinary minors, and nimunms 
electives, it allows students to personalize tiuir cJucmions to tii their indi\ iJuil 



Arts & Sciences 




needs. The courses in the school are essential to the development of each 
student. The goal of the curriculum is to produce well-rounded adults who are 
prepared for further academic study, community service, and the professional 
realm following graduation. The College is based on the university's mission, 
emphasizing "a recognition of the important contribution a diverse student 
body, faculty and staff can offer, with a firm commitment to academic 
freedom, and with a determination to exercise careful stewardship of its 
resources in pursuit of its academic goals." Samantha Fontellio. 



AraHemirs 




' ;.•,.". :.;^ ir,, in upper Ictt: A student reads die newspaper in die 

quad, Gasson Hall, a student hard at work, the cornerstone of 
Gasson Hall, the clock on Gasson Hall. Bob McQrath. 



T^ducadon, in the broadest of truest 
JL^ sensej will make an individual 
seek to help all people^ regardless of 
raeej regardless of color ^ regardless of 
condition, 

-George Washington Carver 




A atudciu wulkiiiu (u claM>. Bub ML'(/ru(b. 




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A student writing outside. Bob Mc(Jrath 



Dean Joseph F. Quini-i 
College of Arts &. Sciences 

Dear Members of the Class of 2005, 

Change and transition. The letter I received from the Office of 
Undergraduate Admission profiling the great incoming Class of 2005, the 
most talented class to date, is dated September 4, 2001. Who knew what 
was only a week away? 

You have witnessed a world changed in fundamental ways. I hope that 
you have changed as well during these past four years. Half of you entered 
Boston College without a declared major, and many of those with a major 
changed it, some more than once. You may have altered your career plans, 
and may well do so again. 

What has not changed is the philosophy of education at Boston College. 
We believe that educated men and women (for others!) should have both 
breadth and depth in their undergraduate experiences, which we have 
provided through an extensive Core curriculum, various majors and minors, 
and a wonderful array of electives. You have learned to think critically and 
to argue persuasively. You have observed how different disciplines view 
the world and how philosophers, theologians, historians, social and natural 
scientists and artists can contribute to policy debate. You have learned to 
listen to others, to weigh evidence and, 1 hope, to change your mind. 
You will probably have careers, not a single career. To be successful, you 
will continue to learn and to grow. We call your departure from Boston 
College a commencement for a reason -- together, we have started, not 
finished, your education. 

1 hope that you look back fondly on the Boston College faculty, 
administration and staff, those dedicated men and women who have chosen 
your education as their career. We are very proud of you, the work you have 
done and the work you will do. Please remember your favorite teachers and 
mentors. If you are reading this years from 2005, take the time today to 
write or email a friend on campus, and bring him or her up to date on your 
journey. 

You have joined a new family, the more than 140,000 graduates of Boston 
College. The university has prospered because of the dedication of your 
older brothers and sisters. We hope that you will remain engaged in Boston 
College in the years ahead. Go forth, but come back, soon and often. 

Sincerely, 



Aradf 



Joseph F. Quinn 



Carroll School of 




The Carroll School of Management originally known as the College of 
Business Administration, was founded in 1938 by Father James J. Kelley who 
was given full authority to envision and create a four year program leading 
to a degree in business administration. Beginning with a little over one hundred 
applicants, the Carroll School now receives thousands of applications every year. 
The Carroll School of Management was founded on the principle that students 
should be prepared for leadership roles in the classroom, in business and in scKiety. 



Management 




and in society. Its curriculum is broadly based and teaches students the 
fundamental elements of all aspects of business prior to narrowing down 
their focus and specializing in a particular field or industry. The Carroll 
School of Management enables its graduates to reach their fullest potential 
in a world of constant change without losing sight of the Jesuit ideals of 
ethics and morality, upon which the University as a whole is based. 
Jessica Lohoen. 



Arademirs 








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Clockwise from upper left: Students walking to classes, the 

back of Fulton Hall, two students working in the quad, the 

cornerstone of Fulton Hall, two students relaxing outside. 

Andrew Logan (1,3,5). Bob McQrath {2,4). 



J 




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5t/cce55 in business requires i 
training and discipline and hard 
workj hut if you re not frightened of 
these things^ the opportunities are Just : 
as great today as they ever were. 

'David Rockefeller 




Cuiivtiiiiiy uuI:>uIl- IuIuui I I. ill. .ViiJuu l^ijiuii 






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JifcfAjH^yp^t.^ftV- ^ 7 




Dear Graduates ot the Class of 2005, 

On behalf of the faculty and staff of the Boston College Carroll 
School of Management, it is a privilege and pleasure to extend our heartfelt 
congratulations to you. Your graduation from Boston College begins 
one of life's most personal and important transitions. Your years as an 
undergraduate student, with the surprises and challenges you've experienced, 
will give way to your life as a citizen of the world; a life filled with excitement 
and responsibilities that you will enjoy and, we are confident, will lead to 
tremendous personal success. 

Before you apply yourself to what lies ahead, simply stop. Stop for 
several moments to pause, reflect and celebrate. Pause and smell the many 
roses that surround your moment in the sun, your academic success, your 
time immersed within this wonderful bastion of values we know as Boston 
College, your new caring community of life long friends and fellow alumni, 
and your ever supporting family. Take time to reflect on what you've learned 
from the Carroll School's extraordinarily talented faculty and staff about 
how to manage and lead vibrant organizations that will help shape the future 
of our world. And, importantly, reflect on the vivid pallet of ideas found in 
the liberal arts curriculum you've savored. These ideas will enrich your life 
by serving as reminders to always think broadly and carefully about the many 
important decisions you will face. 

Although your years as an undergraduate student have now passed, 
there is a big surprise in store for you. You are not leaving Boston College now 
and you never will. For Boston College is a state of mind. As a Son of Boston 
College myself, your years ahead, like mine, will be most enriched when you 
continually commit your mind and soul to serving others, to learning, always 
learning, and remembering ever to excel. Let Boston College provide you 
strength, insight, and guidance in your years ahead. Make sure you also pause 
to celebrate being bestowed this Degree, recognizing your achievement. See 
it as an invitation to join the supportive and caring family of Boston College 
alumni worldwide. Seize the opportunity. Go out and make good things 
happen for you and the world at large. But remember, come back and visit us 
once in awhile. As someone wrote to my fellow graduates and me on these 
same pages years ago, you are always welcome back to this old pond. We 
salute you ! 

Sincerely, 

Andrew C. Boynton 
Dean 



Students meet out.side FliIidii Hall, Aiidrcu; Lo^mi. 



Lynch School of 




Founded in 1952, the Lynch School ot Education strives to maintain an 
environment surrounded by its mission to "improve the human condition 
through education." With 60 full-time faculty members, over 35 part- 
time faculty members, 60 researchers, 55 professional and administrative staff, 
800 undergraduate students and 1,000 graduate students, the school embraces 
the determination within those striving to make the world better through 
education. Its undergraduate programs are in Early Childhood Education, 
Elementary Education, Secondary Education and Human Development. Within 



Education 




the graduate school, students may study from an array of programs including, hut 
not limited to, school-based programs, university administration and student 
development, counseling, and educational research. The Lynch School of 
Education, composed of students, faculty and academic programs working towards 
the fulfillment of its mission, is an important part of Boston College's institution. 
Its impact is felt whether it he hy the students, through careful guidance, or by the 
community, through outreach programs. Samantha Fontellio. 



Ar.Rd 



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Clockwise trom upper left: A student walking in the dusthowl, 

the entrance to Campion Hall, students walking towards Hig- 

gins Hall, the cornerstone of Campion Hall, students walking 

on a windy day. Andreui Logan (1,3,5). Bob McQrath (2,4). 




I / 



Once children learn how to learn^ 
nothing is going to narrow their 
mind. The essence of teaching is to 
make learning contagious^ to have one 
idea spark another, 

'Marva Collins 




Twu DtuJcnUi chaltmg out^iJc. Aiuirciv Lujfuii. 







Dear Members of the Class of 2005, 

On behalf of the faculty and staff of the Lynch School of 
Education and on my own behalf, I want to congratulate you all as you 
join the ranks of the 140,000 men and women who are proud to call 
Boston College alma mater. For four years, you have blessed this campus 
with your intelligence, your enthusiasm and your goodness. Now you 
have the opportunity to bring to the world the talents that you have 
honed during your undergraduate years. 

During your years as an undergraduate you have enjoyed the 
opportunity of a lifetime. You have engaged in a wide variety of activities 
in the classroom, in laboratories, in the residence halls and in the city. 
Your liberal education has allowed you to explore new ways of thinking 
and you have undoubtedly found new ways of relating to your peers, your 
teachers, and your family. This exploration, which is such a fundamental 
part of the college experience, permitted you to discover more of who you 
are and how you make meaning in your life. It is my hope that you have 
come to appreciate the gifts that God has so lavishly bestowed upon you 
and that you have come to thoughtful decisions about how you want to 
live in the world. 

This is a world that changed a great deal only days after you 
began your college years. The attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, brought a new 
perspective on the challenges that face us beyond the gates of our campus. 
You are members of a generation beginning adult life in uncertain and 
challenging times. But, like previous generations of BC alumni, I have 
no doubt that you will make this world more just and more secure for 
generations to follow. I am confident that you will use your talents and 
your perspectives to make a positive difference. 

For Lynch School students, most of whom spent several months 
in local schools or community agencies as art of their education, we hope 
that you will continue to focus on the needs of children and families 
especially those who are underserved in our society. And for all graduates, 
we have no doubt that you will, each in your chosen field, embody the 
goal of a Jesuit education, which is to be men and women of competence 
and compassion, men and women for others. 

May God bless you this year and for many years to come. 
Sincerely yours, 

JosephM. O'Keefe, S.J. 
Interim Dean 



A student reading in the quad. Andrew Logan. 



Arad 



em ics 



CoNNELL School of 




The Connell School of Nursing was founded in 1947 on the basis of 
Richard Cardinal Gushing 's belief that the archdiocese of Boston should 
accommodate it, seeing that this area was without Catholic institutions 
offering nursing programs. When the school opened, there were thirty- 
five registered nurses enrolled. Today, the program has expanded to include 
Baccalaureate, Masters, Ph.D. and continuing education programs. It is 
ranked in the top fntir percent of more than 600 collegiate schools ot nursing 



Nursing 




in the United States. The mission of the Connell School of Nursing: "to 
prepare professional nurses whose practice reflects a humanistic ethic and 
is scientifically based, technically competent, and highly compassionate," 
deeply corresponds to Cushing's vision of the benefits of a Jesuit education for 
nursing students. The ethic involved in such a curriculum is what makes it 
unique and contributes to the school's ability to generate students who think 
with both their minds and hearts. Samantha Fontellio. 




i.^iv ck\vi<L- from upper left: Students speaking on a bench, 
Gushing Hall, a student focused on her reading, the comer- 
stone of Gushing Hall, a student talking on her cell phone. 
Andrew Logan (1,3,5). Bob McQrath (2,4). 



P espect for the fragility of and 
JL \importancc of an individual life is 
still the mark of an educated man. 

'Norman Cousins 



l":^:'-ll^^r^ 




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Dear William F. Connell SON Graduating Class of 2005: 

Congratulations to all of you on your graduation, and thank you 
for the many contributions you have made to this school dur- 
ing your time here. We are proud of you and know that you will 
make the best use of your talents and your Boston College edu- 
cation to make a real difference for your clients and for health 
care in general. 

You are entering the health care field at a challenging time. 
New technology is changing practice and new systems are being 
developed to provide better care. Recent research has demon- 
strated the crucial role that well-educated nurses play in pro- 
viding safe and effective care. Improved patient outcomes and 
decreased mortality have both been shown to be associated with 
better-educated nurses and adequate nurse staffing. There is a 
shortage of nurses at all levels. Not only do we need more nurses 
at the bedside, but also we need advanced practice nurses to pro- 
vide specialty care and serve as mentors for others. Additionally, 
we need doctorally-prepared nurses to improve nursing practice 
through research and to teach in our nursing programs. We hope 
that many of you will pursue graduate education. 

The rapidly evolving health care system needs you! As graduates 
of the William F. Connell SON, you have been extremely well 
prepared for the current and evolving system. Your program, 
grounded in the liberal arts and in the Jesuit tradition of excel- 
lence in service to others, was designed to produce graduates 
who apply honed critical thinking skills to clinical decision- 
making. You will certainly rise to the challenges and bring the 
Boston College tradition and spirit to all you do. 

May God continue to bless you, your parents, and loved ones, as 
you leave Boston College to commence the next phase of your 
life. 



Sincerely, 



"yyUf^v^r- 



Barbara Hazard Munro, Ph.D., R.A., FAAN 
Dean and Professor 



Busy times in between classes. Andreiv Logan. 



Woods College of 




Celebrating its seventy-fifth anniversary, James A. Woods College of 
Advancing Studies has been dedicated to providing a strong institution 
where students could realize and pursue their life long dreams. Woods 
College of Advancing Studies has offered a place where students could build a 
religious, ethical and personal foundation preparing them tor citizenship, service 



Advancing Studies 




and leadership in a global society. Building its first home on 11 Beacon 
Street, Woods College of Advancing Studies has transformed from providing 
opportunities for solely those who planned on attending law school, to 
providing for all those who wish to expand their particular strengths or 
specialize in varied career objectives. Jessica Lohoen. 



AraHemirs 




»._.iit^K\'. ISC noui f.oy Icit: Two students walk to class, detail of 

McGuinn Hall, students walking between classes, undated 

cornerstone of McGuinn, a true Boston student walks to class. 

Andrew Logan (3,5)- Bob McQrath (1,2,4)- 



Tlie great end of education is to 
discipline rather than to furnish 
the mind; to train it to the use of its 
own powers rather than fill it with the 
accumulation of others. 

'Try on Edwards 




A student cjptunn); campus bcauiy. Ainlnu Liixim. 





,/ 




James A. Woods, S.J. 
College of Advancing Studies 

To the Class of 2005: 

Great joy and accomplishment are yours as you celebrate graduation. 
You have achieved what you dared to dream. The talent, commitment 
and optimism you brought to studies will now be advanced in different 
directions, shared in new ways. 

You face a new world. Unknown challenges now widen your horizons 
and demand a clear sense of mission. This world community invites 
your vision, vitality and vigilant empathy for others. You are prepared 
to question, to seek answers and to respond. You have anchored your 
knowledge, convictions and attitudes in a commitment to others, 
which is the essence of moral engagements. Life's many changes will 
now always be examined in a defined context. You cannot ever leave 
behind what now enlightens your dreams. 

Your imagination and initiative link you today with distant continents 
and disparate cultures. Your talents and many gifts call you to connect 
the world's communities and carve a future of freedom and peace. 
You own the greatest human freedom: to choose your own attitude in 
any given circumstance. To secure your opinions under extreme condi- 
tions when there is no chance of changing them is the highest expres- 
sion of personal autonomy. 

For seventy-six years, graduates of the Woods College of Advancing 
Studies have gone forth into a world of upheaval and advanced the 
noblest human cause: freedom and moral concern for others. Seize 
every opportunity with wisdom and optimism. Make learning a life- 
long goal. Respond to the compelling challenges with understanding 
and enthusiasm. 
Prayerful best wishes for all the years ahead. 

Sincerely yours, 

James A. Woods, S.J. 
Dean 



Students walking back from classes Bob M.cQrath. 



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123 




The Foundations of 

LIBRARIES 



As an institution founded on 
research, Boston College prides 
itself on the accomplishments 
of its students and faculty each year. 
This is evident in the university's 
mission statement: "Boston College is 
dedicated to conducting nationally and 
internationally significant research that 
advances insight and understanding, 
enriches culture, and addresses pressing 
social needs. Through their research 
projects Boston College faculty also 
fosters the intellectual development 
and personal formation of Boston 
College students." A mission like this 
one makes it clear that the fundamental 
responsibility of the school's professors 
is not only to teach, but to research. 
This is the foundation of Boston 
College's intellectual community. 
With over twenty libraries, research 
centers and institutes in total, Boston 
College students and faculty have made 
significant contributions in not only 
scientific research, hut in fields such 
as the exploration of the relationship 
between religion and society, 
improving education, philanthropy, 
and corporate conduct. Boston 

College's libraries and centers offer 
general and specialized collections, 
services, and other resources to support 
teaching, learning, and research. 
Between both the Newton and 



Chestnut Hill campuses the university 
houses four main libraries. O'Neill 
Library, located on main campus, is the 
central research library and houses over 
one million volumes. Bapst Library, also 
on main campus, is the fine arts library and 
has over fifteen hundred volumes, student 
exhibits, and a four hundred-person study 
space. The John J. Burns Library is Boston 
College's library of rare books and special 
collections, housing over one hundred and 
fifty thousand volumes and fifteen million 
manuscripts. The Law Library on Newton 
Campus is home to law school research 
and contains approximately four hundred 
thousand volumes in a variety of forms. 
There are a multitude of research centers 
and specialized libraries on campus as well 
as in the immediate and greater Boston 
area, such as the Education Resource 
Center, the Social Work Library, The 
Media Center allows both students and 
faculty alike access to resources beyond 
their wildest dreams. With such a thirst 
for knowledge and such vast resources 
at their disposal, it is no surprise that 
Boston College is known both nationally 
and internationally for its research 
accomplishments and efforts and it is clear 
that research is one of the universities 
most solid foundations. This allows for the 
university to build upon more and more 
in the passing years. Kathleen Ahearn. 



Registration 



Prior to the start of each semester, all Boston College students engage in 
an age old process of course selection. From analyzing PEPs on ugbc. 
org, arranging the most convenient times, and finding friends who have 
already taken a specific professor, students take it down to the wire to ensure 
what they believe will he the best possible schedule for the semester to follow. 
Each student is responsible for meeting with advisors, fulfilling the core 
curriculum requirements, enrolling in pre- and co-requisites; the process at 
times seems endless, especially for freshman who are entrusted with registering 
on their own for the first time for the spring semester, without the help of 
orientation leaders that were present their first time. For seniors, there is 
the joy of registering first, with the best classes open, the best times, the best 
professors, and a final semester with at least a three day weekend. This period 
each semester is where all students make choices that will create the foundation 
for the semester to come, at least until drop/add begins. Kathleen Aheam. 





Clovlk^vkA:, Ituiii iliL lup. Cuuioc t^Ldlu^ in Lyuiks, walking in ihc DuKlbuvvl, tjclliiig cuuim: inluriiuiliun, waicin^ in SluJcni Scrvico. liub KicUruth uiui AiiJku Lu^uii. 



'hen the student is ready, 
the teacher will appear. 
'Z^n Proverb 




ying new supplies at the college bookstore. Bn^i MrGroth 

BOSTON 
COLLEGE 



UView kiosks are scattered around campus. Andrew Logan. 



2004-2005 



® 




le 2004-2005 academic course catalog. Myra Chai 



Lyons Hall, the home of Student Services. Bob Mcijrath. 



AraHpTTiirs I 



nfo^ repeat what others have 

J, said recjutes education; 

to cliallenge It recjiites brains. 

'Mary Pettibone Poole 




RounJ cable Jiscui... 



1 Ir- iiilvrmr dI llic Junks 1 lojun.-. Iibj.iiy. Mvi j L.'/ui 



Honors Progra 



M 



HONORS is a four-year humanities curriculum as "stLidia liumanitatis" 
was originally understood in the Renaissance: a shared search for 
what is humane, first in our studies, and then in ourselves. While 
focusing closely on specialized subjects -- and while students also pursue the 
usual academic majors from across the arts and sciences -- we still follow an 
overarching logic. This is the necessary but often neglected task of integration 
at a time when increasing complexity of thought impels scholars to know 
more and more about less and less. Our seminar conversations respond to 
the challenge of this fragmentation by asking students the basic questions 
that put all specialization into a humane context: What is the good? 
What should we value? What is truth? Is there such a thing as truth at all? 




;Cloclcwise, from upper left; Fulton Hall houses the CSOM lihrary, inside Jenks library, students discuss Don Quixote, Prof. Mark O'Connor shares his ideas. Myra Chai 



Cornerstone 



The Cornerstone Program at Boston College consists of five 
different courses freshmen can elect to take once during their 
first year in school. These courses include The Courage to 
Know, Cornerstone Advisement Seminar, Perspectives, First-Year 
Writing Seminar, and Freshman Topic Seminar. What separates 
Cornerstone sections from regular courses is the fact that the students 
are led by a faculty member who both teaches the course and serves as 
their academic advisor. In The Courage to Know, teachers are joined 
by a senior mentor who helps students adjust to and understand life 
at college. These classes are limited to a small number of students to 
encourage active participation and the ability to get to know a core 
group of fellow freshmen. Carolyn Dorazio. 





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Clockwise, from the top: fmhman dorm room, freshmen show their BC pride, the route freshmen tuok in the first convocation, a BC map. /Jd/j McCjrut/i, Vv Vy \\ 



'ducadon is not the filling 
of a pail but the lighting of 

'William Butler Yeats 




Devlin Hall, location of the Admissions Office. Bob McGrath. Freshman Orientation group. Vy Vy Vo. 



Scholarship- 
Winners 



Father Pedro Arrupe, S.J. has always, as a General, endeavored to mobilize the former students of Jesuit schools, 
colleges and universities for the modern social apostolate in their own walks of life. In a letter he addressed to the 
alumni of Jesuit educational institutions in 1968, Father Arrupe stated: "No man is born for himself alone." The 
insistence on social change in his address to the 10th International Congress of Jesuit Alumni of Europe in Valencia, on 
July 31, 1973, caused more than a ripple in Jesuit circles and in the world press. Words like "radical" were widely used to 
qualify the address. The word was quite appropriate if it means going to the root of the matter. The challenge of Father 
Arrupe to students of Jesuit schools in Europe applies to all of us who need education or more likely re-education for social 
justice and social action today. The scholarship award winners featured here have taken the words of Father Arrupe and 
are embodiments of the notiori of "men and women for others." They have been recognized by various organizations and 
presented with scholarships for their senior years. Here, we recognize them for their outstanding achievements and hope 
that they may serve as role-models for the BC community. 



Asian American Scholarship 

Sarah Ha 



Since their first arrival in America in the early nine- 
teenth century, Asian Americans have made many 
significant contributions to the development of our 
nationhood and the expansion of democratic institutions. 
In recognition of these achievements and of the important 
and expanding role Asian Americans play in our society, 
Boston College has established an annual scholarship to 
honor an outstanding student of Asian descent who exem- 
plifies the highest Asian American ideals and aspirations. 
The Asian American Scholarship is presented annually to 
a junior who demonstrates academic excellence, is commit- 
ted to promoting Asian American awareness, and serves 
both the Asian American and the wider communities on 
and off campus. The selection committee is composed of 
faculty members, staff, and administrators and is awarded 
at Boston College's annual Asian Culture Night Celebra- 
tion. The 2004 recipient of the Asian American Scholar- 
ship is Sarah Ha. A senior, Ha is the president of the 
Korean Students' Association (KSA) and is also active in 
the Asian Pacific Heritage Month Committee, the Asian 
Caucus, the Asian Christian Fellowship (ACF), the Philip- 




pine Society of Boston College (PSBC), the Chi- 
nese Students Association (CSA), and the Boston 
Korean Intercollegiate College Society (BKICS). Ha 
said that she was first inspired to become involved 
in the Asian American commimir^- when a comfort 
woman came to speak to the KSA. "When you hear 
this, it makes you realize that you have to share your 
history and culture. It's an incentive to give back 
liuman (.liynity." 



Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Scholarship 

Helina Teklehaimanot 



The Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship is awarded 
to a junior who best represents the ideals of Dr. 
Martin Luther King, Jr., including leadership, 
service, and academic accomplishment. This presti- 
gious award, given in February of the recipient's jui\ior 
year, covers seventy-five percent of the recipient's senior 
year tuition. Founded in 1982 by a group of faculty and 
administrators, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship 
has become the model for other university scholarships. 
The goal of the scholarship is to enhance diversity, multi- 
cultural etiucation, intercultural communication and 
understanding, and social justice on the Boston College 
campus while continuing to realize Dr. King's dream of 
social justice and equality. Helina Teklehaimanot, A&S 
'05, received the 2004 Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial 
Scholarship. She is the director of the Black Student 
Forum's public relations committee and chairs its political 
and academic affairs committee. "Martin Luther King in 
himself was someone that truly believed in love as a way to 
fight against evil, and his whole idea of nonviolence was 
that," said Teklehaimanot. "It's to love someone instead 

Oscar Romero Scholarship 

Arivee\^rgas 



Oscar A. Romero is a prominent and positive 
figure in Christianity. As Archbishop of El Sal- 
vador, Father Romero took it upon himself to 
give strength and guidance to the poor and oppressed of 
his country, speaking out against the excesses of the Salva- 
dorian government. Although he frequently faced many 
obstacles ancJ dangers from those who opposed his beliefs, 
Father Romero contiiiued to write and speak about the 
importance of justice. On March 24, 1980, while cele- 
brating the Eucharist, Archbishop Romero was shot and 
killed at the altar by a death squad assassin. Because of his 
extreme commitment to justice, he became a martyr to all 
people in a struggle with oppression. Each year the Oscar 
A. Romero Scholarship is given to a junior who exempli- 
fies Romero's ideals in both academic and community life. 
The 2004 award went to Arivee Vargas, A&S '05. In her 
acceptance speech, Vargas discussed ending neocolonial- 
ism in Latin America, as well as persevering programs such 
as affirmative action in the United States. Vargas cited that 
Romero refused to be silent when faced with social inequi- 
ties and injustices and encouraged her fellow students to 



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of hating and perpetuating that hate, because that 
doesn't solve anything." Teklehaimanot attributed 
her success to the service-oriented environment 
that Boston College promotes. She said that BC 
has taught her to love and to trust and that envi- 
ronment is what is responsible for so many talented 
student leaders. 




live by Romero's example. "Now more than ever," 
says Vargas, "I feel a responsibility to advocate for 
the Latino community. It is difficult to articulate 
exactly how I feel, but I know I must continue to be 
pro-active in ending social injustice far beyond my 
college years." 



The Foundations of 

STUDY ABROAD 



Hovey House was huilt by a Boston 
physician and member of the 
Harvard medical faculty, Dr. Daniel 
Dennison Slade, in 1879. Slade, along with 
a group of prominent Bostonians, moved 
west of Boston with the expansion of the 
railroad. These founders of Chestnut Hill 
believed that a balance of urban progress 
and an artfully created natural escape would 
promote creative and moral health. Slade 
deliberately chose to build with Georgian 
brick, a very unusual style for that time, 
in order to recreate the atmosphere of 
the traditional English country estate. In 
that carefully planned setting of house and 
grounds he found the inspiration to write 
The Evolution of Horticulture in New 
England, where he set out his idealist views 
on landscape architecture. With his most 
famous neighbor, Frederick Law Olmsted, he 
furthered the cause of natural preservation 
by helping to develop the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society and the Arnold 
Arboretum. Until Slade's death in 1896, his 
home was host to those who helped shape 
the area's creative life, including fellow 
physician Oliver Wendell Holmes and such 
famous literary figures as James Russell Lowell 
and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 

Today, Hovey House is home to 
the Center for International Partnerships 
and Programs, the home base for students 
abroad and Boston College's various 
international programs. In 1976, the 
Foreign Study Office, under the direction 
of James Flagg (RLL), begarr its first year of 
sending students abroad. A few years later, 
in 1979, several international programs were 



established, including an Irish exchange, 
an education practicum program, English 
department exchange, Law school faculty 
exchange and social work field programs. 
Now, about 800 students every year seize the 
opportunity to study abroad for a semester, 
year, or summer term. The majority of these 
students are in their junior year in college, 
although some first-semester seniors choose 
to study abroad as well. Whatever location 
one may choose offers the opportunity of a 
lifetime. This experience allows students to 
immerse themselves in a world so different 
from their own, both here at Boston College 
and their hometowns. Placing oneself in a 
foreign land forces one to learn about new 
cultures and builds a solid foundation for 
cultural appreciation and knowledge. The 
ability to adapt to a new living environment 
and society is a quality that will benefit one 
in all of his or her future endeavors. Not 
only will students take with them memories 
of an amazing time spent away from home, 
but a new sense of discovery and self 
Academic skills are established and practiced 
as well, since students face the option of 
applying many of their current studies to 
a global setting. This is especially helpful 
to students who wish to pursue a future in 
any area of international relations, or for 
those who simply wish to develop a better 
understanding of the complex world we live in. 
First paragi'aph from the Boston College 
Center for International Partnerships and 
Programs Website. Carolyn Dorazio. 




Arademirsl 



Pre-Professional 



For students who decide they want to pursue professions in the 
medical or legal fields, Boston College has a pre-professional 
program where faculty members advise them during their 
college years. Students interested in graduate studies in health 
enroll in the Pre-Medical, Pre-Dentistry or Pre-Veterinary Program; 
courses required include Chemistry, Biology, and Physics labs, as well 
as a course in English and a recommended course in Mathematics. 
Students also find support with MCAT preparatory materials and 
in finding appropriate internships. The Pre-Legal Program consists 
of recommended courses for students interested in attending law 
school atter graduation, covering useful skills, substantive areas of law 
and legal reasoning, and courses about law and the legal system. In 
addition, BC provides services helping students through the LSATs 
as well as each step in the application process. Carolyn Dorazio. 





Clockwise, from the top: Studcnu in chc quad, Uasson Hall trom U'Ncill Libraiy, School of Nursing's Cushing Hall, students walking in between class times, bob MciJrath. 




' I ii e indispensable first 
J. step to getting what 

you want out of life is this: 

Decide what you want. 

'Ben Stein 




A studenr cart-lnllv cilibnitL-s his sample. Heather Page. 




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Two students discuss their results. Heather Page. 



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Laboratory supplements are required of Pre-med students. 
Heather Page. 



Fulton Hall houses many CSOM related classes. P>ob McGrat/i. 



The Foundations of 

CAPSTONE 



This highest stone in an arch imparts a 
visible completion, a final stroke and 
culmination. Though this statement 
implies a sense of conclusion, it also brings 
forward the idea of creating a solid foundation 
from which to build on. Boston College's 
Capstone Program for seniors and some 
second-semester juniors is one that involves 
both looking to the past and looking into the 
future. In order to move steadily ahead in life 
one must acknowledge and appreciate where 
he or she has already been. The Capstone 
Program offers a variety of classes focused 
on the program's central theme of personal 
development and living a "good" life. The 
courses are taken during one semester in the 
last year of students' undergraduate careers, 
or in a few exceptions, the second semester of 
their junior year. Each student becomes an 
integral member of a small discussion-based 
class composed of around fifteen students, 
and is only allowed to take one Capstone 
course before graduation. Core questions 
include, "What have you made of your Boston 
College education?" "What has it made of 
you?" and "How will you carry out the lifelong 
commitments you have begun to envision?" 
The Capstone course is a culmination of 
students' personal and academic lives at 
Boston College, and helps build a platform 
for taking everything they have leariied 
and applying it to future endeavors. 
Capstone programs and variations 
of it are widespread throughout many other 
colleges and universities in the United 
States. Some involve writing a senior thesis, 
developing leadership skills, and supporting 
seniors in their job searches. Here at Boston 
College, the courses focus on unifying "the 



undergraduate experience, both personal and 
academic, by areview of the moral, intellectual 
and spiritual ideals at the heart of the Jesuit 
tradition." In 1990, Boston College's former 
Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, 
J. Robert Barth, S.J., along with several 
theology professors decided to implement 
the Capstone program of study here. In 
doing so. Dean Barth gathered senior faculty 
members and senior staff members together 
to create it. In 1991, ten faculty members 
led the first Capstone courses at Boston 
College; every year since then three new 
faculty members have developed and taught 
new courses for the program. Originally, 
the courses were closely interwoven with 
one another, but now that the program has 
become extremely popular and continues to 
expand, the subjects have diversified as new 
expertise has been introduced by new faculty 
members. Capstone seminars fill up quickly, 
and students ofteri contact professors before 
registration to ensure their spot in the class. 
They are 500-level University courses, but 
some are cross-listed with several departments 
in the College of Arts & Sciences, allowing 
the seminars to count as an elective towards 
the major. These departments include 
Philosophy, Communication, English, 
Theology, Economics, and Sociology. All 
the while, though, the core themes of 
personal reflection and development have 
remained constant within the framework 
of each unique course, new and old. 
Carolyn Dorazio. 



Faculty Perspectives 



The following faculty members have been selected by members of the Class of 2005. Students nominated pro- 
fessors because of the positive impact they have had on their four years at Boston College. These teachers 
embody the spirit of education at a liberal arts college, and are what students hope to encounter at some point 
in their college careers. By going above and beyond what is expected of a college professor, each of these individuals has 
touched students on a new level. They have taken the spirit of Boston College well beyond the walls of the classroom. 




Seth Jacobs 

History 

I had Professor Jacobs from the history department last 
semester for American Foreign Policy II and this semes- 
ter for America's War in Vietnam. He is without question 
the best lecturer I have had in my years at Boston Col- 
lege. He makes students actually look forward to going 
to class (the fact that 100 plus students attend on a fairly 
regular basis is quite a feat.) He is easily accessible, hold- 
ing informal office hours at Starbucks in McElroy for sev- 
eral hours on Thursdays. He also has two books coming 
out within the next six months. I believe that he should be 
recognized as one of the outstanding professors here at BC. 

Rory McGovem 

College of Arts & Sciences '05 




David A, Krauss 

Biology 

I would like to recognize Professor David A. Krauss of the 
Biology and Geology Dept., who has had a profound 
effect on me and who I think has gone above and beyond 
his teaching role in helping his students. Unlike many other 
professors he always makes time, even outside office hours to 
help a student in his class. But beyond this he encourages 
students to be active in biological research outside of class. 
He encouraged me to start a project that I probably would 
not have had a chance to do otherwise. And he gives his time 
and expertise freely to whoever needs it. He is always happy 
to nominate students for awards and write letters of recom- 
mendation, sometimes without them even having to ask. 
His classes are also the best I have taken at BC. He truly is 
an exceptional professor and deserves to Ix- honored as one. 



Benjamin Janse 

College of Arts & Sciences '05 




Dr. Richard Rowland 

Social Work 

I took a two-semester social policy course with Dr. Rowland 
through the 3/2 program in the Graduate School of Social 
Work. Dr. Rowland is an innovative professor whose goals 
and objectives for his classes are not only to build a founda- 
tion of knowledge about social policy issues, but to inspire in 
each of his students an ability to internalize the needs of the 
marginalized and disenfranchised and be moved to action. 
He himself was a lobbyist for geriatric care and rights, and 
he brings his experience in the field with him into the class- 
room, allowing his students to observe practical application 
of an otherwise theoretical field. Because of Dr. Rowland, 
after 1 complete my MSW program next year 1 will be apply- 
ing to Harvard to pursue a doctorate in social policy. Dr. 
Rowland's classes were well-structured and informative, and 
he was the most considerate of any professor 1 have encoun- 
tered to students' needs, concerns, and learning styles. Dr. 
Rowland is an asset to the Boston College community and 
to the greater community as well. 1, for one, appreciate 
all that he has taught me both in the classroom and out. 

Lauren L. Gilfeather 

Lynch School of Education '05 

Graduate School of Social Work '06 




Maria Kakavas 

Classics 

I wanted to take the opportunity to recognize Maria 
Kakavas from the Classics Dept. She is possibly one of 
the most amazing people 1 have ever met as well as the 
most caring. She will do anything for her students so that 
they can achieve their goals and dreams. She puts everyone 
before any of her own needs. Prof. Kakavas is also incredibly 
intelligent. She has total knowledge of what seems to be 
everything and anything. On a more personal level, she has 
been helping me make crucial contacts for post-graduate life 
and helping me achieve my dreams of living and working in 
Europe. She has made many calls and gone way out of her 
way to simply make what 1 thought were impossible dreams 
into a feasible reality. If anyone deserves an award on this 
campus, it is Maria Kakavas of the Classics department. 

Christopher Chavaje 

College of Arts & Sciences '05 





Aradpmirs 





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STUDENT LITE 

EdltedBy: 

EIizabethEthun 

KhuHuynh 





utside the classroom, Boston College students 
lead extremely active lives. In addition to the 
hours of class time and their intimate relation- 
ships with O'Neill and Bapst, students also develop strong friend- 
ships that will be with them for many years to come. From the 
first terrifying day of college when these students throw themselves 
into a community as of yet unknown to them, to the last tearful 
day when they must say goodbye to the comfort ot undergraduate 
life, the old cliche is certainly true for these great groups of friends: 
at Boston College, there is never a dull moment! Whether it is 
attending a thought-provoking lecture, relaxing at a tailgate or 
cheering with hundreds of other students in the Superfan section, 
BC students always manage to have a great time. They build 
upon their academic careers they are commended for and to it 
add their own sense of fun that is so reflective of the student body. 
Student life is as diverse as the students who are living it. The 
foundations of the general student life are captured in the pages 
that follow but the true stories are found in the hearts and memo- 
ries of all those who have spent four years of their lives on the 
Heights. Marisa Fusco and Myra Chai 



The Foundations of 

CONVOCATION 



The idea of First Flight sprung 
from the passion of two senior 
students, Patrick Downes and 
Michael Hundgen in 2003. The idea was 
introduced to President Leahy and Father 
Joe Marchese from the Office of First Year 
Experience, who had the idea to begin 
the 2004 academic year with a formal 
Convocation. The ideas were interwined 
and put into action in the Spring of 2003. 
Patrick Downes and MichaelHundgenboth 
"love Boston College and wanted to leave 
some kind of mark on [their] time here at 
this University." Michael Hundgen states. 
"We wanted the freshmen of BC to begin 
their time at our school with a memory 
and tradition that will last well beyond 
their four years. Boston College is a special 
place filled with a deep sense of community 
and compassion for the mission." 
During the seven orientation 
sessions held throughout the summer, 
students were given a grandeur novel. 
Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy 
Kidder to read. The novel highlights Dr. 
Paul Farmer, a man reknowned for his 
kindness arid who displays foundations of 
the Jesuit Community of which Boston 
College is built upon. The novel focuses on 
volunteerism in the largest scope possible, 
the scope of an international epidemic. 
Following the first several days of 
school, freshmen dressed up and gathered 
to begin Convocation. The evening 
began with a barheque in the Dust 
Bowl and a procession to Conte Forum. 
Megan Greene, A&S 2008, states, "The 
procession took a long time and the 
weather was cold but overall, I had fun." 
The students were grouped by dorms and 
everyone watched as one student would 



light a torch symbolizing the light of the 
beginning of their college experience. 
"It felt good to have people cheer for 
you," said Aaron Lally, A&S 2008. 

The procession continued as stu- 
dents were seated and were greeted by 
words of contributing men and women 
of Boston College. Speaker Tracy Kidder 
gave a brief summary of his novel and 
introduced Paul Farmer who joked with 
the audience but remained consistent 
about his topic ot each student making 
the best of Boston College, because edu- 
cation is a gift not granted to everyone 
everywhere. Paul Farmer concluded 
with the message in the words of St. 
Ignatius to "Go set the world aflame." 

Convocation in 2004 restarts 
a tradition in which foundations of 
unity, education, and volunteerism are 
embraced. Moreover, two seniors exem- 
plifying the spirit of Boston College 
made an intiative to set a new tradition. 
Boston College is a changing establish- 
ment built on fundamental values and 
adhering to Jesuit beliefs. Convocation is 
a perfect example of binding the old with 
the new, where old traditions are made 
into new models. Each year's convoca- 
tion will include a barbeque, a procession, 
and guest speakers who have themselves 
changed the world in some way. Jun 
Hong, A&S 2008, notes "I thought it 
was a great way to begin the year and I 
enjoyed being part of the first group to 
do so." Convocation will be held annu- 
ally to send forth the freshmen of Boston 
College as they are introduced to the 
established foundations and changing 
traditions of this University. 
-Nhu Huynh 



Far Right: Boston College Superfans 
always have a large turnout during 
games. There is an immense pride in 
BC sports. Photo fc^ Heather Page 

Right: On game days, students put 
on theit Superfan t-shirts along with 
friends and usually tailgate or hang 
out before the games begin. Photo 
submitted 

Bottom: Students can show their BC 
pride by painting their faces or wear- 
ing maroon ribbons or pom poms in 
their hair. Photo by Melissa Koski 




Above: Going to games is a great 
way to hang out with close friends at 
football, hockey games, or any other 
sporting event. Photo submitted by 
Myra Choi. 

Right: Generally before games, poms 
poms are given out and are waved 
when the Eagles score a touchdown 
or score. Photo submitted. 



being a 

SUPERFAN?? 








It's game day at BC. Outside, swarms of yellow tee 
shirts are heading toward Alumni Stadium. They are 
coming from all directions, bearing logos such as "Fly 
Like an Eagle," and "Always Believe in BC". They carry 
with them a wave of enthusiasm, sweeping the campus like 
nothing before. Some of them are painted in maroon and 
gold from head to toe. All of them are cheering with all 
their might. Who are these people, chanting things like 
"Let's go Eagles," and singing "Build Me up Buttercup" 
at the top of their lungs/ They are the one and only BC 
Superfans - the backbone of Boston College school spirit. 
BC Superfans have been devoted to Boston College 
since the first day they set their eyes on their bright yellow 
shirts at freshman orientation. These shirts have an 
incredible significance at BC, both unifying the students 
and creating distinct identities for the university's four 
classes. Different logos distinguish freshmen, sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors from each other, separating the years, 
but also uniting each class under its own unique insignia. 
Although seperate, when seen together, united Superfans 
create a sea of yellow that is easily distinguishable at 
any sporting event. The energy of the crowd shows the 
devotion and loyalty Superfans have to BC. "They are 
willing to show equal enthusiasm to both the least and 
most popular games without fail," as senior Jen Foley 
noted. If there's one thing Superfans want to make 
clear, it's that they love their school! WE ARE BC! 
'Lara Philips 



"Superfans support their 
team even if BC is losing 
by 14 in the 4th quarter 



the 3rcl." 

—Prince Kyereme '07 



"Beir>g in the BC Band, I 
jj,,^j^J feel a lot of support from 
^^' ^^E: Superfans. It's encouraging 
/i^>''' when they know the words 

to the songs." -James Laad 

'06 



"It's not easy to be a 
Superfan. It takes a lot of 
dedication and endurance 
to stand through a four 
hour game!" 
-Peter Moore '07 



.Vfi?-^'\! 




"Superfans are the spirit 
that embodies the history 
of BC and the connection 
that transcends the classes 
and brings BC students 
together." -David Li '05 




.SriirJenr Life 



Shea Field becomes a parking lot 
filled with alumni, patents, families 
and of course BC students who a 
come for good food, dtink, fun, and 
football! 

Much of the cailgating was done 
outside the 'Plex near the sta- 
dium. Food was provided during 
the Maroon and Gold Tail- 
sate during Parents' Weekend. 




Tailgating is a tradition in some families where 
children arc brought along to join in the fes- 
tivities, watch the game and cheer on the Eagles. 



Boston College students get to eat, drink, and hang 
out for several hours before games, all while display- 
ing their school spirit. Is that a Super Fan shirt I see.' 




There are few things more perfect on a crisp, fall 
Saturday in New England than going to a foothall 
game and cheering the home team to victory. Tail- 
gating is arguably the best part of the football season and 
BC students certainly know how to do it in style. During 
home games for two hours before and two hours after the 
game, cars are allowed to fill up what limited parking is 
available on campus including the Mod parking lot, Shea 
Field, and the parking garages, and the party gets started. 
Aroma of food and beer spreads throughout the campus 
from the stadium to the entrance gate and students know 
the game is soon to begin. 

Some students have compared it to a picnic; you 
can roam from one group to another, taking advantage of 
the generosity of your friends and their families without 
having to cook your own meal. Others have been quick to 
affirm that it is their favorite part of a football weekend. 
Tailgating is also about post game activities where the fes- 
tivities continue and the real partying begins. The Mods 
are the best places to find that kind of action, but BCPD 
keeps close tabs on them during and after the games. How- 
ever, tailgating at Boston College is not only about current 
students; plenty of alumni and parents are quick to join in 
the festivities. And who can blame them? It's a terrific 
way to spend a Saturday afternoon. 
-Kerri Clark 



Tailgating this year was...? 




Its great to see parents 
setting up tables to feed 
starving students. Some of 
them don't even seem to 
have tickets. They just feed 
their kids and go home." 
-Jake Hallman '07 




"Tailgating is fun - too bad 
we need a football game to 
do it." - Kevin Sawyer '06 




"I didn't know what tail- 
gating really was until I 
had friends living in the 
Mods." 
- M. Amaris Kinne '05 




"My parents come to almost 
every game. We're out there 
with barbeque and beer and 
so many people stop by cause 
we're the best." 
-Peter Brogowski, '06 



4': 



Friday: 

Welcome and Information 

The Classroom Experience 

Pops On The Heights Scholar- 
ship Gala 

Saturday: 

Boston College Fan Fest 

Maroon and Gold Tailgate 

BC vs. UMass Football Game 

Sunday: 

Parents' Weekend Family 
Liturgy 

Brunch with President Leahy 



Right: Parents Weekend ended with a Sunday 
mass in O' Neil Plaza. Father Leahy joined the 
parents at hriinch prior to the event. 

First Bottom: The Pops On The Heights Gala 
entertained parents and students with singing and 
dancing which was held at Conte Forum. 

Second Bottom: On the Saturday of Parents' 
Weekend, students and parents enjoyed tailgating 
before the game against UMass which ended in a 
landslide victory. 








Parents' 



Weekend? 




"1 took my parents to Lucia's 
in the North End. They 
ended up giving us a lot of 
free food because we were 
from BC!" 
-Karen Marciolik '06 




"The football game was my 
favorite part of the weekend. 
Tailgating, cheering, and 
u :irching BC win with my 
p:ircnts was fun!" -Karla 
l.oyia '07 





Top: The Heightsmen entertained a group of 
thousands which contributed to a fundraising of 
over a miUion dollars. 

Left: Parents got to know the Boston College staft 
and Jesuit Priest during Parents' Weekend gaining 
insight about the opportunities an dideals of the 
university. 



Weekend 



As the first weekend of October rolled around this 
year, students at Boston College knew what to do. 
They cleaned their rooms, polished themselves up, 
and got ready to receive their parents for the annual Parents' 
Weekend. On this weekend, parents traveled from near and 
far bringing with them groceries, winter clothes, and special 
requests for their sons and daughters. Although students had 
only been away from home for one month, they were en- 
thusiastic about the weekend, which usually includes meals 
in Boston, sightseeing, shopping, football, and quality time 
with the family. For freshmen that are away from home for 
the first time, it is the perfect remedy for homesickness and 
a great opportunity to show off their new school to their par- 
ents. For seniors who are enjoying their last year in college, 
it is a great weekend to show their parents a place that has 
meant so much to them over the years for one last time. For 
everyone, parents' weekend makes for an enjoyable couple of 
days to share with proud parents. 

This year, parents' weekend kicked off with an oppor- 
tunity for parents to follow students to class, allowing them 
to experience the classroom as their son or daughter does on 
any normal Friday. The twelfth annual Pops On The Heights 
Scholarship Gala followed later that evening. The Boston 
Pops Orchestra and Boston College Chorale gave an amaz- 
ing performance, providing both parents and students with a 
taste of the cultural environment that is a big part of campus 
life. On Saturday, parents were able to socialize with other 
BC parents and students at the Maroon and Gold Tailgate 
before watching the BC Eagles play the University of Mas- 
sachusetts. The game ended with an impressive win, enhanc- 
ing the spirit of BC Superfans. The weekend concluded that 
Sunday after a Family Liturgy on O'Neill Plaza and Brunch 
with Father Leahy. Overall, parents' weekend was a success 
and was time well spent tor both parents and students alike. 
-Lara Philips 




"Parents Weekend is great 
because you get to see your 
parents and eat good food in 
a restaurant for the first time 
in a while." - Margaret Chow, 
CSOM '06 




"I felt so proud watching BC 
slaughter UMass on Parents' 
weekend. Winning added to 
the school's energy as a whole 
while our parents were here." 
-Richard Fleischer '08 



Snidenr T.ifp 



AHANA Leadership 
Council Boat Cruise 



The ALC Boat Cruise set sail on Friday, Sep- 
tember 24, 2004 out of Rowe's Wharf in Bos- 
ton Harbor. A sold-out crowd of 600 boarded 
the Spirit of Boston to spend a night of dancing, 
mingling, and socializing amidst the cool waters and 
bright lights of downtown Boston. 

ALC, or the AHANA Leadership Council, 
holds the event annually to give students of all dif- 
ferent cultures a chance to dress to the nines and cel- 
ebrate diversity at Boston College. The event is one 
of the largest events given by the ALC and also one 
of the most anticipated. The organization reflects the 
value of multiculturalism at BC and the foundation 
of equality amongst all of us at this fine Jesuit institu- 
tion. The foundation of diversity at Boston College 
reflects the Jesuit ideal of acceptance of all races and 
cultures. Students got a chance to celebrate the racial 
unity and the increasing diversity of the campus. 

As always, the night was sensational with ter- 
rific music, delicious food, and good company. Stu- 
dents enjoyed a wonderful night and the AHANA 
Leadership Council was very pleased with the event 
and looks forward to even bigger successes in the years 
to come. 
■Alicia True 




What do 

YOU think 



? 



Students gathered in front of Conte Forum prior to 
departing from Boston College to go to the harhor to 
attend the ALC Boat Cruise. Traditionally, the cruise 
marks off a new beginning for the school year as well 
another celebration of the diversity of BC. Photo 
submitted. 




The ALC" Boat Cruise provided food and beverages for 
attending students. This year's boat cruise was another 
success according to many Boston College students who 
found the event to be fun and enjoyable. Photo 
Med. 



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Top: The Ahana Leadership Council Boat Cruise 
was also a time to meet new people and hang out 
with friends. The event gives students a chance 
to dress up and visit the Boston Harbor. Photo 
submitted. 

Far Left: Students gathered together to enjoy the 
food provided on the boat cruise. Most students 
had stated that the cruise gets better each year as 
the event receives more publicity annually. Photo 
submitted. 

Left: Most of all, the ALC Boat Cruise is a time 
to dance! Music is played by a D] and the event is 
filled with energy and fun. Photo submitted. 




"BC students look forward 
to the annual ALC Boat 
Cruise because they know 
that they will find a won- 
derful celebration, in a 
very classy environment, 
with great music, good 
food, and a diverse group 
of people. " - Charles A. 
Grandson IV, President of 
the ALC 




"It was my first time going 
to the ALC Boat Cruise 
and I had a wonderful time. 
I got a chance to meet a lot 
of wonderful people." 
-Rebecca Choi '08 




"This year 1 thought the 
Boat Cruise was, again, a 
great success. It's a great 
time to get out and see 
everyone having fun. The 
whole night is about let- 
ting loose and enjoying 
yourself." - Jessica Appel- 
man, the Chief Editor of 
the ALC Newsletter 




"The Boat Cruise was a 
success this year. It was a 
planned well-planned event 
and was on a wonderful 
night with great weather." 
-Jeremiah Ketum '07 



Snidenr T.ifp 



HOME 

COMING 



Homecoming at Boston College took place this year 
over a beautiful fall weekend in early November. On 
Friday evening, students had the chance to attend the 
Homecoming Dance downtown at the Boston Sheraton Hotel. A 
sold-out crowd of about 2,000 students met outside of Conte Forum 
to load up in school buses and caravan over to the hotel where the 
event would take place. The dance lasted from eight o'clock in the 
evening until one o'clock in the morning, when students reloaded 
the buses and headed back to campus. A DJ played both the latest 
pop songs and old-time favorites as BC'ers crowded the dance floor. 
Hors d'oeuvres were served buffet-style for the students, and tickets 
could be purchased for beer and wine from the 'bar. The night was 
a success, and students enjoyed an evening of dressing up, dancing, 
and enjoying the good company of friends and classmates. Saturday 
afternoon, Boston College played Rutgers for the Homecoming 
football game. Typical for a football Saturday, students were up early 
and tailgating outside like good Superfans should! Kick-off was at 
3:30, and the stands were filled with current students, alumni who 
returned to their alma mater for the event, and BC fans. Halftime 
featured the welcoming back and honoring of the 1 984 Boston College 
Eagles to Alumni Stadium. The 2004 Eagles went on to beat the 
Scarlet Knights of Rutgers with a score of 21 to 10 in front of 41,126 
fans. All in all, the weekend was an exciting celebration for Boston 
College students and will bring great memories in the years to come. 
'Alicia True 




Above: The homecoming dance ended up being 
sold out and rarher crowded according to some 
students. However the night was still fun and 
full of memories. Photo fn' Myra Chai 




Above: Homccominji; was a wonderful chance 
to dress up and dance with friends. The event 
followed a great win over Rutgers in football. 
Photo by Myra Chai 




Above: Homecoming is a time to get 
decked out in your finest dress or 
gear and dance the night away. Photo 
by Melissa Koski 



Above: Homecoming included dancing to great music with 
friends. Rarely do college kids get the opportunity to go to a 
formal and get dressed up. Photo by Myra Chai. 



"I had a lot of fun at home- 
coming. I enjoyed dinner 
and the dance." 
-Francesca Erts, '08 



"1 thought homecoming 

was okay until people 

started to get violent and 

rowdy." 

-David Nguyen, '06 



!".>■ 



"Good tiines. Great times. 
It was a beautiful day and I 
had an overall good time." 
-Prasad Krasd, '05 



"I loved the homecoming 
dance. It was the perfect 
opportunity to have an 
enormous dance parry 
with everyone you knou: 

- without being crammeJ 
between a mod srairc;i.sti 
and a dirty futon." 

- Katherine Patten, 05 



.Sriifjpnr I.ifp 



Far Right: Upper Campus is where the 
majority of freshmen Uve. O'Connell 
House, laundr>', a weight room, and a 
basketball court are also there for all 
to enjoy. 

Right: Movers help freshmen and 
sophomores move into dorms. Each 
year, students volunteer to arrive on 
campus early in order to assist other 
students. 

Below: Moving in day can be one 
hectic day! Elevators in most of the 
dorms on campus make it easier, and 
meeting new friends is always worth it! 




Above: It can definitely be cramped 
in the dorms, especially freshmen year 
with those imfamous forced triples. 
But somehow, ever\'thing seems to fit. 

Right: Senior year we finally get more 
space to relax, watch tv, or eat. Most 
seniors have their own common rooms 
as well as kitchen and dining areas. 



like best about 



living the 

itfHorm life? 



v 



DORM 








"I loved living on Newton. 
It was nice to have a 
home to come back to 
at the end of the day." 
-Maura Donnantuono '07 




Oh, the joys of dorm life! Communal showers, 
interesting roommates, noisy hallways, crowd- 
ed laundry rooms, and endless beeping alarm 
clocks. Sound familiar? We've all been through it. Mov- 
ing into the dorms freshman year, most of us had no 
idea what to expect. Little did we know that living in 
the dorms meant sleep deprivation due to noisy hallways 
and thin walls, waiting in line to take a shower, and ten- 
sion with roommates living with you in a tiny cubicle. 
Sound like fun? Actually, it is! Despite these drawbacks, 
there is nothing like living in the dorms and taking part 
in late night adventures, watching movies, going to Su- 
perbowl and other theme parties, and making life-long 
friends. 

Living in the dorms, whether it is on Newton, 
Upper, College Road, or Lower, makes for a unique ex- 
perience. Juniors that decide to live off campus often 
miss the convenience of living in the dorms. It's a won- 
derful thing to be able to roll out of bed five minutes 
before class and still make it on time - that is, if you 
don't live on Newton. But it only gets better from there. 
Whether you live in a double, a quad, or an eight-man, 
or the anything but luxurious Walsh Hall versus the new 
hotel-like 110 St. Thomas Moore, living in the dorms is 
bound to be a positive experience: bringing you closer 
to your friends and causing you to have some of the best 
times of your four years at Boston College. 
-Lara Philips 




"Living off campus is fun, 
but I miss having a meal 
plan and the convenience 
of living on campus." - 
James Ahn '06 



"Living in the dorms 
makes it easy to make 
friends because of the 
small community feel. 
You get to see the same 
people every day." -Julian 
Kiani '08 




"Superbowl parties in. 
the dorms are always fun. 
There's nothing like free 
pizza, soda, and watching a 
good game with your best 
friends and neighbors." -TJ 
Stancil '05 



The Foundations of 

SENIORS 



So we're here. We're seniors. It's hard to 
say where the time went these past four 
years. We went from the beginning of 
college to the beginning of the rest of our lives, 
and what was it that happened in between? 
September of 2001. There we were 
-starting a new chapter, standing at the 
threshold ot our first college dorm room, 
meeting our first college roommate, go- 
ing to our first college class. Setting up the 
foundations of our Boston College careers 
with barely a clue as to what lay ahead and 
a whole lot of things left behind. And so we 
began. A dorm, a campus, and a city were 
about to become home to us. We learned the 
ropes. We learned our way around campus. 
We ventured down Comm. Ave. We found 
Who's On First, apartment parties, late night 
at McElroy. We thoroughly celebrated foot- 
ball season with Saturday morning tailgates, 
painted faces, and yellow tee shirts. We got 
to be around for four years of victories against 
Notre Dame! We found out what it meant 
to be a Superfan. Christine Boccieri, LSOE 
2005, remembers, "Every game we were out 
there, in our Superfan shirts tailgating until 
the game started. And of course we would 
stand through the whole thing." We always 
believe in BC. We learned what it meant to 
be a part of a Jesuit institution. We met great 
professors, we took challenging classes, we 
camped out in O'Neil Library trying to get it 
all done. We went on spring breaks to Aca- 
pulco or with the Appalachia volunteers. We 
studied outside in the Dustbowl. We found 
true friends. As Nicole Trincellito, A&S 
2005 states, "When we were first freshmen 
we'd hop on the Comm. Ave bus, try to find 
a non-existent party, and then just ride the 



bus back. And while that made for some 
crazy bus rides, it also makes being a senior 
great, because over three years you've fi- 
nally figured out who your friends are, and 
more importantly, where the party's at." 
We made memories. Each one of us found 
our niche. And the years started passing by. 
Somewhere throughout all of it we grew up. 
May of 2005. Here we are. We've 
spent our last year ot college tying up the 
loose ends. We spent our last year of college 
celebrating. We found a second home at 
Mary Ann's. We discovered dollar draughts 
at happy hour. We continued to build 
friendships as we built up our resumes. We 
finished up graduation requirements as we 
filled out job applications. We each did it 
a little differently, hut we all finished with 
the same ending to a great story. We are 
now looking back at what people will say 
were the best four years of our lives and 
looking forward to all the mystery of what 
life will be like in the "real world." "For 
me, being a senior is like being in the wait- 
ing room of a doctor's office, except that 
I'm waiting for rest of my life to begin. I'm 
desperately trying to be brave, but I know 
I'll be ok because I've been well-prepared, 
as long as there are no needles." said Joseph 
Mendes, A&S 2005. As we close out our 
time at Boston College, we raise our glass- 
es to a home that has given us so much and 
become such a part ot who we are. For Bos- 
ton, for Boston, till the echoes ring again. . . 
'Alicia True 




SriiHpnr life 



Right: The trip to watch the Notre 
Dame game was filled with countless 
memories, topped off by the Eagles 
thrilling win over the Irish. Photo 
submitted (ry Mcirisa Fusco 

Below: There was certainly cause to 
celebrate after BC beat Notre Dame. 
Celebrating admist the insanity fol- 
lowing the game. Photo submitted 




Above: Sometimes it's too hard to put down that 
cell phone, even to take a picture with a friend. 
Photo submitted 



Right: Sometimes it's nice to get away from the ci>lJ 
winters of Boston, even if it means creating your 
own Hawaii. Photu by Mania Fiisco 




We are almost there. We've come so far and yet have so 
far to go. As juniors, we are finally upperclassmen, and 
have two years under our belts. New friends, new classes, 
new parties, we have a whole lot to look forward to. Most of us live 
off campus, along Comm. Ave., Sutherland, and Foster Street, which 
allows us to really get to know the neighborhood at the wee hours of 
the morn. The bus is a welcomed sight on those cold afternoons, but 
it's nice to know that we don't have as far to go to get into the city or 
home from a restaurant or movie. We have become pros at dealing 
with crappy houses, mean landlords, and unpredictable amenities. 
Many of us are abroad, having gone through the friendly people at 
the Hovey House, and the stressful and exhausting process of apply- 
ing to foreign schools, making sure we will be able to graduate, and 
getting approval from our majors to leave, and are now representing 
BC in major universities all over the world. For those of us gone 
for the year, we salute you, we miss you, and we send some BC love. 
Supposedly at this point we have a plan for the last couple of years 
at BC and are beginning to plan for the future, but for some of us, 
that means deciding whether or not to head to campus for the eve- 
ning. Becoming familiar with professors, getting better registration 
times, and generally being regarded by more than half the student 
body as older and wiser, we, as juniors have a good thing going. But 
we begin to look forward to what is coming up. We anticipate our 
own mod, and are getting excited about writing our thesis. OK, 
maybe not the latter, but senior year is so close we can taste it, and 
seeing as we've come so far, we might as well set our eyes on the prize! 



What did YOU think? 




"I think the best thing 
about being a junior is 
not having to worry about 
my life after college yet." 
- Brady Smith, A&S 




"Juniors have the chance to 

study abroad in places like 

Denmark!" 

' Shen Chen, A&S 




"It's about the satisfac- 
tion in having declared 
your major and being 
able to actually be certain 
when you announce it." 
'Stephanie Johnson, CSOM 




"I think juniors have had 
the experience that makes 
them more mature, more 
learned, and more focused." 
-Peter Cowgill, A&S 



Far right: Here sophomores hang 
out in a dorm room. Being a sopho- 




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more includes new responsibilities 
and opportunities. Photo submitted 

Right; Friends get ready to go out tor 
a night on the town. Photo submitted 


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Below: Friendships that were built 
during (reshmen year continue onto 
sophomore year. Friends here are 
seen dressing up. Photo submitted. 





^ 




Above: Sophomore Superfans 
seen here hanging out during a game 
wearing Boston College gear to sup- 
port the Eagles. Photo submitted 



What is 



it like to be a 



Sophomore^ 




r^Lripmn 



SOPHOMORES 



They're the "wise fools" of the school, spread out 
through college road and lower campus. With 
freshman year behind them, BC sophomores are 
eager to return to another year of college life. This year, 
they know what to expect from living away from home, and 
they feel more comfortable around BC. They no longer 
have to worry about confusing the names of buildings or 
not recognizing any faces on campus. As sophomore Elaina 
Matoolc commented, "It's nice to be established with friends 
and know how things at school work." After a year of living 
on their own, they have formed friends and learned their way 
around both BC and Boston. With their past experience, they 
now know how to balance school work and partying to get 
the best of both worlds. For the most part, BC sophomores 
find themselves in a comfortable "niche" at school. 
Along with the comfort of being a sophomore comes 
the pressure of preparing for the future. As early as September 
BC sophomores begin searching for off campus apartments to 
live in junior year. Those who wish to study abroad must go 
through the process of researching the program they want to 
attend and applying for it in the spring. In addition, at this point 
in their college career, undecided sophomores are pressured to 
choose a major to concentrate on for the rest of their years at 
BC. Despite the major responsibilities that come with their 
second year at BC, sophomores have a lot to look forward to. 
With only one year behind them, sophomores still have over 
half of their time left at BC to experience and enjoy. This gives 
them ample time to make the best of their college experience. 
As sophomore Dan Li pointed out, "Being adjusted to college 
life allows sophomores to have a better idea of what they want 
out of their college experience and to explore those options." 
'Lara Philips 



"Being able to live with my 
friends and not having to 
live off campus." 
-Kate Ceredona '07 




"I couldn't wait for the 
football games to begin 
and to be with my family of 
Eagles here at BC." 
-Anne Woodbury '07 



"1 love living with seven of 
my best friends in Walsh. 
It's the best place to be!" 
-Ashley Mattys '07 



ii» 





p 



"1 looked forward to 
reinforcing connections 1 
made last year and forming 



the most out of my college 

experience." 

-Tristan Smith '07 



Shidenf T.ifp 



FRESHMEN 



The first year is highly remembered not onLy as a difficult 
transitional period but for most students, the first step 
towards pre-adulthood and independence. So, the 
relief began in May from verification via one letter stating, 
"Congratulations. You've been accepted to Boston College." The 
anxiety and excitement built up again prior to the week of move- 
in mostly expressing an overwhelming apprehension of being on 
one's own, "Crap. I'm going to be in college on my own and I don't 
know how to do laundry." Over 2,000 freshmen stepped foot on 
campus attending their first college classes on September 7, 2004. 
While some got lost, most went to class, found a seat, sat down and 
were a bit satisfied with themselves as individuals who had made 
it so far. For a week or longer, freshmen went around saluting their 
name, and their home state along with hand shakes and smiles. 
As the year progressed, freshmen settled into college life 
rather easily. The readings, the papers, and the work piled up from 
perhaps days of procrastination as the statement rolling off many 
freshmen lips was, "I'm so tired!" Lasting friendships were built 
that would endure the test of time, for these students will look 
back and say, "Hey, remember when we first met at late night?" 
The year went by rather quickly, and in a flash it was Thanksgiving 
break. Following several midterms, freshmen were delighted to 
rest for the four weeks of winter break. They conversed with 
fellow freshmen attending other universities bearing a Boston 
College pride. They were now officially eagles soaring to glory. 
Coming back from winter break, the idea of actually 
being college students had been imprinted. Accordingly, being 
a freshman also connotes inexperience, new beginnings, and 
three more years to go. Many will look back with regret of their 
first year wishing they had done something different. Most 
will be satisfied with the social and academic achievements 
they have made. All will have embarked on a journey of 
autonomy in a great institution we call Boston College. 
' Nhu Hianh 




What do 

YOU think 



? 




Lett: Freshmen get a chance Co participate in organizations and 
tliihs that are active at Boston College. Here students are su|v 
porting a petition to advance Asian Languages at BC to levels 
higher than the intermediate where they currently stop. Photo 

h\ Annie 1j( 




Left: The best thing about being a freshmen is meet- 
ing new friends and going to parries. Freshmen hall- 
ways leave their dorm doors open and the dorms are 
always friendly. Here, two friends dress up to go to a 
party as rockstars. Phuto .submillcJ. 




Far left: Freshmen friends and roommates hang out 
in the dorms. Here friends surprise another friend 
on her birthday. New and lasting friendships are 
built tkiring the freshmen year. Photo submitted 



Above: After the Red Soxs had beat the New York 
Yankees, the freshmen rushed Upper Campus with 
excitement and joy. The crowd could be heard 
yelling "Yankees suck." Photo submitted 



Left: Freshmen also learned to explore Boston. 
Here a group of friends go out on a Friday night. 
Freshmen soon find out how fun the social seen can 
be in the city of Boston. Photo submitted 




"From the get-gc) I loved 
it here at Boston College. 
I knew this was where I 
wanted to be since I was a 
sophomore in high school. 
It's a great place." - Rachel 
Whidden, CSOM '08 




"The transition has been 
hard for me and at first I 
missed home a lot. But all 
the friendly people I have 
met, especially the girls on 
my floor, have made me 
feel more at home at BC." 
-Esther Adetunji, A&S '08 



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"I think that Boston 
College offers so many 
opportunities and activities 
to help the adjustment into 
college life from retreats to 
peer advising to seminar 
groups. There's always a 
helping hand somewhere." 
- Eugene Kim, A&S '08 




"Freshmen year has gone by 
so fast. For me, it has felt 
great to be on my own and 
to explore Boston." 
- Austin Bogus, A&S '08 



Sriirjpnf life 99 



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You've all heard their names: Lower Live, Lyons, Hillside, 
Eagle's Nest, Carney, Stewart, Starbucks, and The Balcony. 
You've wandered into them for breakfast, lunch, dinner, 
and in-between, searching for the meal that best suits your crav- 
ings. You have a favorite for different times of the day, days of the 
week, or particular activities. Whatever dining hall you prefer for 
whatever reason, the consensus is that Boston College dining usu- 
ally leaves its students satisfied. 

This year, BC Dining made some changes to try to en- 
hance the students' dining experiences around campus. Healthier 
options at late night, set prices on previously weighed products, 
more vegetarian meals, and "The Balcony" ate all additions BC 
Dining made in attempt to improve upon previous years. Despite 
these changes, the dining halls still serve many old favorites, such 
as Hillside's paninis, blazing bowls, and chicken fingers. In addi- 
tion to offering good dining, the dining halls continue to provide 
enjoyable atmospheres for both socializing and studying. Their 
prime locations make them easy gathering places for friends, study 
groups, and clubs. You're bound to find a familiar face while walk- 
ing through Eagle's Nest to get your mail, running into Lyons for a 
late lunch, or sipping on coffee at Hillside. 

The dining halls are also well staffed. Students are em- 
ployed to work at the dining halls and can even work up to manag- 
ing positions. The chefs always try to serve delightful meals and 
overall, the dining halls are kept as clean as possible. Although 
there have been a few complaints about the high price of dining 
hall food, overall, there seems to be nothing but good things that 



come from exploring the wonderful 
-Lara Philips 



worlu () 



fBC 



Oining 



,1 




Top: Hillside Cafe is the newest dining 
facility at Boston College. The cafe offers 
a variety of fresh sandwiches, coffee, and 
other tasty selections rare to Carney's 
or Eagle's Nest. Photo by Annie Lu 




Top: One o( the tnvoritc meals of the 
main dining halls is the Late Night Selec- 
tion which usually occurs after 8:00 
PM. Everyone's personal favorite are the 
chicken fingers! Photo by Elizabeth Ethun 




Top: The dining facilities also offer 
a wide variety of candy from candy 
com to sour peaches to Reese's Pieces. 
The prices, though, can be rather 
high. Photo fry Elizabeth Ethun 



Top: The dining facilities and cafe shops such as the Cafe 
in McElroy offer a convenient location for friends to 
meet up and chat. Usually, the cafes offer many drinks 
from smoothies to Starbucks. Photo by Annie hu 



"I like Hillside because the 
Tuna Delight is absolutely 
delightful." 
-Justin Ng '07 




"I enjoy the chicken 
cordon blue. Ham and 
chicken make for a killer 
combination." -Ralph 

Veenema '06 



■-■^ 



"The school has a wide 
variety of food choices for 
the students but. it can get 
pretty repetitive after a 
while." 
- Brian Moy, A&S '07 



"Whoever thoughi 
night is genius. It 
erything a college 
would crave whili 



Far Right: The machines might be 
old, but for most students, they get 
the job done, and they olTer the fu 
range of motion needed to build 
muscles. Photo by Anne Lu. 

Right: Mats are used for stretching, ab 

work, and even yoga ball excercises. 

There are even ab rollers to help keep 

diose abs tight! Photo h\ AiiTie Lii. 

Below: One of the best things about 
the plex is the huge court area. A vol- 
leyball net is set up while still leaving 
plenty of space for shooting hoops. 
Photo b)' Anne Lu. 




Above: While the Plex is dominated 

by tennis and basketball courts, there 

is little space for the lifting and cardio 

machines. Photo by Anne Lu. 

Right: People are always waiting in 
line for the eliptical machines or the 
treadmills. They are some of the most 
popular things at the plex. Photo by 
Anne Lu. 



How do YOU 



Feel about the 



a 



X and 



its USAGES? 



FLYNN 




The William J. Flynn Recreation Complex was 
named in honor of the long-time athletic direc- 
tor who was associated with Boston College as 
a student-athlete, faculty member, coach and athletic 
director for nearly seventy years, including a thirty-four 
year tenure as athletic director from 1957 to 1991. But 
the average Boston College student probably is not 
aware of the history. The average BC student just knows 
the large building with the odd-shaped roof as the Plex. 
While there are some students who have never 
been inside the building, many know the interior very 
well and can explain exactly where one would go to use 
its many facilities and services, including the eight-lane 
swimming pool, the tennis courts, the 1/8 mile track and 
the basketball courts - just to name a few. The Plex 
also offers a wide variety of group exercise classes such 
as cardiovascular training classes, weight training and 
toning, and mind and body classes. If anything, it seems 
that the Plex offers too much. The main complaint stu- 
dents put forth is that the Plex is just way too crowded. 
Though in obvious need of some renovation and expan- 
sion, the Plex provides a valuable asset to the BC com- 
munity. 
-Kerri Clark 



"I love the raquetball 

courts. Raquetball is by far 

my favorite thing to do at 

the plex. Any one want to 

play?" 

- Ben Knappmiller, '05 



" The aerobics classes are 
fun to go to and usually 
have great variety." 
-Elizabeth Harper '08 









"They've got some great 
machines, but it can get 
really crowded at certain 
times. " 
-Lauren Zaccone, '08 



"The plex has hand-me- 
down machines." 
- Marcela Sosa '05 . 




SriiHenr 1 ife 



Space for student parking is 
extremely limited on campus and is 
usually reserved for Lynch and nurs- 
ing students who need to travel for 
prepracs. 

While there are some bicycles around 

campus, most students find it easier 

and more convenient to walk from 

class to class. 




Cars dot the parking lot outside Conte Forum 



Bus stops are scattered throughout the campus 
as half of the freshman commute between 
the main and Newton campus and most oil 
campus students use the Commonwealth bus 



Transportation & Parking 



Getting from point A to point B should not be that 
difficult. But with the new parking restrictions on 
campus, even those lucky enough to have a car 
know that it is not always easy. Campus security has re- 
inforced new rules about driving through campus making 
parking tickets a daily occurrence. Students have found 
new places to park to avoid long walks to classes such as lo- 
cal shops, however, parking tickets are very prevalent with 
this method. 

Both the Massachusetts Bay Transportation 
Authority (MBTA) and Boston College provide 
transportation services to BC students to ensure no 
one is stranded on campus, hut sometimes those can 
be as inconvenient as BC parking. Usually, several 
Commonwealth Buses and Newton Campus Buses 
route through the campus on intervals to provide 
convenient transportation. But the buses can run 
late or be extremely crowded. Also, unpredictable 
Boston weather makes it very likely that students will 
be waiting in the rain or snow. Parking on campus or 
off campus can be extremely expensive, but the cost is 
overridden by the conveniences of having a car mak- 
ing transportation quicker and easier. So what is a 
young college student to do? Inventive students can 
always find ways and Boston College students know 
how to solve that little conundrum. 
'Kerri Clark 



How did YOU get around? 







"The bus system is fine 
until you are already run- 
ning late and you sprint 
to the bus only to sit 
there for fifteen minutes 
while the bus driver reads 
a magazine. ..that is the 
best." -Braden Danbury 



"When you don't need 

the bus, it's fine. When 

you need to get to class, 

the bus driver takes a long 

break..." 

- John Demichei '08 



"Overall, the transporta- 
tion system at BC is pretty 
efficient and reliable es- 
pecially during the busy 
school hours between 7 am 
and 3 pm. 
-Michael Welch '06 



"The buses are the worst 
when it is raining or in the 
snow but it is much better 
than walking." 
-Julie Jong '08 



Far right: Snidents sometimes study 
or read outside before classes when the 
weather permits in the early fall or late 
spring. Photo by Bob McGrath Studio 

Right: The lounge in the dorms are 
also a great place to study. Generally, 
they are quiet and many students study 
there. Photo by Bob McGrath Studio 

Bottom: The libraries are also very 
popular places of study. They provide 
desks and chairs for a large amount of 
students. Photo b\ Bob McGrath Studio 




Top: Students go to O'Neill Library in 
betxveen classes to read or to do some 
work before relaxing. Photo submitted 



How do 

do you think 



Exams have 



Been?? 



Exams 



f 

I 




Around midterms, exams or finals, Boston College 
students can he found, some sleeping, but most, 
studying in the lihraries or lounges of the dorms. 
Most students can also be found cursing or complaining 
about the work they have to do, or how tired they 
are. Most students are also high on caffeine. Either or, 
students hate exams. Exams and tests may count for the 
majority of grades which makes the event so stressful. 

The seats and desks available at the lihraries are 
usually filled around the times of the exams. Sometimes 
students are even forced to sit on the floor of the 
libraries. Other students study in louder areas such as 
dining halls, the Eagle's Nest, cafes or outside in the dust 
bowl. Students' own dorms are always a place to study, 
however, most students try to escape the distractions of 
the dorm, which include falling asleep and using AIM. 

Finals are usually weighed more heavily than 
other exams and thus are probably the most stressful 
exams of the year. Final exams usually determine a 
student's grade. However, despite the stress of exams, 
there are places to go to get help with study material. 
The Connors Family Learning Center and the Academic 
Development Center provides free tutoring to the student 
body among a variety of topics with flexible hours. 
Teachers and teacher assistants are usually available with 
office hours to help with the reading material or material 
discussed in class. Lastly, students help other students 
with study material and on homework and class work. 






"I get so stressed out during 
exams and midterms. And 
it always seems that there's 
more stuff to do around 
those dates." 
-Jessica Janoskie, '08 



] 



"1 usually go to Baspt 
Library for several hours 
before exams. Generally, its 
really quiet and peaceful. I 
like it there." 
-Lauren Zaccone, '08 



I hate exams. If it were a 
person, I would kick it in 
the face." 
-Susie Kim, '07 




"I get so distracted, when I 

study in my dorm room. I 

usually go online and start 

doing other stuff. Not 

good." 

-Jeremiah Jones, '06 




.SriiHpnr life 



Volunteers 



A sense of community exists on the Boston College 
campus: we are all eagles. In a broader sense, the student 
body tries to deal with the worldly issues through 
volunteering. It is through volunteering that we find a sense of 
each other and ourselves. Volunteering is putting a Jesuit ideal 
into action. Through organizations and clubs, students enter 
into a world of helping hands, and giving hearts. The Volunteer 
and Service Learning Center promotes and encourages students 
to help out in the Boston area and even abroad. Through 
colleges within the university or through ministry organizations, 
students are able to go to other states or countries to volunteer. 

One of the largest volunteer organizations on campus is 
Appalachia, which participates in trips during breaks to work with 
the poverty stricken of the United States. Other organizations 
such as 4Boston frequently volunteer at locations throughout the 
Boston area for about four hours a week for an entire academic 
year. Both organizations try to commit to the ideal of committing 
to "a faith that does justice." Smaller groups such as Kids 2 
Cents volunteer weekly at Sandra's Lodge, a homeless center, in 
Waltham, Massachusetts, to promote creative art activities and 
writing among children. The children's' writings are eventually 
selected and compiled for a special edition of the Spare Change 
Newsletter. The newsletter frequently addresses issues such as 
homelessness and poverty, taking submissions and contributions 
from writers or those that were or are homeless themselves. 

Volunteering at Boston College has become ingrained in 
most students. By promoting the goodness of others we promote 
the goodness and justice in ourselves. Through helping out the 
Boston Community and parts of the world, the students of this 
university attempt to look for a healthier, more just tomorrow. 
'Nhu Huynh 




O^'vriuvwj^i^ •: ' -■*■ ^ 



FIRE ALARM 

CONTROL PANEL 




t 




What do 

YOU think 



? 



Left: Students at Boston College are active in the com- 
munity and are actively working to change the condi- 
tions of Boston. Here, members of Circle K work with 
pieces of construction paper with children. 




Left: Members of Circle K volunteer at locations 
such as soup kitchens where they help to prepare 
meals for the homeless and of course, clean up after 
their mess. 




Above: It is important during one's childhood to enjoy arts and 
crafts. Here a student volunteers with little kids to make sure that 
they can have that opportunity. Photo submitted 



Left: A student volunteers at a nursery school and smiles with the 
children during a quick break. They have been making picture 
frames out of popsicle sticks and glue. Photo submitted 



Far left: The Campus School serves to provide services to the dis- 
abled students of that school so that they too can have the same 
opportunities that many others have been given. Photo submitted 







"Influenced by Ignatian 
spirituality, BC students 
take time out of their 
academic schedules to 
spend time with handi- 
capped children, serve 
food at a homeless shel- 
ter in Boston, or build 
houses in Appalachia." 
-Mark Russo, A&S '05 



"It's nice to be on a 
campus where community 
service is so common and 
emphasized, whether from 
volunteering in Boston or 
in Jamaica." 
-Jacqui Shelton, A&S '08 



"Service has been a 
fundamental part of my 
education at BC. Though 
my classroom experiences 
have been valuable, it is my 
time given to others that I 
feel has truly molded who I 
am and what I will do with 
my future. I treasure every 
opportunity I get." 
- Jim Conte, A&S '07 



"There are tons of great or- 
ganizations that seek quali- 
fied individuals who want to 
help at BC dealing with an 
array of different situations." 
-Jeremy Esperon, LSOE '07 



NECESSARY TARGETS & 
CREDIBLE WITNESS 
Directed hy Patricia Rig^in 
October 14-17 

THE HOUSE OF YES 

Directed hy Foster Johns '05 
October 21 -23 

SYLVIA 

Directed by Stephanie Marquis '05 

October 28 - 30 

THE SHAKESPEAR PROJECT 
Directed by John Hoiichin 
November 18-21 

THE BOOK OF DAYS 
Directed by Meghan Clinton '05 
January 20-22 

EVENING OF STUDENT WORKS 
Directed by Scott Cummings 
February 23-27 

KEELYANDDU 

Directed by Krista D'Agostino '05 

March 17-19 

BABY WITH THE BATHWATER 
Directed by Crystal Gomes '05 
April 7-9 

THE SHADOWBOX 
Directed by Ellen Pyzelc '05 
April 14-16 

CANDIDE 

Directed by Dr. Sruart Hecht 

April 27 - May 1 



What 
Did 

YOU 

think 



Right: The main production play, performed in the 
fall, Dreaming Shakespeare, included many epi- 
sodes of dance and singing. Photo by Lee Pellegrini 

Bottom: Theater students are a tight knit group 
who hang out of class and shows. Here, the stu- 
dents stop and pose for a shot. Photo subn\itted 

Far Bottom: Dreaming Shakespeare took char- 
acters and speeches in plays hy Shakespeare to 
formulate an unique piece. Photo b> Lee Pellegrini 









'^' 


^^■L 


1 

: 



in the end? 




"1 love Theater people.' 
.Megan Green, '08 




"Theater can reach anyone 
who is willing to sit in a dark 
room and watch it, for cnter- 
i.iinment, education or any- 
ihing in between. Theater can 
invoke tears, laughter, ideas, 
:inger. It can incite a riot. Ii cm 
hring people together." 
< rysiiil Gomes, '05 




Above; The Theater Department offers a variety 
of classes taught by reknowned professionals in 
many areas of concentration. Photo by Annie Lii 

Left: The set and costumes of Dreaming Shake- 
speare were largely contributed and made by student 
designers and constructors. Photo by Lee Pelkgrini 




The development of the Theater Department, in itself, 
is an evolution of acting. Initially, the Dramatics So- 
ciety, formed in 1865, began with two shows per year. 
Classes focusing on Theater subjects began under the Speech 
and Communications Theater Major. The department was 
formed in the 1980's; but the growth continued until 1993 
where it progressed into an independent academic depart- 
ment. Currently, six shows are produced annually by the 
department, and another four to eight shows are produced 
by the Dramatics Society and the Contemporary Theater. 
One of the main productions, a show called Dream- 
ing Shakespeare, shown before Thanksgiving, is an experi- 
mental piece taken from speeches and scenes from the work 
of Shakespeare put together as an original script. There is an 
intense focus on dreams and nightmares. However, the theater 
department also focuses on subjects of history and humanity. 
Necessary Targets, a show about the heart breaking topic of the 
plight of the homeless refugees of Bosnia, collaborated with 
members of the College of Arts and Science and the Boston 
College Law School to enhance authenticity and artistry of the 
production. Spring productions include the musical Candide, 
a satiric production, directed by the department director. Dr. 
Hecht, along with other shows such as Book of Days, Baby 
With the Bathwater, Kelly and Du, and The Shadow Box. 
According to Crystal Gomes '05, "Theater is the 
synthesis of all art forms. It includes speech, dance, visual art, 
music and the written word. Consequently, it is the most pow- 
erful form of art, in my opinion. It can reach anyone who is 
willing to sit in a dark room and watch it, for entertainment, 
education or anything in between." The Theater Depart- 
ment has become a foundation tor involvement and growth 
for students emphasizing the audiences' ability to identify, 
think and feel with the people and the situation on the stage. 
-Nhu Huynh 




"Theatre to me is a constant 
reminder of the significance 
of human relationships to life 
and art." 
Stephanie Marquis, '05 




"The Theater Department is 
such a close knit community 
and such a talented one as well. 
It has made beginning college 
so much nicer." 
Jess Kelly, '08 



SniHpnt T.ifp 



Far Right: Howard Dean was one of 
the most attended speakets this aca- 
demic yeat ptiot to the presidential 
elections. Photo by Heather Matheson 

Right: Boston College has a collec- 
tion of singing groups that perform 
during special events throughout 
the year. Photo i)\ EUzabeth Ethun 

Bottom: Students definitely got a 
lot of laughs at the Funniest Comic 
on the Heights event sponsored 
hy College Republicans of Boston 
College. Photo b\ Justin Knight 




Top: Reverend Kenneth Himes and 
brother, Reverend Michael Himes 
are noted for their great lectures on 
campus. Photo by Suzanne Camarata 



lo was 

your favorite speaker or 



concert this 

Year?? 



ii^ 





& 




Every year, Boston College hosts a variety of events 
that add culture to campus life. Choruses, bands, 
speakers, and even collections of art brought to 
campus give students and faculty a wide array of cultural 
opportunities in which to take part. In correlation 
with the presidential electioii in November, BC held a 
significant number of events on campus this year that 
dealt with political issues. Former presidential candidate 
Howard Dean came to support Senator Kerry in 
September, attracting a large crowd of interested students 
to gather at O'Neill Plaza. In addition to this Democratic 
event, the College Republicans hosted a Republican Gala, 
bringing in many speakers in support of President Bush. 
In addition to political events, BC sponsored 
an assortment of events in other fields. The McMuUen 
Museum of Art held an exhibit on Fernand Khnopff, a 
key figure in the European Symbolist movement. The 
exhibit included many of Khnopff 's most important works 
from the Royal Art Museums in Brussels and private 
collections in Belgium, Switzerland, France, and the 
U.S. The Church in the 21st Century sponsored several 
lectures in regards to faith, including a presentation 
entitled "Adventure of Faith Series: What Dare We Hope 
For? The Resurrection of the Body and Life Everlasting," 
presented by the popular Father Himes. Every once in 
a while, events such as "BC bOp! Lower Live!" come to 
students, bringing culture to their everyday lives. With 
such frequent events like these, cultural experiences on 
campus are easy to come by for Boston College students. 
-Lara Philips 



"I enjoyed the readings 
from the work of Lorrie 
Moore. I thotight she was 
a great speaker." 
-Catherine Chao, '07 



"BC does a good job of 

increasing the awareness 

of its students about things 

going on in the outside 

world." 

-Claire Defilippis '05 



"Cornell West was a much 

needed voice for BC 

students to hear, although 

he gave a more 'radical' 

argument." 

-Nijah Cunningham '07 




tttJIti'tM 



"BC did a better job of 
informing students about 
events on campus this year 
through regular emails and 
announcements." 
-Jen Scully '05 



1 



S n iHent L ifel 



Right: The ALC Ball is usually held 
at very upscale locations such as 
Hotels and Plazas. Annually, students 
gathet and meet all glamotized up 
to have a fun night. Photo Submitted 

Bottom: All students from Boston 
College are invited to attend the 
ALC Ball although tickets usually sell 
out rather quickly. Photo Submitted 




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p-7. ^^'^^^ ^H 




tf 

^ 


1 










li 


■ 


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Top: At the ALC Ball, delicious meals are 
served and catered to students. A vari- 
ety of foods arc available. Photo Submitted 



Top: Friends gather at the ball to hang out and 
have a wonderful night. The ALC sponsors won- 
derful events as such to promote unity among 
all BC students as well as fun. Photo Submittal/ 

Right: Here students are shown hanging oiii 
after dinner at the ALC Ball. As shown, the hall 
has a very elegant atmosphere. Photo SwbmiiteJ 






Every year, the AHANA Leadership Council hosts a 
spring ball to celebrate the diversity of students around 
campus. The ALC Ball gives members of the BC 
community an opportunity to fully appreciate the diversity 
within their school, bringing students of different racial and 
cultural backgrounds together in a formal setting. Those 
who are lucky enough to get tickets to this popular event 
are guaranteed to enjoy a night of food, dancing, and fun. 
Held at the upscale Copley Hotel Plaza, the ALC 
Ball gives students an opportunity to dress up and enjoy 
fine dining, a welcome alternative to the barbequed 
chicken and cold subs available on campus. As senior 
Stephanie Salgado stated, "The ALC Ball is one of the 
only times of year you can dress up, feel classy, and enjoy 
good food and music." Students enjoy a variety of music 
throughout the night, including a lively mix of reggae, 
Latin, and hip-hop hits. The good food, music, and tunes 
leave the crowd satisfied and in high spirits. Overall, the 
uniqueness of the ALC Ball is successful in creating a 
vibrant atmosphere for BC students to dance the night away. 
-Lara Philipps 



How did you enjoy the ball? 




"1 felt like a celebrity. The 
hotel was really high class." 
-Gihee Chung '07 




"There was a good mi.\ ot 
music. The sit down dinner 
was nice, and the crowd was 
just the right size." -Christi 
Anne Camha '06 




"It was just great seeing 
a diverse crowd together 
having a good time." 
-Amanda Amato '07 




"Taking pictures on the 
dance floor with everyone 
having fun." 
-Stephanie Salgado '05 



The Foundations of 

DIVERSITY 



Looking back several decades at 
Boston College's student body, a very 
homogenous group of all male, mostly 
Catholic students would have been found. 
However, the times have changed and so 
have the students. Currently, we find a much 
more diverse student body and a university 
that tries to accommodate its students 
through programs, classes, and organizations. 
The term AHANA was coined in 1979 by 
two students, Alfred Feliciano and Valerie 
Lewis. These students objected to the name 
"Office of Minority Programs," then used by 
Boston College, citing the definition of the 
word minority as "less than." They proposed, 
instead, to use the term "AHANA" which 
they felt embraced the cultural differences 
present in our society and the student body. 
AHANA is an acronym used to describe 
individuals of African-American, Hispanic, 
Asian and Native American descent. 
The University tries its best to 
provide a wide variety of services that nurture 
students of AHANA descent through 
academic, social, cultural, and spiritual 
development which is also the mission of the 
Office of the AHANA Student Programs 
and the AHANA Leadership Council. 
Entering students at Boston College find 
many clubs or activities to join to celebrate 
the rich complexity and variance among 
cultures and histories. Every school year 
begins with the ALC Boat Cruise followed by 
other events such as the ALC retreat, Asian 
Pacific Islander Community Awareness 
Retreat, Black Family Weekend, Caribbean 
Culture Club Service trip, Hispanic Alumni 
Weekend, OLAA Volunteer Day, and much 
more. The activities are sponsored by a 
number of clubs such as the Asian Caucus, 



Boston College NAACP Black Student 
Forum, Organization of Latin American 
Affairs, and many many more, all of which 
try to facilitate a sense of campus unity 
and awareness on campus. The clubs and 
organizations try to facilitate both a sense 
of spirituality and sense of self along with 
preparing not only AHANA students but 
all students to accommodate to the diverse 
work field and world. These organizations 
continue to create new events, invent ideas 
and plan activities to celebrate what would 
not have been found decades ago at Boston 
College. The clubs and organizations address 
many of the problems and are a source of 
advising for younger .or entering students. 
A person could not look at Boston 
College without realizing the changing and 
evolving student body that challenges not 
only the problems of the University but of 
the nation. The students of Boston College 
are integrated into a rich environment of 
diversity where students are thus able to 
learn from one another's experiences and 
lives. Through the University, relations 
are gained concerning what is like to be 
an AHANA student in the 21" century. 
Accordingly, the student body as a whole 
is more understanding and better prepared 
to face the problems among race, culture, 
and social differences because of the active 
organizations and programs run by the ALC 
and Office of AHANA Student Programs. 
'Nhu Huynh 




Student Life 



-Blazers and jackets made 
of tweed or other patterns 
like plaid 

-Long earrings with stones 
with an antique finish 



-Ugg boots in a variety of 
colors worn with skirts or 
with jeans 



-Boston College Hoodies 
and hats 



-Polo shirts worn unders 
sweaters or long sleeved 
shirts 



•\ , j 




Right: The students of Boston College weat a vari- 
ety of attires reflecting the different personalities 
and tastes among the students of BC. Photo b)i Bob 
McGrath Studio 

Bottom: Later in the fall, students begins to wear 
sweaters and hoodies. The wind chill in Boston 
can get pretty cold. Pfioto t;y Bob McGrath Studio 

Far Bottom: Layering clothes, mainly shirts, is 
another fashionable technique used by students 
to keep warm in the late fall. Photo hy Bob McGrath 
Studio 



m 




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wear 



your clothes ? 



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* - 


"BC fashion? It's like opening 
up the pages of a catalog- what 
vou see on the pages is what 
vou see on campus. Kids are 
-o put together!" - Carolyn 
I'ohmcr, LSOE'05 


^n| 


1 personally prefer just 
throwing on Boston College 
^^^eatshirt with some jeans 
e\x-rydiiy." 
-Cniig Binder, A&S '07 


■ 




1 














Left: Sweaters are a must m Boston. Hooded 
sweaters were fashionable this season in a variety 
oh McGmth Sn<dio 



Top: Large totes either in pattern or plain to carry 
books were also fashionable as well jean jackets 
and blazers. Photo by Bob McGrath Studio 




The Boston College community is made up 
ot thousands of individuals, each with his 
or her own unique sense of style and taste. 
But of course, we are all subject to the whims of the 
fashion world, and many of us pick up on, or lead, 
the latest trends and fads - whether it be dressing 
up for an evening out on the town, or playing it 
down when we head off to class or lounge around 
in the dorms. So what were the trends of the 2004- 
2005 school year? Both the men and women of 
Boston College found a way to sport Polo - short- 
sleeves, long-sleeves, sweaters, hats, bags... The 
familiar logo could be seen all over campus (collars 
turned up, of course). Ugg boots and North Face 
gear retained their popularity for another year, 
and many students owned a pair (or two) of Nike's 
fashionable Shox running sneakers. Girls fell in 
love with big and bright jewelry reminiscent of 
the 1980's, and faux pearls graced the necklines 
of many a BC lady. But of course, BC'ers never 
hesitated to play it down - sweatpants, pajamas, 
and athletic-wear are always acceptable "outfits" for 
weekends and school days alike. And as you take a 
walk around campus you notice, as always, students 
showing their colors through clothing decorated 
with the school name we are all so proud to display. 
'Alicia True 



T7^ 



COLLEGE i\] 




"My favorite store to shop at 
IS J. Crew. They have perfect 
sweaters and scarves for Boston 
weather." 
Catherine Chao 




"Sporting Red Soxs hats, jer- 
seys, or memorabilia is neces- 
sary especially since they won 
the World Series this year! My 
Red Sox hat is my favorite. " 
-Steve Laycock, CSOM '06 



Sriidenr life 




WINTER 




Spring Break is a college tradition. From as early as 
September, students are planning their getaways. 
It is easy to get caught up in the enthusiasm. 
All through January and February, that week 
in March is looming ahead like a trophy at the end 
of a hard race. Everyone seems to be eagerly awaiting 
that week where homework, exams, and papers are 
nonexistent. School work falls to the wayside and 
students get to be just kids who want to have fun. 
For that one wonderful week, students are transported 
from a usually soggy and depressing Massachusetts 
winter to wanner and more entertaining climates. 
Whether you go someplace warm like the 
Bahamas, the Dominican Republic, or Mexico or 
someplace further like London, Paris, or Amsterdam, 
Spring Break is a college ritual. Even if you end up in the 
back of your parents' car heading home, you still get the 
time off to relax — something you won't be guaranteed 
after graduation when you join the working world. 
Something else that we should treasure while 
we're still here at BC is Christmas break. Now at four 
glorious weeks, it is totally unlike the pre-coUegiate 
Christmas. Not only do we get more time off, but we 
have few commitments and little work to be completed. 
Between semesters there are honestly not too many 
responsibilities placed on the shoulders of the BC 
student. Some choose to work, others choose to travel 
and others choose to lounge, but no mat 
decision, it is always eagerly anticipated bVstu^^#ts 
-Kerri Clark 









>,-^l'il , « ..»^' .—"='■ 






\i 




'-"* ■ ' ,<3!\, J** 1^^ 





do 



YOU 



think? 



Lett: Elizabeth Ethun, yearbook guru, went so 
lar as Greece during her breaks! Such locations 
explored historical and cultural landmarks as well as 
ancient sites and monuments. Students who visited 
Greece often travel to other countries in Europe. 




Left: During Spring and even Summer Break stu- 
dents from Appalachia, one of the largest clubs 
on campus, go on trips and participate in building 
projects and helping the less fortunate establish 
homes and a better way to live along the east coast. 



Top: Travel is of course normal during Winter 
and Spring Break. Students use transpor- 
tation methods such as trains, airplanes 
and buses. Here, Elizabeth Ehtun '05, trav- 
els across Europe with her large backpack. 

Far Left: During Spreak Break in March, it 
is normal for students to visit warm weather 
locations such as Mexico, Florida, the Carib- 
bean and so on. These seniors lay out 
on a boat in the beautiful seas of Mexico. 

Left: Spring Break Is a the perfect time for groups 
of friends to travel and relax, especially in sunny 
locations near the beach. Student associations 
at BC can help plan and organize dates and pay- 
ments for such trips in the spring and winter time. 




"I really enjoyed my trip to 
the French Alps my sopho- 
more year during winter 
break." 
-Stacey Johnson, '07 




"When you study abroad, 
especially in Europe, you 
have the opportunity to 
visit landmarks and an- 
cient sites that can't be 
found anywhere else." 
-Michael Binder, '06 




"During spring break, I usu- 
ally go to Florida, around 
Key West or Tampa." 
-Rachel Wihidden, '08 




lffff^fl| ': 



"There's always the option 
of volunteering during 
breaks through clubs and 
organizations, which makes 
your time a bit more pro- 
ductive." 
-Sam Warner, '05 



Snirlpnr life 121 




Hoi I ["day - a day of freedom from labor; day set aside for 
leisure or recreation; vacation. As if we need reminding of 
the definition of this term! And we certainly take advantage 
of the days "set aside for leisure" during our days here at BC. The first 
holiday we encounter during our first days back at school is Labor 
Day, which usually just grants us more time to unpack, decorate our 
rooms, and put off classes for another few precious hours. A month 
or so down the line, BC'ers enjoy time off for Columbus weekend, 
which for many involves a trip home to see the parents, or maybe 
just an extra day added on to the usual weekend festivities! One 
of our highly celebrated holidays at Boston College is Halloween, 
where students get to show off their creativity and outdo each 
other with inventive and original (or not so original) costumes. At 
BC, Halloween usually gets stretched out to last a full weekend, so 
students have several nights to hit up on-campus costume parties 
and special events at Boston bars and clubs. For Thanksgiving, 
most BC students head home to spend some quality time with their 
families... and to finally get in a good meal! This year, many students 
came back to school early to attend the BC versus Syracuse football 
game held at Alumni Stadium on the Saturday of Thanksgiving 
weekend. The rest enjoyed a relaxing weekend at home, catching 
up with family and old friends. And then finally, after a semester 
of hard work and a couple weeks of cramming for exams, Boston 
College students are off to Winter Break! Of course here and there, 
we like to throw in a few extras... 2 1st Birthdays, Toxic Tuesdays, 
Notre Dame weekends... a few unofficial holidays of our own. 
-Alicia True 




Above: During the Christmas Tree Lighting, 
Santa Claus took pictures with fellow students to 
celebrate the Christmas tradition of asking Santa 
Clause for presents under the Christmas Tree. 




Above: Students gathered in early Decem- 
ber to celebrate Christmas during the lighting 
of the tree on campus. Students were given 
beverages and got into the Christmas .spirii. 




Above: Halloween costumes can also 
be used to mock others. These two 
seniors dressed up as typical Boston 
College girls by wearing Ugg Boots, 
name brand purses and polo shirts. 



Above: Halloween is a great time to dress up and 
invite original costume designs. Accordingly, the girls 
of Cheverus Dormitory got into the spirit by dress- 
ing up as butterflies, cats, pumpkins and bumble bees. 



'IJJJ 



"Even for students who 
don't celebrate Christmas, 
there's always a menorah 
here or there." 
-David Ritzer, '08 



Sfe. 



"I love pumpkin pie and I 
love Thanksgiving because 
on Thanksgiving my mom 
makes pumpkin pie." 
-Lauren Zaccone, '08 



«r 



We> 



"I love to decorate my 
dorms with Christmas 
lights and my mini Ch 
mas tree." 
-Thayer Surrette, '08 



"O- '■' 



"Halloween is funi 
people procrastina 
their costumes and end 
just wearing whatever 
in their closets in abs 
combinations." 
-David Kim, '06 



.ShidpnrT.ife I 



Far right: Boston weather can he 
beautiful in the early or late fall 
or the spring, when there is no 
rain. PJioto by Bob McGrath Snidio 

Right: Rain occurs \'ery frequently 
in Boston and can lead to a lot of pre- 
cipitation or snow. Here, two friends 
go out in the rain. P/ioto submitted 

Bottom: The first days of snow were 
met with dread, hut the year's first 
snow in mid No\'emher actually came 
considerably late. Photo by Annie Lii. 




Above: The cold weather forces BC 
students to bundle up in heavy jack- 
ets and hoodies. Pholo by Annie: Lu 



about Boston's ^g^^j^^^„ 




"It's cold, it's hot... who 
knows until you go 
outside!" -Caitlin Arnould 



"One time it took my 
boyfriend and me over 
an hour to get to a play 
in Boston because of a 
heavy snowstorm. The T 
was closed and the public 
transportation was all really 
backed up." 
-Liz Volney '06 



WEATHER 



Oh, the joys of Boston weather! One minute you're 
enjoying a sunny walk through O'Neill Plaza, the 
next, you're desperately trying to hold onto your 
umbrella in the torrential downpour through the dustbowl. 
Although the morning forecast may call tor full winter gear, 
by midday you'll be wishing you hadn't put away your flip flops 
or other summer favorites. Boston weather is as unpredictable 
as it gets, providing for a different kind of excitement at BC. 

BC students have learned to live with Boston's 
unpredictable weather, ready to face whatever it has in store 
for them. Sophomore Glenn Moody advises to "prepare 
for the worst, so that way you can be ready for anything." 
Although students from out of town, particularly from warm 
locations, often have trouble adjusting to the dreadful winters 
and extreme climate changes, the weather is something 
they have come to love. Junior Jimmy Kwak even recalls 
students from out of town taking pictures of their first snowfall 
and being excited about making their first snow angels. 

Sometimes, the irregularity of Boston weather is what 
it takes to make your day more exciting. There's nothing like 
waking up to five feet of snow on the ground, or seeing lower 
campus get flooded in rain to liven up your day. Although 
these weather extremes can make it hard to move around 
campus, and no, school probably won't get cancelled; they are 
part of what makes Boston an exciting place to go to school! 
'Lara Philips 



' ' "I was out for a run in the 

ji rain one day in the middle 

V^ of March. About half-way 

"^ through my run, the rain 

somehow turned into a 

"~ blizzard. The wind was 

i so strong I couldn't keep 

my eyes open for my run 

home!" 

-Dotsy Zirkle '07 

"It's funny seeing people 
from the warmer weather 
locations taking pictures of 
the first snowfall." 
-Jimmy Kwak '06 



Fnr right: Fenway Park is one of the 
largest tourist sites in the city. The 
Red Soxs had a great season and won 
the World Series for the first time in 
86 years. Photo by Bob McGrach Studio. 

Bottom: Boston has many historical 
sites that give the city its own culture. 
The city has many statues of historical 
figures. Photo b\' Bod McGrntli Stiidid 





WF TifliiT/'ijflf iTlfBili „ . -_-Ii • _ 



■ ■ 




Above: Being near the water, Boston's Harbors arc a 
good site for tourism and for organizations of Boston 
College to hold events. Photo (ry Bob McGraih Studio 



Above: The Boston Harbor during the day is a beau- 
tiful place. The harborusually docks manyboats thai 
tourists can cruise on. Photo by Bob McGrath Studio 



Right: Other hi.stotical sites usually have attractions 
including people who play characters from colonial 
days and reinact histotical events. Photo by Boh 
McGrath Studio 





Arguably one of the best things about going to Boston Col- 
lege is not getting to ride the Comm. Ave. bus, but being 
able to take it to the T and then take that into Boston. 
Full of museums, history, sports teams, restaurants, bars, and clubs, 
Boston is the perfect place to be while you're in college. While 
so mariy of us at BC come from the surrounding areas and are 
familiar with the pleasures of this great city, many of us also come 
from cross-country or other countries and are just beginning to 
get a taste of the flavor Beantown. Fiiiding something creative 
and cultural in Boston is easy. The cultural scene of Boston is 
plentiful and caters to students. The Boston Museum of Fine Art 
admits students free on certain days, and finding cheap symphony 
and play tickets is easy too. The history of Boston is also natu- 
rally the history of our country, and we have so much access to 
historic sites and information that other people travel from miles 
around just to come see. In the mood for fresh seafood? How 
about legitimate Italian? Head on down to the Wharf to Legal 
Seafood where the prices might be steeper, but the raw oysters and 
fresh catches can't be beat. Or pass the Big Dig (which is finally 
over, sort of, kind of, not really) on your way to the North End, 
where you will find a plethora of authentic Italian restaurants, 
waiting for you to pick your personal favorite. Don't forget to 
stop by Mike's Pastry shop on the way home either, for some of the 
best pastries around. And of course, what better place to be than 
Boston when the Red Sox ended the curse by winning the World 
Series for the first time in 86 years? No doubt about it, whether 
you're fan of opera, oysters, or Ortiz, Boston is the place to be. 



What makes Boston great? 



? 




"1 loved all the historical 
sites. Boston is just an old 
city and I just love all the 
history it has." 
-Carolyn Smith, '08 




"1 thmk the best thing 
about Boston is the people, 
which is mainly college 
kids. The city is comfort- 
able but lively." 
-Peter Cowgill, '07 




"I love shopping in Boston. 
I think Newbury Street is 
the best place in Boston. " 
-Lindsey Kindel, '08 




ORTIZ TIKl.^.' MIIWR 



"I really love the Boston 
Red Sox. This was such a 
great year for them.." 
-John Shin, '06 



The Foundations of 

SPIRITUALITY 



As we all know Boston Col- 
lege is a Jesuit institution, 
founded on the principles of 
St. Ignatius. There are over 50 Jesuits 
connected with the college, who either 
teach, work in administrative positions, 
are visiting scholars, or are graduate 
students themselves. A dedication to 
education, learning, questioning and 
growing are the foundational frame- 
works of BC thanks to its founders and 
current members of the Jesuit Com- 
munity that keep it up. As the Jesuit 
Institute states, "The Catholic Jesuit 
university is founded upon the convic- 
tion that the religious and the academic 
are intrinsically related." Starting as a 
small educational facility to accommo- 
date the growing number of Catholics 
in Boston, BC has expanded to all areas 
of study for students of all faith back- 
grounds. The strong Catholic emphasis 
is hard to miss, however. The names of 
buildings, the statues in Gasson, as well 
as St. Mary's Hall on the main campus 
and the Barat House on the Newton 
campus all attest to the influence and 
presence of the Catholic Church. So 
what does this mean for us as students 
at BC? As the core curriculum will 
attest, spirituality is an important part 
of the academic and personal growth of 
BC students. Each student is required 
to take 2 semesters of a theology course, 
along with other standard educational 
requirements. In many ways, this is one 



of the attractive things about BC for 
prospective students. "I was impressed 
by the integration of intellectual and 
spiritual focus in the curriculum when 
applying to BC," Chrissy Wain, '05 said. 
Catholic students also find it very easy to 
attend masses around campus at differ- 
ent times during the week, which allows 
them to become familiar with the Jesuit 
Community outside of a classroom. 
Many service and religious groups, such 
as Appalachia Volunteers and Intervar- 
sity Christian Fellowship, also find a 
basis in the Christian and Jesuit ideals 
of faith and spirituality. However, many 
students are uncomfortable in such spe- 
cifically Catholic surroundings. Students 
of differing faith backgrounds sometimes 
find it hard to avoid the Catholic influ- 
ence in classes as well as around campus. 
However, the foundations of spirituality 
at BC enable students of today's modem 
culture to discover, enhance, and utilize 
their own spirituality in a world that is 
craving spiritual guidance of its own. 
Even though as a higher educational 
institution of the 21st century, BC has 
changed drastically from its original 
structure, and the emphasis on faith and 
spiritual growth intrinsic to the Jesuit 
foundations is something each student 
can appreciate and from which we can 
all learn. 
'Elizabeth Ethun 



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ORGANIZATIONS 

Edited By: 

DorlMilIer 

VyVyVo 



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va 



f ^^^^^^ he goal of a Jesuit education is to develop "men and 
women for others." Boston College certainly achieves 
this objective with each and every class that comes to 
the Heights. For evidence, one need not look any further than the more 
than two hutidred registered cluhs and organizations on campus. Each 
group devotes countless hours to their mission of enhancing student life 
at BC through a variety of opportunities. The largest category is hy far 
that of volunteer organizations and service trips, an excellent reflection 
of our Jesuit values. There is no community service requirement imple- 
mented by the university and yet hy the completion of one's undergradu- 
ate career, nearly 70% of that student's class has done one form of service 
through the school. Whether it is going with 500 other BC students to 
the Appalachia region to build houses for the underprivileged, working at 
a soup kitchen right at home in Boston, or traveling as tar across the globe 
on in international service trip, there are no limits to what the determi- 
nation of each group can achieve. Government, intercultural, leadership, 
performance, political, media and religious organizations are all highly 
visible on campus. Their hard work brings iii countless speakers, dances, 
concerts, and activities to attend away from the stress of school work. 
These organizations provide students with the opportunity to develop 
their talents and interests as well as build friendships with students, 
faculty and the greater Boston community. MaWsa Fusco ani. M^ra C}\a\ 



The Underg 



LJOBoC: 



ostOn College 



The Undergraduate Government of Boston 
College (UGBC) has the duty to take an ac- 
tive role in the governance of our university. 
The UGBC is committed to protecting the interests 
and opinions of the student body at large, as well as to 
serve as the collaborative voice for the students. Each 
member ot UGBC belongs to one of a variety of depart- 
ments or groups within the government. These depart- 
ments and groups include Student Life, University Is- 
sues, Programming, Communications, Finance, Social 
and Cultural Issues, Mentoring Leadership Program, 
AHANA Leadership Academy, the Executive, Legisla- 
tive Directors, and the AHANA Leadership Council. 
Under the leadership of President Grace Simmons 
and Vice President Burnell Holland, this year's UGBC 
took on the mission to be wholeheartedly commit- 
ted to helping Boston College continue to build and 
strengthen a community that is morally grounded in 
the principles of justice, love, and service, and more- 
over guided by an overarching concern for the enrich- 
ment of student life. An important aspect of UGBC is 
the programs and events it puts together for students. 
The Undergraduate Government is dedicated to serv- 
ing the students of Boston College and continuing to 
improve the everyday life of each and every person on 
campus. 




Photos submitted by Frank Qatto & Justin Thornton 






"A.S UGBC Prciident, every Jay has 

been a joy and a challenge. I couldn't 

imagine a more fulfilling experience." 

-Grace Simmons , President 



President Grace Simmons 

and 

Vice President Burnell Holland 



"Service to the Bunion C;ollct;e coninui- 

nity throii(;li UG BG is the rent I pay to he 

a student at BC, and I absolutely love it." 

-Justin Thornton, Chief of Staff 








A H^^elNf A 




The AHANA Leadership Council (ALC) was 
created in the Spring of 1995 with the mis- 
sion of providing leadership and service to the 
AHANA community. In addition, the AHANA Lead- 
ership Council has sought to be a means of support to 
all AHANA clubs and organizations in a collective ef- 
fort to uplift the community politically, academically, 
and socially. As part of the Undergraduate Government 
of Boston College (UGBC), the AHANA Leadership 
Council works to insure that the interests and needs of 
AHANA students are voiced and heard. The AHANA 
Leadership Council is truly establishing its presence at 
Boston College. Through increased communication 
' and stronger relationships with the Undergraduate 
Government of Boston College and the greater Boston 
College community, legitimacy is established. With 
increased forums, rallies, and discussions, education is 
established. Through service and leadership, compas- 
sion is established. Together with other multicultural 
clubs, the AHANA Leadership Council organizes and 
hosts such events as the AHANA Boat Cruise and the 
AHANA Ball. The AHANA Leadership Academy is a 
part of ALC, providing training, resources, and advice 

to emergii^ig AHANA freshman leaders. 



rofessor Mark Anthony Neal came to BC on October 14 to give 



lecture on racLsm, hip hop, and youth activism- 
Photos submitted by M^Hanh Tran 



Organizations 



EIvl F T^*^! NG 

* ^-^ ^ -^^ -"^Leaders Program"*^ -*- ^ ^ — ^ 




The Emerging Leaders Pro- 
gram (ELP) is a one year 
leadership development 
program for a select group of fifty 
freshman students. The program 
is run out of the Office of the 
Dean for Student Development, 
and is designed to help first-year 
students adjust to college life and 
develop enhanced interpersonal 
skills. ELP meets weekly to discuss 
leadership and service issues and 
concerns. Topics include inter- 
cultural awareness anci diversity, 
group dynamics, leadership devel- 
opment, decision making, and 
social justice and volunteerism. 












s 


The Emerging Leaders Program is designed 
to instill an attitude of social awareness and 
responsibility. ELP hopes that the students who 
complete the program will he prepared to assume 
roles of thoughtful responsibility in the Boston j 
College community and throughout their lives. 











Photos suhmittcA. by ELP 




I 



Wl 



AVY/ 

Leadership Program ^ 





Shaw House is the home ot 
the twenty members of the 
Shaw Leadership Program. 
They spend the first year in weekly 
leadership sessions, and then use what 
they have learned to create and 
complete their own leadership proj - 
ects. With the goals of completing 
community service and pervading 
the Shaw spirit throughout Boston 
College, these twenty students, 
along with the sophomore, junior, 
and senior members of the Shaw 
Leadership Program, embark on a 
year filled with memorable events. 




f*hoIn by .Andrt'if Lo^an 



' 


I i 


MK^ 




r^V, 




^mir*^k 


i. 




Hrli 


\ ^' 




Y^ '1 


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1 


1 




The road to leadership is filled with service 

to others, Shaw members learned, and they 

are better ec]uippei.l to walk down ib.ii paih 

with the skills they have learned and ilie 

friendships they have made in the house. 




2vlE]SIX'"~^^ TNG 

.1^ ▼ -1^ » ^ -1- ^i Leadership Prosram ^ -*- -*- ^» ^ — ^ 




The Mentoring Leadership 
Program is a leadership 
program involving over 
fifty freshman, created to continue 
the process of fostering leadership 
skills. This is achieved through 
leadership workshops, a retreat, a 
series of community service activi- 
ties arid most importantly, a pair- 
ing of the members with a cabinet 
member of UGBC. The goal of the 
program is to give a better insight 
into the student government of 
BC and prepare the members to 
assume leadership roles in UGBC 
and other aspects ot campus. 





"Drawing on our passion, resourcefulness, disci- |; 
pline, organization, and communication, we wi 
develop not only a deep understanding of the needs 
of the BC commuiiity, but also an acute ability to ,, 
meet them, all in a spirit of service to our fellow I 
person." -part ofMLP's Mission Statement 






hoice On Campus 





A 





nother Choice on Cam- 
pus (ACC) provides 
.monthly on-campus ac- 
tivities for the BC student body. 
From Karaoke Nights to Talent 
Shows, the organization provides 
a wide range of interactive activi- 
ties, striving to build a great Bos- 
ton College community through 
creating a fuii and safe environ- 
ment for all students. ACC is a 
great opportunity for leadership, 
experience, arid opportunities to 
participate in a variety of events. 
All events are free, and involve 
great food and entertainment for 
everyone. 



Colleen Raleigh, senior co-president, orga- il 

nized the highly successful Boston College Ij 

Talent Show in 2002 and 2003. She also I 

presided over a shift in the mission of ACC f. 

towards emphasizing the common connections S 

between members of a diverse community. I 




Photos submitted by Joe Bowden 




Drganizatinns t35 



4BOSTON 







4 Boston is a volunteer organiza- 
tion that utilizes undergradu- 
ate students who are willing to 
serve in Boston's homeless shelters, 
soup kitchens, inner-city schools, 
youth centers, hospitals, and live- 
in facilities. 4Boston volunteers do 
service in and around the city of 
Boston for four hours each and every 
week during the academic year. The 
aim of 4Boston is to provide stu- 
dents with a significant extended 
urban service experience, and to 
provide the agencies of Boston 
with reliable and consistent assis- 
tance from the BC community. 




Photos submitted by 4Boston 




"Action without reflection risks despair and 

reflection without action risks irrelevance." 

-part of 4Boston's M.ission Statement 




yVi 1 yV Jvol„nt^^>-^iT. i yV 











w^^^^^^^ 


Hi 



The Appalachia Volunteer 
Program is committed to 
working with the poverty- 
stricken populous of the US. The 
program's mission is to learn about 
the structural and societal realities 
of the US that leave some people 
impoverished, to discuss the injus- 
tices that create entrenched pov- 
erty, to consider a theological and 
faith perspective on social justice, 
and to participate in local service 
opportunities. Over Spring Break, 
the program sends over 500 BC 
students to travel to various sites 
throughout the Appalachia region. 



?1 


tr^^^J^^^ 




I'hoi.js si(())MittL'<i b\ Appalachia Volunteers 




The organization's main objective is to assist 
in the daily lives of those less fortunate than 
most. Appalachia Volunteers seek to huild a 
better future by entering into solidarity with 
the impoverished ot Buston and beyond. 




BEST BUDDIES 




t; 



'he mission of Best Buddies 
is to enhance the lives of 
people with intellectual 
disabilities by providing them 
with one-to-one friendships with 
Boston College students. The 
program began in 1987 at George- 
town University when Anthony K. 
Shriver, Founder and Chairman, 
realized that many people with 
intellectual disabilities lacked 
the opportunity to socialize with 
their iion-disabled peers. Col- 
lege Buddies (BC students) meet 
with their buddies at least twice a 
month, with activities ranging from 
having lunch to going to a movie. 




Last year's president, Damien LaRock, was awarded 
the Volvo Friendship tor Life Award. This was given 
to the best "buddy pair" in the country. The cash 
award of $ 1 0,000 was split between the buddy pair, 
the college chapter, and the Best BuddiesState Office. 





School Volunteers 



L 




The Campus School Volun- 
teers of Boston College is 
an organization of under- 
graduate students who work with 
and tor the students of the Campus 
School. Located in Campion, 
Campus School is an independent 
school that serves students from 
ages 3 to 21, who have multiple 
disabilities and special needs. Since 
1996, the Volunteers have been 
creating lasting relationships 
with the Campus School stu- 
dents. Throughout the academic 
year, four fundraising commit- 
tees organize events such as the 
sponsors for the Boston Marathon. 



Two years ago, the Campus School Volunteers 
raised $105,000 and presented the check to 
the school. Each year interest and participa- 
tion continue to grow. Together, the Volunteers 
are "Reaching Out to Make a Difference. 




Photos .submitted b7 Courtney Reynolds & Jim Conti 




Organi/arions 




t; 



'he Peer Education Network 
(PEN) of Boston College 
IS a select group of trained 
students committed to the better- 
ment of lives through knowledge 
and empowerment. Members are 
peer educators striving to achieve 
this goal through means of an active 
network of passionate individuals 
who work individually and as a team 
to positively impact the campus 
community, providing the resources 
and means to establish foundations 
for leading healthy life-styles. 




The goal of the Peer EducationNetwork is to increase 
knowledge and understanding of such complex 
issues as Alcohol and other Drugs, Sexual Assault, 
HlV/AlDS Awareness, Eating Disorders and Body 
Image, and their impact on the BC community. 




ENVIROblMENTAL 




t; 



'he mission of the Environ- 
mental Action Coalition 
(EAC) is to preserve and 
appreciate nature through mutu- 
ally encouraging components of ; 
environmental action and direct 
environmental experience. The 
EAC encourages the BC com- 
munity to appreciate nature with 
annual hikes, clean-ups, and 
recycled cereal box notebook , 
making. This year, members are | 
trying to educate themselves 
and the community more about 
environmental issues in the news, 
politics, and at Boston College. 




/'Iic.t./s sii/imittc'd /)\ E.AC 




"I'm so proud of how the EAC has grown since 
I first joined. We used to have one person at our 
meetings. Now we have committees, clean-ups, 
trips, fundraisers, and so much enthusiasm. I 
am amazed hy the amount of interest and dedi- 
cation." - Heather Laplantc, E.AC' President 



i\ 



Jamisi Calvin at White Mountains, NH 



From left: Marcu.s WoikIs, Heather 

Laplantc, Lauren DuRodner, James Calvin, 

Ryan Merrill 



i 



The Boston Intercollegiate Community Service Organization 



BICSO, the acronym for the Boston hiitercollegiate Community Service Organization, 
was established at Boston College by Jon Leiinon three years ago. BICSO works with 
other colleges in the city of Boston as an organization based on serving others as a vehicle 
of personal growth. BICSO conveys the idea of "service by choice," welcoming all members, 
however small or large their level of commitment. As a result, it provides an outlet for many 
students who cannot make a full-time commitment to other organizations. By working with 
other schools, BICSO has multiplied the size, scope, and impact of projects to a greater degree, as 
well as provided assistance in the research and development of projects for other organizations. 




The Women's Resource Center (WRC) offers a comfortable atmosphere in which to 
seek information, find peer support, participate in programs, and meet others. It is 
located in McElroy, and is open to all students, faculty, and staff. The mission of the 
Women's Resource Center is to celebrate the gifts and contributions women offer to the 
Boston College community. WRC also strives to serve the needs of women on campus and 
in the community through service and social justice activities. It is committed to the explo- 
ration of gender issues and to the equality of women and men in all sectors of society. The 
Women's Resource Center exists to support and encourage women in the full attainment of 
their personal, academic, professional, and spiritual goals through a wide variety of services 
to the studeiit body and the Boston College community. 



Photo by Andrew Logan 






The mission of Circle K at Boston College is to better the community and campus 
through service projects. Some projects that Circle K volunteers help out with on a 
weekly basis are located at places such as the Stone Institute and the AUston/Brighton 
Food Pantry. At the Stone Institute, the organization traditionally visits the McLellan 
Center, a rehabilitative iiursing facility for 82 short-term and long-term residents, where 
volunteers entertain residents with a game of Biiigo. At the Food Pantry, members join 
with Boston University students to serve meals to the local people. Boston College's chap- 
ter of Circle K makes the community at large accessible to students who can too often get 
wrapped up in events only on campus. Circle K introduces them to the world of service 
outside the campus walls, and facilitates their involvement in numerous service activities. 



Photos submitted by Circle K 



Organ i 7 



139 




Ecopledge is an environmental activism group that seeks corporate responsibility, demand- 
ing that big companies adjust their business practices to better protect the environment. 
Recent victories include Dell, Office Max, Staples, Office Depot, and Citigroup. Last 
year, Ecopledge was working on the Dell computer campaign, which strived to get the com- 
pany to take their computers back from customers once they became obsolete. After taking 
the computers back, Ecopledge demanded that the computers be recycled safely here in the 
United States rather than shipped to China, where they were deconstructed in unsafe and 
unhealthy conditions by underpaid workers. Another noteworthy event includes rallying 
in Boston asking Shaw's Supermarkets to remove genetically engineered ingredients from 
their store-brand products. The group on campus participates in days of action for campaigns 
by tabling in McElroy, education students on the issues and getting them to sign petitions. 




^ -kiglstfedatW^ L 



The Animal Rights Organization (ARO) was founded in 2001 by Kaitlin Amalthea 
(Class of 2003). The organization works to help expose the ways in which animals are 
mistreated and abused in our society, and to help inspire people to make compassionate 
choices in their everyday lives. In order to make people aware of the benefits of a vegetar- 
ian diet and to encourage them to be conscious consumers, the ARC has events including 
baking and giving away vegan food, video screenings of the award winning documentary 
The Witness, and Peaceable Kingdom, as well as having speakers come talk on a variety of 
topics like mad cow disease. The group tables in McElroy, and hands out information on 
vegetarianism, and also asks people to sign a pledge to give up meat for one day. Other activi- 
ties include volunteering at animal shelters in the area, attending conferences in Boston, 
having bands come play, and working on getting better veggie options in the dining halls. 



LEABsi>IING 



Learning to Serve is primarily a second semester service and mentoring program for fresh- 
men led by a council of upperclassmen. Small groups of freshmen, each led by one or two 
council members, spend four to five hours a week volunteering in the Boston community. 
Student involvement at placements ranges from tutoring at local schools to participating in 
organized activities at Boys and Girls Clubs or assisting in local homeless shelters. Bi-weekly, 
the small groups meet for reflection upon their service experiences, as well as to discuss Boston 
Collegefreshman issues in general. In the remaining weeks, the group meets as a whole to either 
take part in orientation or community-building activities or to hear from various speakers like 
BC Residential Life employees to community leaders and organizers. Learning to Serve is not 
only an exciting opportunity for freshmen to get acquainted with each other and the city of 
Boston, but it is also an introduction to what it really means to be "men and women tor others." 




AIVIE^RJCAN 



Red Cross 



The American Red Cross (ARC) of Boston College is a humanitarian organization, 
led by volunteers, that provides relief to victims of disasters, and helps people pre- 
vent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies. It does this through services that are 
consistent with its congressional charter and the principles of the International Red Cross 
Movement. In addition, the American Red Cross of Boston College will develop and offer 
services that address critical human, health and safety needs of the communities, which it 
serves, and are consistent with the National Mission of the American Red Cross. The Ameri- 
can Red Cross of Boston College has successfully carried out its goals by making itself the 
premier organization to sponsor blood drives on campus and to provide immediate disaster 
relief to the surrounding community alongside the Red Cross of Massachusetts Bay. It is also 
involved in CPR training, food distribution, community events and school supply collections. 



J — ;^gi^nTerglTicy%^diAi^ervices^^--^ 



Eagle Emergency Medical Services (EMS) was founded in 1 997 when Kevin Eidt collapsed 
in the Flynn Recreation Complex during a pickup basketball game. Friend and Emergency 
Medical Technician Mark Ritchie attempted to revive him while waiting for an ambu- 
lance to come and take him to a hospital, but was unable to and Eidt died within an hour of 
fainting. This motivated Ritchie to create Eagle EMS. The group is made up of trained student 
Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) , who assist the Boston College Police Department 
with medical emergencies. Today, students staff major events, such as Boston College football 
games and "Pops on the Heights." Eagle EMS also conducts CPR and Emergency Medical Tech- 
nician certification classes, and do daily night-time response on both Upper and Lower campus. 




PARTNERSHIP 



P: 



artnership for Life is a campus pro-life group that addresses all life issues, but focuses 
' mostly on the topics of abortion, euthanasia, and the death penalty. Members take 

part in weekly educational outreach, volunteer projects in Boston to aid mothers and 
children, and various walks and marches around the country, including the March for Life 
in Washington, D.C. in January of each year. Members also have the opportunity to meet 
with other college students at various conferences throughout the year. As an organiza- 
tion, Partnership for Life aims to bring Pro-Life students together, to facilitate dialogue 
among individuals with other student groups, and to provide education on life issues at 
Boston College by presenting various speakers and programs throughout the school year. 



-*- -*— ' *--of Friendship'^^ V i^ 



Festival of Friendship is an organization dedicated to establishing a strong relation- 
ship with the mentally handicapped community in Boston. The organization pro- 
vides a one day event held on campus for local special needs students. Over two 
hundred Boston College volunteers are involved in making this day possible. Boston 
College clubs and organizations staff carnival games and activities while entertainment 
is provided by various Boston College performance groups. Volunteers are buddies for 
the day to assist special needs guests in enjoying the festivities. Through fundraising and 
volunteer efforts, special needs guests are connected with the Boston College community. 



PROJECT 2000 



Project 2000 is a mentoring and tutoring program, which targets fourth and fifth graders 
from the John Marshall Elementary School in Dorcester, MA. The volunteers spend 
Saturdays helping these children. This Saturday program combines educational as well as 
recreational activities that help create positive role models for the young students. Activities 
that are organized and hosted by Project 2000 include Trick orTreating in the Mods, day trips to 
the Museum of Science, barbeques, and many other bonding activities. Common interactions 
between the volunteer mentors and the children include basketball, football, and arts and crafts. 



A 

Awar 



eness 




ee 



The AIDS Awareness Committee (AAC) is an organization of students involved in 
bringing education about HIV/AIDS to Boston College and the local community. 
From volunteering in Boston to sponsoring speakers on campus, the AAC is looking 
for individuals interested in helping others learn about the AIDS epidemic. The organization 
hopes to bring a better sense of reality to the campus of Boston College, and to also have a 
positive Impact upon the larger community. Members want to help in any way possible; no 
matter how small or large the contribution, the AIDS Awareness Committee feels doing 
something will help make a difference in the fight against AIDS. Some of the AIDS Aware- 
ness Committee's annual highlights include a benefit concert entitled Artists for AIDS, the 
5-K Run for Relief, additional other fundraising events, and bi-weekly general meetings, 
which host speakers and other educational opportunities for the Boston College community. 



Pholo.v submitted l)\ .A.A( 





BRAZJJJAN 



Club 



The Brazilian Club of Boston College seeks to bring great awareness of Brazilian culture 
to the Boston College campus. The organization is involved in a number of social and 
political activities through social events and academic lectures pertaining to Brazil and 
its Latin American neighbors. The Brazilian Club is very involved with other Portuguese- 
speaking groups on campus. It is a part of the Brazilian Associations of Boston, which strives 
to unite Brazilian students and those interested in the Brazilian culture with their counterparts 
at other universities in the Boston area. 



Photos submitted by Brazilian Club 





ttfdent Association 



The Cuban-American Student Association (CASA) serves the purpose of educating 
the Boston College community of Cuban culture through social, cultural, and political 
events. In fostering awareness of and preserving Cuban culture in the Boston Col- 
lege community through programming, the Cuban-American Student Association serves to 
unite the student body through cultural appreciation. By socially, culturally, and politically 
enhancing the community at Boston College through Cuban culture, the organization takes 
part in diversifying the Boston College campus. 



Photos submitted by CASA 







of Native American Peoples 



The Society of Native American Peoples (SNAP) represents all Native American Boston 
College students, including all descendants of Native Americans from the contiguous United 
States and its territories, Canada, Native Hawaiians, Native Alaskans, and people indigenous 
to Latin America. The organization welcomes all BC students who wish to learn about and 
participate in Native American history, culture and current issues, and to be active members. 
SNAP is dedicated to to providing a helping harid to fellow Native Americans through service 
projects in communities outside of BC, in particular to Indian reservations in predominantly 
Native American regions. In addition, SNAP pledges to assist in creating a more diverse BC 
community by reaching out to prospective Native American students as well as fostering the 
success of those on campus. For the 2004-2005 academic year, the organization's most impor- 
tant goal is to increase awareness of Native American culture and the issues that surround 
its preservation, both within its members and in the BC community. SNAP acts as both the 
political and cultural voice of the Native American community at Boston College. 



Photos submitted by Melissa Hargleroad 



Organizatinns ^43 



A31AN 



As representatives oi the Asian American community here at Boston College, the 
Asian Caucus (AC) strives to foster relationships between its members and the 
greater Boston College and Boston communities. Through a balanced social, educa- 
tional and political agenda, the organization is committed to creating a unified voice that is 
necessary in order to create awareness of issues that affect the Asian American community 
and contribute to the progress and betterment of society. The Asian Caucus is committed to 
the seven culture clubs that it comprises, recognizing that part of AC's task is to serve the 
culture clubs by supporting their efforts and serving as a resource. Through its efforts, the AC 
hopes to be truly representative of the community that it represents. Recognizing the common 
struggles that are shared with members of the AHANA community, the AC hopes to work 
with other AHANA organizations in the efforts taking place to create a better environment 
at BC. The Asian Caucus commits to reaching out to the diverse audience that makes up 
Boston College, hoping to promote dialogue and foster relationships through various events. 



Photos submitted by Jina Moon 





GEI^MAN 



' he German Academy is the organization on campus that promotes the German language 
and culture in the university community, and fosters friendships between German and 
American students. The group has Stammtisch (regular table) every Wednesday at Rog- 
gie's Every week German-speaking foreign exchange students, Boston College students studying 
German, and anyone else who speaks German meet for dinner. Stammtisch provides an informal 
atmosphere in which everyone can practice German. The club also promotes German cultural 
events. The German Academy also organizes social functions including a Christmas party. 



Tl 



PKoto submitted by Agnes Farkas 



puert:q,rican 



The Puerto Rican Association of Boston College wants to communicate to the stu- 
dent body the influence and importance of the Puerto Rican community by creat- 
ing a liaison between island and mainland Puerto Ricans, by maximizing intercol- 
legiate relations, and by breaking down stereotypes. The PRAholds forums and seminars 
to show a full image of Puerto Rican culture, and helps the local Puerto Rican community 
with aide and community service. The Puerto Rican Association of Boston college wants 
to educate and create a better understanding of what it means to be a Puerto Rican. 



Photo Mtbniitti'd by Natalia Martinci 




H.^^^^;)C^II CLUB 



Tl 




'he Hawaii Club was formerly known as "Ka Hui Ana O Napu'uwai," which means "The 
Gathering of Hearts" when translated from Hawaiian. The club was founded in 1 994 in 
an effort to unite the Hawaiian population in the student body. The Hawaii Club strives 
to promote Hawaii's spirit of Aloha and appreciation for nature within the club and the Boston 
College community. The club members wish to create and fortify a substantial cultural link 
between people from Hawaii, as well as to provide a "support group" for students from Hawaii 
who are experiencing transitional difficulties being so far away from the Hawaiian Islands. The 
club sponsors such events as the Fall Hawaiian Dinner, University of Hawaii football game 
parties, and the annual Hawaii Club of Boston College Luau, which is their culture show. 



Photos submitted by Peter Lee 



Black-St udent For u m 



The Black Student Forum's mission is to provide an innovative platform that 
encourages political, intellectual, and social growth of the student body, and 
in doing so, to allow the Boston College community to experience the sum 
of the many elements that combine to make the black experience. The BSF spon- 
sors such forums as The Black Male and His Sexuality, as well as the Freshmen Men- 
toring Program and the Joe Clark keynote address during Black History Month. 



The National Association ibp4 




(Jftt of Colored People 



The Boston College chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored 
People began in 1979 as astudent-led vehicle for advocating the civil rights of African 
American people. The mission of the Boston College chapter is to uplift the minority 
community of all people as well as support the goals and ideals of the national body of the 
NAACP. They have pledged to uphold the innate civil rights that all people possess and to 
abhor, abstain from, and fight against injustice of any kind on Boston College's campus or in the 
community. Membership is open to all members of the undergraduate and graduate population of 
Boston College. NAACP's large events include the DEF Poetry Jam, poetry cafe, speaker series, 
and an award celebration for a dedicated faculty or staff member of the AHAN A community. 



CARIBBEAN 



The Caribbean Culture Club was founded in October 1988 by Lisa Morgan of Jamaica. 
The drive behind such a big move was made in hopes that the Caribbean Culture Club 
would become the forum for members to express the common bond that they all share. 
While building a home of unity, the organization hopes to be successful in providing a familiar 
atmosphere for all members. It strives to foster an understanding of the diverse cultures of the 
Caribbean. In an effort to accomplish these goals, the club is structured to educate members 
and others concerning the social, economical, and political problems of the Caribbean. The 
leaders believe that being involved in social outreach programs helps them relate to minority 
Caribbean groups living in Boston. Another goal of this group is to remove the stereotypes 
and labels that others may have of the people that share their culture. Parallel to this, they 
desire to be the medium whereby the concepts of different cultures might be exchanged. 




JAPAN CLUB 



The Japan Club of Boston College has achieved greater presence in Asian Caucus and 
the Boston College community through strong core leadership. By electing represen- 
tatives from the Japan Club to attend main meetings of other clubs, the organization 
builds better awareness and increases visibility, which contributes to the success of upcoming 
events. Members of the Japan Club of Boston College are invited to join frequent events, 
gatherings, and discussions to foster the Japanese culture. By building strong friendships within 
the Japan Club community, the club hopes to advance the friendship to interact with other 
cultural clubs and their events on and off campus, including the Japan Society of Boston. 







Photos submitted by Melissa Nonaica 



^ ^^^^r^f ms^^cMt^ ^^~^ 



The purpose of the Irish Society of Boston College is to preserve, promote, enjoy, and 
actively participate in the traditions, heritage, and cultural activities of Irish Ances- 
try on the Boston College campus. The intent of the organization is to encourage 
the celebration of these traditions with the surrounding community of Boston College and 
Boston as a whole by participation in and patronizing local events. Furthermore, the Irish 
ScKiety of Boston College hopes to enlighten those in the community who are not familiar 
with the rich Irish heritage and to promote group unity through a series of organized events. 



Photo by Andrew Logan 




S O LJ 4dettss.^ioSI ^A. N 



T 



he St)uth Asian Students Association (SASA) founded in 1996 and previously known 
as the Indian Students Association, is a student-led organization that represents the 
countries of Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. The purpose of the 
organization is to provide Boston College students and faculty who are of South Asian 
descent, or those interested in South Asia, with an environment where they can meet, learn, 
and participate in cultural events with others of the same interest. The South Asian Students 
Association is open to all, and strives for true cultural unity by celebrating differences in a 
fun and exciting atmosphere. Their biggest event of the year is the annual cultural show, 
consisting of many different dances ranging from traditional folk dance to class bhangra, 
a fashion show, singing, as well as performances from other cultural groups and schools. 



ARN4E,NIAN 



The Armenian Club was created in an effort to promote awareness for the Armenian 
culture, and to bring together the Armenian community of Boston College. They focus 
specifically on appreciating the language, music, food, and customs. One of the important 
social issues that they strive to promote understanding about is the Armenian Genocide. The 
organization is active in many of the Boston College multicultural events such as lectures and 
cultural cafes in McElroy. The club also has several independent activities including group 
dinners at Armenian restaurants, dances, and meetings with other Armenian clubs in the 
area. The Armenian Club serves as a source of community for those who enjoy their heritage. 



Photos submitted by Armenian Chi 





^ Studkt&clMioil^^J^-^^^- 



The Cape Verdean Student Association (CVSA) aims to promote and preserve the 
Cape Verdean culture and heritage here at Boston College through educational 
fundamentals, such as discussion panels and lectures, and through social proceed- 
ings, such as cultural events and festivities. In order to develop awareness within Boston's 
Cape Verdean community, the organization annually hosts a program called Prospective 
Weekend. This program is directed to high school students in the Boston area who are 
interested in attending college after graduation, mainly Boston College. The emphasis of 
the program is to convince Cape Verdean students of the importance of going to college. 
Although the Cape Verdean Student Association sees it necessary to reach out to the 
Boston community, the group also focuses its attention to giving service to their native 
country. Thus, the Cape Verdean Student Association organizes a service trip to Cape Verde. 
There, members work with the community to assist in the development of their facilities. 



PRG AM1.ZAT ION 

The Organization of Latin American Affairs, referred to as OLAA. , is a cultural organiza- 
tion of Boston College. Its purpose is to articulate and promote the needs and goals of 
the Latinos at Boston College and to foster and encourage an attitude of academics, 
religious beliefs, and social awareness. The Organization of Latin American Affairs aids, supports, 
and assists in the recruitment of prospective Latino/a students, and assists in their admission to 
Boston College (Student Admission Program). The group raises awareness regarding the state 
of Latin America, and incorporates the use of bilingual and bi-cultural knowledge in providing 
exposure of the college experience to Latino communities through community service, political 
action, social justice, and social awareness. OLAA strives to unify Latino students, not only 
in the Boston College community, but also in other academic institutions. Throughout the 
year, this organization sponsors many events including a Latino fashion show, the Hermandad 
Retreat, programs about Latinos in the United States and in Latin America, forums on issues 
pertinent to the Latino community, and participation in protesting the School of the Americas. 



Photos submitted by OLA.A 





<» ^H 





The Chinese Students Association (CSA) exists to provide greater awareness and 
understanding of the Chinese and Chinese-American culture. Any aspect of the 
culture is strongly emphasized to promote a more diverse world here at Boston 
College. Issues regarding the political and economic welfare should also be addressed. 
The club shall plan to educate such issues to mainly the student body of Boston College, 
via telephone and email notifications, flyers, meetings, and other similar promotions. 
Events are aimed to educate and foster community development, and showcase Chinese 
food, art, and history. Such events include Hot Pot Night, Dim Sum Outings, movie 
showings, educational speakers, and a culture show. The CSA hopes to maintain and 
express the distinctive beauty of the Chinese culture to the students of Boston College. 



Photos submitted (ry CSA 



HELLENIC 



A^ one of the more notable ethnic clubs on campus, the Hellenic Society of Boston 
College celebrates Greek heritage and culture. With a little over twenty members, 
the group organizes and participates in activites that promote their Grecian roots. 
The clubs hosts Greek night at McElroy, which features a selection of Greek favorites to 
diversify the dining experience of Boston College students. In the past, the Hellenic Society 
has participated in the independent state parade, walking all over downtown Boston and 
wielding the national flag of Greece. More regular activities that are enjoyed by the club's 
members are dinners at Dionysis Restaurant and clubbing at Venu. Most of the Hellenic 
Society's members have some degree of Greek ancestry. They find that the club's community 
permits them to promote and participate in activities that express their cultural heritage. 



Plwias suhmittcd by Krist\ LMUtbi 





^^^^tidenls Assoeration ^ ^ 

The objective of the Boston College Korean Students Association (KSA) is to cultivate 
and promote an interest in Korean and Korean-American history, culture, and many 
other facets of the Korean and Korean- American experience by providing opportunities 
for Boston College students to come together on a political, cultural, and social level. KSA 
serves as an active academic support network for Koreans and Korean-Americans through 
events fostering community development and stimulating personal development in defining 
one's identity. The Korean Students Association thereby embraces the responsibility to edu- 
cate Boston College as a whole, as well as the surrounding community, in accordance to its 
objectives. Through these guidelines, Boston College's KSA will respectfully represent and 
share the Korean heritage. With a special focus on embracing the Korean- American culture, 
increasing diversity, and raising cultural awareness on campus, KSA also encourages discussion 
and consciousness about issues that confront today's Korean- Americans. KSA hopes to promote 
interest in all aspects of the Korean and Korean- American experience through various programs. 



Photo.s submitted by KSA 



IL CIRCOLO 



T 



he purpose of II Circolo Italiano is to spread the Italian culture to Boston College students 
through language, movies, food, soccer, bocci, and experiences. The organization often 
has dinners at Lucia's in the North End, and holds a bocci tournament in the Dustbowl. 



Photo submitted b-v Sarah Baldwin 






^T^^N 



-^tutJent Orgam^ 



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'he African Student Organization of Boston College is a premiere cultural group that 
strives to introduce the diversity of Africa's culture, traditions, customs, and politics 
to the Boston College community. The organization is not exclusive or limited to 
student of African descent, and welcome all who have an interest in promoting the diver- 
sity of Africa's richness. The African Student Organization is committed to the recruit- 
ment of potential African students to the Boston College campus, and provides support 
for students of African descent in the form of mentoring with academic and social issues. 



Photo submitted b-y Chikaelo Ibeabuchi 



11 ASSOCIATION 



The mission of L' Association Haitienne at Boston College is to increase knowledge of the 
unique history of Haiti and its people, to promote discussion on contemporary, political, 
and social issues, and to foster a better understanding of Haitian culture. The club is in its 
seventh year at Boston College, and aims to create an inclusive, rather than elusive, atmosphere, 
attracting members from all backgrounds. L'Association Haitienne strives to continue to edu- 
cate the community on Haitian culture through a series of both educational and social events 
promoting unity. Some of these eveiits include weekly Creole classes, Haitian featured movie 
nights, organized guest lectures focusing on Haiti's history and culture, co-sponsored events, 
forums, its annual spring cultural/fashion show, and an annual Haitian Student Conference. 



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Photos submitted by L'Association Haitienne 





V I EXN AiM E SE 



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'he Vietnamese Students Association (VSA) endeavors to promote the understand- 
ing, appreciation, and awareness of its Vietnamese and Vietnamese-American 
heritage and culture. In doing so, the organization cultivates an atmosphere of 
intellectual responsibility as well as an ongoing civility upon which our community strives 
for. This cultivation can be encountered at core events like cultural shows, game nights, 
charity fundraisings, language classes, and Vietnamese cuisine nights. Through these close 
interactions and a continuing active involvement within the community VSA's voice, 
and its presence will have assisted in forming a much stronger and unified community. 



Photos submitted by Annie he 



INDQLIESIAN 



The Indonesian Culture Club began as an organization that would allow Boston College 
students to gather weekly for the purpose of exchanging ideas and thoughts about the 
growing concern on Indonesia's economy, politics, and social life. Furthermore, the 
members of this cultural club sought to promote their diverse cultures by organizing events and 
activities that would welcome anyone interested to join in celebrating their heritage. The more 
notable activities that this organization is responsible for planning and hosting are the Indonesian 
Night and the Christian Celebration at St. Ignatius. The Indonesian N ight takes place once a year 
and unites all the other Indonesian clubs from other schools in Boston and the surrounding areas. 



J ^A. K^^A^„IC/V 



Founded in 2000, the Jamaica Association of Boston College aims to educate the Boston 
College community about the Jamaican culture, history, economics, and people. This 
goal is accomplished through lectures, culture shows, dinners, and performances by the 
Dance Troop. The Jamaican Association Dance Troop was founded in 2003 by Sannisha Dale. 




tair College 



The Philippine Society of Boston College (PSBC) is an organization that cel- 
ebrates the beauty and richness of the Filipino culture. It fosters community spirit 
through the meetings as well as the special events it hosts. As a club, the Philip- 
pine Society of Boston College adheres to three main objectives including strengthening 
the bonds of its members. Secondly, the PSBC strives to develop an understanding of 
and appreciation for Filipino and Filipino-American culture. Lastly, the organization 
works to network with other Filipino organizations in the greater Boston area. PSBC is 
family. It is culture. It is unity. PSBC welcomes everyone and thrives off its diversity. 



Photos submitted by Romeo Ymalay 





l%ran Stud 



;mea 



As a student organization, the Southeast Asian Students Association (SEASA) strives 
to educate, promote, and uphold the beautiful traditions of the Southeast Asian cul- 
tures through various campus activities. SEASA's objectives on campus are to support 
fellow Southeast Asian students and to provide a voice for themselves in student government. 
Along with other Asian student organizations, the Southeast Asian Students Association 
brings diversity and creates a sense of community. However, it is in its own community 
that members hope to make the biggest difference by installing pride and confidence in the 
younger generation to pursue higher education with its annual Prospective Weekend program. 




isei 



libit 



The Boston College Dance Ensemble consists of 36 students joined together by a pas- 
sion for dance. Most have received intense dance training for years and welcome the 
opportunity to continue developing their love for their art here at BC. Members of 
this completely student-run organization train together all year, taking ballet and jazz classes 
taught by renowned professional dancers and teachers in the Boston area. They spend count- 
less hours choreographing and rehearsing for performances at the end of each semester. These 
performances consist of about twenty dances, ranging in style from ballet, hip-hop, jazz, tap, and 
musical theater. Each is choreographed, costumed, staged, and danced by Ensemble members. 
All proceeds from the performances, which total upwards of $15, 000 over the course of one 
year, directly benefit the Boston College Campus School. Specifically, performance sales help 
to enhance the music therapy resources and programming at the Campus School. In addition to 
the show, the Ensemble also performs in various events both on and off campus, such as Artists 
for AIDS, the Second Chances Benefit, the Dance Marathon, Festival of Friendship, and more. 



Photos submitted by Liz Stowe 






o 



izaTioi 



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'he goal of the Boston College Dance Organization is to promote dances of all 
t ypes to the Boston College student community. In addition to this, Dance 
Organization provides students with the opportunity to choreograph and experi- 
ment with the art of dance. It allows more advanced students to utilize and expand their 
talents while providing beginners an open and fun environment to learn about dance. 
The dancers work hard to dance with a freedom that comes from the love of the art. 



Photos submitted by Dance Organization 



Females Inc 



OT|5t)rafiYTg'^Sfetwtihcra 



Through Step 



Females Incorportaing Sisterhood Through Step (F.I.S.T.S.), Boston College's 
official female step team, is designed to build strong, talented, and focused 
young women as well as excellent steppers. The number one goal of the group 
is to construct a sound sense of sisterhood amongst members through the activity 
of step, so that as a team, they will be able to positively impact the community. 



Pholoi iubmiiicd hy F.IS.T. 








Photos submitted by Competition Dance Team 



^^-^ ^^-^^ V X J. Dance Team 



The Competition Dance Team is a relatively new organization here at Boston 
College. The 2004-2005 year is only their third season in existence. Even though 
two years ago was their novice year, they were selected to represent Boston 
College at The National Dance Competition in Florida. The Competition Dance 
Team is well on their way to making it again this year. They can also be seen perform- 
ing their hip-hop, pom, and jazz style dances at other events, such as select basketball 
games and dance events at neighboring universities. The Competition Dance Team 
aims at performing and competing artistically with high-precision and high-energy. 



SWING KIDS 



In the 1920s, Harlem's Savoy Ballroom gave birth to a new style ot dance: The 
Lindy Hop and Swing Dancing. Its wild and sexual movements challenged 
authority, and its free spirit defied racial boundaries. Sadly, the times would 
move past swing dancing. However, the 90's embraced it with a newfound appre- 
ciation, and sparked a movement that will keep us swinging well throughout this 
century and into the next. BC Swing Kids was started five years ago by a group ot 
then-sophomores in a successful effort to reignite the interest of swing dancing in 
the Boston College community. The organization offers weekly lessons to all levels 
of experience, and organizes frequent events with other colleges. Above all, Swing 
Kids aim to have fun, interact with new people, and keep the spirit ot swing alive. 



Phnin^ ^Khmiitcd h\ fiLi/iiiin Tim 






Band Dance^Te 



The Marching Band Dance Team performs as part of the Screaming Eagles 
Marching Band. They provide an entertaining and artistic visual ele- 
ment to the half-time show that enhances the music and pictures per- 
tormed by the Marching Band. The Marching Band Dance Team also helps 
to get the crowd pumped during games by leading dances and cheers to the 
band stand shorts. The diverse mix of lyrical, jazz, and pom dance they perform 
helps to enhance the experience the Marching Band gives to the Superfans. 



'/lotos by Heather Page 



Organizations 153 



-t~l ^ 4ulmrfClJb 




The Hip-Hop Culture Club of Boston College was founded to help promote and spread 
the message of hip-hop through the student body community. As a largely misunderstood 
media of music, the group seeks to educate others about the history and actual culture 
that exists beneath the surface. Frequent meetings with dance help to bring further life 
to the group and the club can sometimes be seen performing in events around campus. 



1 






BOSTON I ANS 

1 bounded in 1986, the Bostonians is Boston College's oldest a cappella group. The 
: HH group is co-ed, using female and male soloists alike to supply a colorful show 
! JL for all to enjoy. From slow to upbeat, pop to classics, the Bostonians not only 
j demonstrate talent, but musical diversity in all their performances. In the past, the 
Bostonians have toured several states in the U.S. They plan to continue their travel- 
ing tradition this spring as well as return to their old pastime: national competitions. 
With fourteen members ranging from freshmen to seniors, the Bostonians will be 
putting out a new CD this spring with which they hope to be selected for the Best 
of College A Cappella, an honor they have been awarded for the past two CD's they 






P/i(j[ii submaicd by The Bostonians 


have produced. When in attendance of any of their numerous campus performances, 
it is easy to see that this is simply a group of talented singers who like to have fun 
and make music. 







OYNAIVIIGS 



The Boston College Dynamics is the youngest of the co-ed a cappella groups 
on campus, but also one of the most active. Founded in the fall of 1998, the 
group has steadily been gaining fans and recognition as a household Boston 
College name. Consisting of about sixteen undergraduate students, the group maintains 
a varied repertoire ranging anywhere from Motown to 80's hits to popular music of 
today. Each year, the Dynamics perform at different events both on and oft campus, 
and hold three shows of their own. They aim to please an audience with enjoyable 
music in a way that is exciting to watch through hard work, friendship, and lots of 
fun. They have been known to sing all over campus in cafe's, benefit concerts, and 
invitationals, as well as up and down the East Coast touring at other schools and 
venues. 



Photos submiued by T/ie Dynamics 






t; 



'he Sharps were founded in 1990 as the only all-female a cappella group on 
campus. Since those humble beginnings, the Sharps has grown into a polished 
fifteen-member group that transcends the traditional notion of girl groups. 
Built upon sisterly values, the group's goal is to share their joy with others by using 
their own voices to re-create songs everyone loves to hear. The Sharps have toured 
at colleges and universities up and down the East Coast, arid performed at many 
corporate and private functions as well as campus events. 



P/iotos submitted by The S/iarfis 



AG4ai>ISX 



Against the Current is a non-denominational Christian a cappella group that 
ministers to the campus community through their music and testimonies. 
The performers assembled in the Spring of 1998 with the intention of start- 
ing a group that would worship God through a cappella music. The auditions that 
followed that year brought ten enthusiastic freshmen, who helped to form the group 
for the purpose of bringing the Gospel through a cappella music to the Boston College 
community. Against the Current has grown to be a music ministry including members 
from each class, race, and denomination of the Boston College student population. 
The musical group aspires to serve God on the campus of BC in conjunction with 
the campus fellowships, churches, and other organizations. 



Photon submitted b-i Ajnni^t the Current 





o\ 



S: 



ince 1993, the Acoustics have performed their way into many hearts with 
an uplifting, humorous, and theatrical brand of a cappella. In its twelfth year 
at Boston College, the group has developed a rich history of traditions and a 
devoted alumni of over sixty members. The Acoustics have released a total of five 
albums. Outside the studio, the Acoustics venture off on wild tours, and compete in 
the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella. They have taken their 
high-energy performances everywhere from the Nation's capital to the sunny beaches 
of Florida, and received numerous accolades (Regional Champions, Best Arrange- 
ments, Best Soloists). On campus, the Acoustics harmonize at many venues, including 
numerous benefits and charity concerts. At their famous Cafe performances, their 
wacky skits have confronted bizarre topics including infectious Disney medleys, game 
show violence, alien abduction, talk show trash, yellow journalism, underwear par- 
ties, and PBS telethons. 



Photos submitted by The Acoustics 



Organizafinn.s 



HEIGHTSIvlEN 



The Heightsmen of Boston College is Boston College's only all-male a cappella 
group dedicated to musical excellence. Celebrating their fifteenth year in 2005 , 
the group has established itself as a prominent musical group on and off the 
Boston College campus. Last February, they released their seventh album, "False." While 
maintaining a diverse musical repertoire that encompasses everything from 50's do-wops 
tocontemporary hits, the Heightsmen entertain thousands of acappella fans worldwide. 



Photos b;y Mike Stefanilo and Myra Chai 






T 



'he Voices of Imani was organized in the fall of 1978. Created to celebrate the 
viability, potency, and beauty of gospel music, the choir has served both as a 
source of spiritual inspiration and a needed source amongst students of color. 
"Imani," Swahili for "faith," is indicative of what the choir strives to reflect through 
its music. The goal of Voices of Imani is to explore and share the full wealth of black 
musical culture as members sing, professing their faith through contemporary gospel 
music, as well as traditional Negro spirituals. Their mission is to sing praises unto God 
and minister to the community using the gifts that God blessed them with. In years 
past, Voices of Imani has successfully completed tours throughout the United States. 



UNIVERSITY 



Starting out as a small, all-male glee club in 1912, the University Chorale 
is now co-ed and the largest arts organization at Boston College. Entirely 
student-run, the Chorale currently has 160 singers, including students, 
Jesuits, and faculty members. The University Chorale displays its talents at 
numerous events both on and off campus. In the past, the group has traveled 
to Rome to sing at St. Peter's Basilica. Domestically, they have traveled to 
New York City to perform a benefit concert for the Twin Towers Orphan Fund. 



Photos submiiied (r» UniversUy Choral 





MARCJHING 



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hether it's on the turfofAlumni Stadium during half-time of a football game, 
or on the streets of New England for a parade, or in front of hundreds of high 
school students at an exhibition, wherever the Screaming Eagles Marching 
Band performs, you can feel the excitement in the air. This collection of highly spirited, 
talented, and committed individuals have provided thrills and excitement to audiences 
from across the nation - and even as far away as Ireland. Founded in 1 9 1 9, the Screaming 
Eagles Marching Band has become the embodiment of New England Division I athletics 
through excellence in performance both on and off the field. Currently, the Screaming 
Eagles provide opportunities for instrumentalists, color guard, dancers, and managers. 



Photos submitted by Marching Band 




Be bOp! is a ZS-piece jazz ensemble dedicated to the highest levels of instrumental 
and vocal jazz performance. The standard for musicianship is high, the repertoire 
is challenging, and the work ethic is rigorous. The group is now over fifteen 
years old, and has frequently performed in both national and international arenas. The 
group's performances have included Carnegie Hall in New York City, the Walt Disney 
World Resort in Orlando, Florida, and the Jamaica Grande resort in OchoRios, Jamaica. 
BC bOp! provides Boston College students with numerous performances on campus, 
including their concerts at the Breaking the Barriers Ball, and the AIDS Benefit Ball. 



Photos submitted by BC fcO/i' 




SYMPJ^ONY 



The Boston College Symphony Orchestra (BCSO) is comprised of approximately fifty 
undergraduate and graduate students dedicated to playing music of the symphonic 
repertoire. This group of musicians graces the campus with four concerts each year, 
including the annual Christmas Concert with the Boston College Chorale. Led by the 
esteemed John Finney, the BCSO has nearly doubled in size in the last six years, and has 
become one of the most talked about, up and coming artistic ensembles on the Heights. 



Organiyarinns 157 





The Brass Choir is like a chamber ensemble on steroids. The year before David 
Healey accepted the conducting position for the group, the Brass Choir had 
approximately a dozen members. In 2000, the group grew to thirty mem- 
bers. In 2001, Brass Choir had forty-five members, and in 2002, the group grew 
to a membership of sixty. As of right now, there is no membership roster for last 
year and this year, but the group anticipates that the number will again be high. 





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IvlUSIC GUILD 



The Music Guild provides a forum for musicians of all levels and styles to in- 
teract and perform on campus. Currently, the Guild consists of over two hun- 
dred members. Their website serves as a tool for musicians by allowing them 
to search a member directory, post messages, upload original mp3's, reserve practice 
space, and keep informed on possible performance opportunities. The Music Guild 
provides an opportunity for students who are interested in music both recreational 
and professionally. In practice, the Guild sponsors various types of events each year 
at Boston College, including open mic nights, drum circles, guest lectures. Battle of 
the Bands, and concerts featuring well-known regional acts of various genres. The 
Music Guild dates back before Boston College had an actual music program, and 
today has evolved into a unique organization not to be found at other university. 



Photos submitted fc^y tAxmc Guild 




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The Boston College Concert Band boasts a diverse membership, with a portion of 
the band comprised of BC alumni, staff, and graduate students, mixing among 
undergraduate students. This diversity contributes to an atmosphere of growth as 
developing musicians mix with experienced players. The Concert Band performs a wide 
variety of both traditional and contemporary literature for wind band. The mission of the 
Boston College Concert Band is to provide students, faculty, staff, and community mem- 
bers who share a passion for making music an opportunity to perform wind and percussion 
music of outstanding composers in an educational setting. In the past, the Concert Band 
has performed a dynamic and varied concert schedule including holiday concerts. Pops 
dinner concerts, and seasonal concerts. The group has also performed a series of exchange 
concerts with other Jesuit universities, including Georgetown University, John Carroll 
University in Cleveland, Ohio, and Tufts University. The Concert Band continues to 
seek new and different opportunities that will enhance the experiences of its members. 




PEP BAND 



The Boston College Pep Band is an acoustic musical ensemble composed of 
wind instruments, drum set, and auxiliary percussion. Under the direction 
of one professional director and student conductors/coordinators, the Bos- 
ton College Pep Band is one of the most highly visible of the Boston College Band 
Program Ensembles. With a membership of approximately fifty to sixty students per 
year, the band is split into Maroon and Gold ensembles to provide a well-balanced 
bond at all athletic events. The Pep Band supports the Men's Hockey Team and 
both Women and Men's Basketball Teams, creating an ample opportunity for the BC 
Pep Band member to support Boston College Athletics, travel to fun and exciting 
athletic events, as well as to get air-time on regional and national sports broadcasts. 



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According to group legend. My Mother's Fleabag was founded in 1980, 
which makes them the oldest college improv troupe in the country. 
The group consists entirely of Boston College students, yet has in ac- 
tuality no connection to the school. My Mother's Fleabag performs in and 
around Boston, in whole or in part, for fun or as a booked contract. The com- 
edy organization performs the standard array of improv games, completely un- 
scripted, based on live audience suggestions. Each semester, the group does a 
four-show, two-day run, mixing improv, skits, a group opera, and a live band. 



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The Dramatics Society of Boston College, founded in 1865, is the oldest 
student group on campus. The Dramatics Society provides student actors, 
designers, directors, playwrights, and producers another outlet to voice 
their creativity and to share their talent with the Boston College community. By 
choosing works from a well-established canon of dramatic literature to student-writ- 
ten works, the group strives to make the arts an important part of university life. 



f'hotos siibmiiteti b^i Dramatics 'i,odeVj 



Organ i7 



159 



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The Committee for Creative Enactments (CCE) is a comedic theater troupe dat- 
ing hack to the mid SO's that layers improvised scenes on top of a scripted plot in 
a murder-mystery format. Made up entirely of BC students, there is no conven- 
tional stage, and the performance is not to be passively watched. Actors move throughout 
the audience, and converse with audience members directly. Audience members take on 
the pretense of the setting of the show and O'Connell House (an old mansion and BC 
landmark) is transformed into a medieval castle, or the estate of William Shakespeare, 
or a Victorian era hotel, or e\'en (as a real stretch) a spooky old mansion. Audience 
members are guests of the event, and there may be multiple scenes occurring simultane- 
ously in several rooms in O'Connell House. Audience members may follow their favorite 
characters into a scene or engage them in conversation, or even interrogate a suspect 
themselves. All actors remain in character throughout the night, making for an unfor- 
gettable evening that can't be compared to any other form of entertainment out there. 



Photos submitted hy CCE 





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Hello. ..Shovelhead! is a sketch comedy group comprised of students with a 
talent tor humor. Hello. ..Shovelhead's goal is to entertain the Boston Col- 
lege community with sketch comedy. The club members meet on a weekly 
basis where they put together their creative ideas and write and act out original 
work. They end up with roughly forty scenes after each meeting. Of all the scenes 
they comprise in their practices, the group chooses nine to act out for any given 
performance. Hello... Shovelhead! puts together a genre of comedy that is similar 
to the sketches on Saturday Night Live and Mad TV. With their innovative skits, 
they have managed to make Boston College students laugh for over a decade. 



Photos suhmittei by Hello .. ShoveWteai'. 




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The Role Players and Strategy Enthusiasts (RPSE) is an organization founded 
less than a decade ago by a small group of individuals who were interested in 
role-playing, board, and strategy games. The club's purpose is to locate indi- 
viduals of Boston College with an interest in engaging in role-playing and strategy 
games, to introduce them to each other, and to create an environment in which those 
individuals can find enjoyment and the opportunity for artistic expression through 
those games. In addition, the club maintains organization between the games so 
that new members can be referred to games matching their areas of interest, as well 
as for the games to be continued from year to year. Currently, the club possesses a 
large library of challenging and eclectic games for members to borrow and enjoy. 



Phinm suhmitled hy Rnlc Players and Strate/^ Eni/iusrasl 





ASININE 

Asinine is one of the few comedy groups around that incorporates both 
sketch and improvisational comedy into their shows. Members write, 
direct, and act in their own original sketches and video segments as well 
as perform an increasing repertoire of improv games. Asinine's purpose at Boston 
College is first and foremost to entertain, but also to get more people involved 
in the production of the performing arts of improvisational and sketch comedy. 
The group prides itself on the fact that it is Boston College's only sketch AND 
improv group; there are also very few other groups beyond BC who work with 
both art forms simultaneously. They offer frequent and affordable shows to their 
fans, performing for $3 every month or so. The Asinine website receives hundreds 
of hits each month by loyal fans. Founded in 2001 by a rag-tag group of students. 
Asinine has risen from performing in the Eagle's Nest with about twenty people 
in the audience to performing monthly shows that sell out hundreds of seats. 



Photos submitted by Asinine 



CONXEKljeORARY 



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ontemporary Theater is a dramatic club on campus in addition to the Dramatics 
Society. Performingproductionswrittenbyplaywrightswithin the lasttwodecades, 
they represent the trends in present-day theater and put a modem spin on things. 



Photos submitted by Contemporary Theater 





LITUBOICAL 



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'he Liturgical Arts Group (LAG) serves the community of Boston College by 
sharing their special gift of music at the regular weekend liturgies of the campus 
and at various events at Boston College. With song and instrument and dance, 
the LAG provides a wide repertoire of music to enliven and enrich the experience of 
worship. As pilgrims on a journey, the students in the Liturgical Arts Group envision 
facilitating liturgical participation as a privelege. Through praise of God in song, the 
community at prayer finds its way to greater depth and joy in its service to others. 
LAG meets regularly for rehearsal and prayer, and especially tries to foster community 
among freshman members. LAG has released CDs in the past and its group number 
goes up considerably each year. The group's contributions make masses feel much 
warmer and bring the students closer together through the sharing of their gifts. 



Photos sufcmitted by Liturgical Arts Group 



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Asian Christian Fellowship (ACF) has large group meetings weekly that 
include singing praise songs, a talk by a guest speaker, and fellowship with 
food at the end. Occasionally, ACF has a special event instead of regular 
meetings. Each member is also encouraged to join one of the small groups that meet 
during the week. These small groups range from doing a book-study to ha ving free 
discussion and prayer. Asian Christian Fellowship has a general prayer meeting 
one e a week for anybody who needs prayer, or wants to pray for the fellowship, 
the campus, the world, or anything else. ACF has one retreat each year in January. 




Photos submitted by Asian Christian fellowship 






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The mission of Black Campus Ministry is rooted in the African-American expe- 
rience. Members assume responsibility for the spiritual growth of the Boston 
College community at large. With God as their focus, they aspire to achieve 
these goals through various activities strengthening community relations. As Christians, 
the group believes in serving the community of Boston College and the greater Boston 
area. Everything Black Campus Ministry does is in the name of the Lord and Savior, 
Jesus Christ. As a ministry, members are faith-oriented people dedicated to the enhance- 
ment of spiritual growth in both others and themselves. Furthermore, the purpose of 
Black Campus Ministry is also to increase community relations, encourage involve- 
ment, promote outreach and demonstrate support to others with guidance from God. 



Photos submitted by Black Campus Ministry 



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The Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship (XA) is a committed group of Christians who 
want to see a difference on Boston College campus today. XA are two Greek symbols 
pronounced "chi alpha" and represent the letters C and A. These two letters stand 
for "Christ's Ambassadors." The group aims to change their school by living out their faith in 
Jesus Christ on a daily basis. XA is more than just a club; it is a community of students from 
various backgrounds who are able to join together around the common belief that Christ is 
their Savior. The Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship wants to show all people that the awesome 
life is possible with Christ and that a relationship with Him is more than just church on Sunday 
morning. Their weekly meetings serve as a nice break from the hectic workweek that allows 
its members to come together to be encouraged in the faith and to lift up the name of Christ 
as a community of believers. In addition to two retreats each year, the organization unites 
with Chi Alpha groups from other Boston schools in an event known as "Friday Night Live." 



Photos submitted by Chi Alpha Christian Fclluwihil 





MILLEL 



Boston College Hillel serves as the center for Jewish life at Boston College. 
The Hillel helps to facilitate the social, cultural, and religious needs of the 
small but active group of Jewish students who attend Boston College. The 
organization is committed to a pluralistic vision of Judaism that embraces all move- 
ments and invites all members of the Boston College community to participate 
in its programs. It serves to educate the Boston College community about Jewish 
life and culture and offers itself as a resource to those interested in learning more. 




LIGHT 



Salt and Light is a Christian ministry group that serves the Greater Boston area 
by leading Confirmation retreats for high school students. The group has one 
training weekend every semester for members who are interested in leading those 
retreats. These weekends are held at the Mellos Retreat House in peaceful Jacksonville, 
Vermont. Salt and Light also meets for fellowship and fun every other week. Meet- 
ings usually consist of an icebreaker, witness talks, small group sharing, and snacks. 



Photos submitted by Salt & Light 





Photos submitted bji InterVarsitj Christian Fellowship 



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InterVarsity Christian Fellowship is a multi-ethnic. Catholic and Protestant, 
Christian movement at Boston College. It is a close-knit community of active 
students who seek to discover together how God and faith can impact their 
daily lives at Boston College and beyond. The group meets weekly, and has smaller 
group meetings, Bible studies, and prayer gatherings throughout the week as well 
as retreats and conferences throughout the year. The InterVarsity Christian Fel- 
lowship makes regular trips into Boston to feed the homeless, tutor students in the 
inner-city, and has spring break trips to serve the urban poor in Boston. Members 
seek not only to reach out and love the people at Boston College and in the Boston 
area, but also to the outside world through summer trips to foreign countries. 



SX T JUOM AS 



The St. Thomas More Society seeks to promote a rich Catholic culture at 
Boston College. The group sponsors lectures and debates about impor- 
tant religious and cultural issues. The organization also sponsors biweekly 
Power Hours. These are times of quiet, reflective prayer in the form of tradi- 
tional Eucharistic adoration and benedictions. All students are welcome to par- 
ticipate in any of the activities of the Society regardless of religious affiliation. 



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Coming from the Greek word "Koinonia," which means fellowship in Greek, 
Asian Baptist Student Koinonia (ABSK) is a student Christian group com- 
mitted to their fellowship with God and each other. The group's hope is 
to experience God's love concretely, whether by means of Bible studies, prayer, or 
fellowship (which consists of many forms, mainly fun indoor and outdoor activi- 
ties, like sports, hiking, BBQs, and eating a lot of food). Members study together, 
eat together, and make an effort to understand the meaning of life together. 



The Ignatian Society of Boston College is a group of Boston College under- 
graduate students committed to the promotion of Jesuit education and the 
Ignatian ideal. The group offers all BC students opportunities to actively 
engage the Mission of the University through social, spiritual, and service programs 
and events, and seeks to maintain a strong link between the Jesuit Community and 
the student body at Boston College. Members of the Ignatian Society are commit- 
ted to promoting Jesuit education and Ignatian spirituality, and strive to make the 
Boston College community a fun, faith-filled environment. The Ignatian Society 
offers spiritual programs such as the Kairos retreat and peer ministry. Its social pro- 
grams seek to strengthen the bond between two great communities here at Boston 
College: the undergraduate students and the Jesuits. The group also offers both 
traditional and innovative community service opportunities to its members and the 
Boston College community based on the ideals of Jesuit educational experience. 



Photos submitted by Ignatian So 






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'he purpose of the Carroll School of Man.agement Government (CSOM) 
is to serve as a promoter of better relationships between students, faculty 
members, and corporate America. Serving over 2,000 students, the organi- 
zation's goal is to sponsor various activities that are designed to assist students in 
pursuing their studies and future career paths. CSOM hosted various prominent 
executive keynote speakers, panelists, student-faculty integration events, published 
newsletters, and bridged communications between CSOM clubs and organiza- 
tions throughout the year. Furthermore, CSOM Government has been involved 
with the CSOM Dean search process, the Ethics core initiative. University Stra- 
tegic Planning process, and matters concerning professor promotion and tenure. 



Photos submitted by CSOM Government 




The mission of the College Republicans of Boston College is threefold. The orga- 
nization's first goal is to represent the Republican Party to the student body, and 
to promote Republican goals and interests on campus. The College Republicans 
must be vocal, advocating the timeless Republican ideals of fiscal conservatism, personal 
responsibility, and love of the country. Their second goal is to act on behalf of Republican 
candidates on and off campus, and to promote these candidates to the student body. The 
third goal of the organization is to create a strong link among the club, the Republican 
Party, and College Republicans throughout the state and the country. Each year there 
have been exciting Republican Speakers: Ben Stein, Dinesh D'Souza, Pat Buchanan, and 
Jay Severin have all been to The Heights, and this year will be just as promising. Members 
attend events with the Massachusetts Alliance of College Republicans each year, and stay 
in close contact with the National Committee. There are ample opportunities to net- 
work and make friends across the state and the country, all the while having a great time. 



Photos submitted by College Republican 



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'he College Democrats of Boston College is both an officially registered student orga- 
nization and a chartered member of the Massachusetts College Democrats, a subsid- 
iary of the Massachusetts Democratic Party. The organization seeks to involve and 
educate the student body with regard to, not only politics, but also public service. Its purpose 
is to show students the benefits of public service both on and off campus. This year saw the 
launching of two major initiatives for the College Democrats. First, the group began the 
Progressive Speaker Series, which features Boston City Councilor Felix Arroyo, Congress- 
man Barney Frank, and former Governor and Presidential Candidate Howard Dean. This 
program was easily the largest in the history of the organization, and helps to represent its 
incredible growth. The club aimed to involve as many people in the Presidential Election as 
possible, registering close to two hundred students and helping nearly six hundred students 
obtain absentee ballots. The College Democrats attempt to voice the progressive message 
in hopes of carrying out an expansion of the Democratic Party and its beliefs and ideals. 



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'hotos submitted by College Democrats 



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The Model United Nations (Model UN) is a simulation of the United Na- 
tions system. Students assume the roles of ambassadors to the United 
Nations, and debate the current issues on the UN's agenda. Through 
diplomacy and negotiation, Model UN students seek ways that the world com- 
munity can deal with complex global concerns such as the environment, eco- 
nomic development, refugees, AIDS, conflict resolution, disarmament and hu- 
man rights. The Model UN travels to conferences throughout the United States 
and Canada, and has successfully represented various countries at these events. 





MOCI^JRIAL 

Mock Trial is a student activity at Boston College designed to provide a forum for 
undergraduate Boston College students interested in learning about our country's 
legal system. Mock Trial is for students interested in the field of law, or those that 
want to put their theatrical or debating talents to the test. Students can participate as at- 
torneys or witnesses (or both), or can take less theatrical roles as timekeepers or alternates. 
Students are placed on individual teams and work during the year to prepare both the de- 
fense and the plaintiff/prosecution arguments, questions, and witnesses based on the fact pat- 
tern the program receives from the American Mock Trial Association. The BC Mock Trial 
teams compete at various intercollegiate competitions throughout the year, including the 
American Mock Trial Association's Regional Competition held at other universities int he 
Northeast. All teams have a chance at competing in the National Tournaments held in St. 
Paul, Minnesota and Des Moines, Iowa. For the past seven years, the Mock Trial Program has 
sent teams to Nationals where they competed amongst the toughest teams in the country. 



Photos submitted by Mock Trial Program 



The Fulton Debate Society is a nationally-competitive intercollegiate debate team 
with a strong tradition at Boston College. Members of the Fulton Debate Society 
compete in two-person teams in policy debate against students from other colleges 
and universities across the country. Boston College competes in the Novice, Junior Varsity, 
and Varsity divisions of debate. Novice debaters are those who have no previous experience 
in policy debate in high school or college (although debaters with only Lincoln-Douglas 
and/or forensics experience are eligible to compete in novice debate). The Junior Varsity 
division is open to all students with less than two years of experience in college policy 
debate. Varsity debaters generally have extensive high school debate experience and/or two 
to three years of college debate. Boston College students debate the topic selected by the 
national Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA) and National Debate Tournament 
(NDT). The topic is the same for all tournaments in the academic year. Each team will 
debate both the affirmative and negative sides of the topic several times at each tournament. 



Photoi iubmiiud by Fu/ton Debate SoliiH 





Photos submitted by Student Judicial Board 



STUX5ENT 



The members of the Boston College Student Judicial Board are representatives of the 
student body in its entirety, it is their responsibility to not only conduct hearings, but 
also educate the entire student body about their rights. Their role on campus is to offer 
students the opportunity to be heard in a fair and impartial environment by a board of peers. 
After hearing the cases, the Student Judicial Board determines responsibility and issues sanctions 
to be reviewed by the Dean for Student Development. In addition to strictly hearing cases, 
the Student Judicial Board seeks to establish and maintain respect for truth, self, and others, 
in both the local and surrounding community. In each other and the cases they adjudicate, 
their objective is to further educate students of both their rights and their responsibilities as 
members of the Boston College community. They strive to maintain and uphold community 
I standards, and in keeping with the Jesuit tradition, they also encourage sound moral judgment. 



ACCOUlNlXING 



The Boston College Accounting Academy is a student organization established 
by and run by Accounting students. The Academy was established to pro- 
vide declared and prospective Accounting majors with services pertaining 
to their future careers. In order to provide opportunities to come in contact with 
prospective future employers, the Accounting Academy organizes events where 
students, teachers, and employers can come together in a relaxed environment. 




Photos submitted b^i Student Organization Funding Committee 



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he Student Organization Funding Committee (SOFC) is charged with fund- 
ing student organizations who meet the eligibility requirements set forth 
the SOFC constitution. Approximately 130 organizations at Boston 



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College presently exist that can receive funding. The money allocated by SOFC 
comes from 47% of the Student Activities Fee, which is collected by the University 
along with tuition. The Student Organization Funding Committee is a separate and 
distinct organization from the Undergraduate Government of Boston College and 
operates under its own constitution and bylaws. The goal of the group is to assist 
student groups in putting on enriching events for the Boston College community 
without the group having to be overly concerned with the funding of the event. 



BELL^RMINE 



The Bellarmine Pre-Law Council (BPLC) stands as the only student organization 
providing leadership for those students interested in attending law school. The 
club works with students, the University Dean's Office, and outside professionals, 
organizations, and academic centers as a means to provide for these needs. Throughout the 
year, the BPLC organizes mock LSAT administrations, negotiates discounts for BC students 
on LSAT courses, coordinates speakers and presentations regarding law and the legal pro- 
fessionals, compiles data from law school applicants, and sponsors field trips and forums. 















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INfVEScTVIENT 

t 1 'he Boston College Investment Club was founded in 1983 by William Doty, a 
1 Junior Economics major, as one of the first undergraduate investment clubs in 
JL the country. He saw the value in a student-run organization that managed its 
own real life portfolio of equities and could provide the skill sets Wall Street was look- 
ing for. Doty envisioned an organization where students would see firsthand what goes 
into making financial decisions and where novice investors could gain experience. The 
mission of the club is to provide a stimulating business environment in which members 
discuss the financial markets and manage a portfolio of over twenty securities and a 
quarter million dollars of Boston College's endowment. The Investment Club also 
aims to analyze investment opportunities and research stocks within different sectors 




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The purpose of this student chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery 
(ACM) is to promote interest in the field of Computer Science. By bringing together 
students and faculty, the ACM hopes to provide a forum in which people can share 
common interests outside of the classroom. Aside from monthly meetings, the Boston College 
Association for Computing Machinery hosts a guest lecture series, attends outside lectures 
at other colleges and universities, and partakes in the annual ACM Programming Contest. 




Phiitijs submitted b> Andrew Lo/^'uii 




OPERATIONS 



The Boston College Operations Academy is a student-run organization that aims to 
raise awareness of the Operations concentration among those in the Carroll School 
of Management. The Operations Academy hopes to facilitate job contacts in the 
business world by providing an Operations community in which declared and prospective 
Operations concentrators can feel confident in their role in the future business community. 



Photos submitted b^ Operations Academy 



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The Political Science Association attempts to establish relationships between 
the faculty of the Political Science Department and the undergraduate student 
body. The organization believes that by organizing events during which stu- 
dents and professors can interact, there can be a greater success level toward this goal. 
The Political Science Association is firmly committed to the discussion forum, which 
is the first step in understanding the science of politics. Another goal that this asso- 
ciation attempts to accomplish is to spark interest in the field and study of politics. 





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The Boston College Minority Association of Pre-health Students (MAPS) strives to 
prepare and support under-represented pre-health students with the knowledge, 
skills, and experience necessary when pursuing and attempting to enroll in health 
institutions for future careers as health professionals. With frequent meetings throughout 
the year led by Dr. David Krauss, the group offers a wealth of information to the students of 
Boston College and offer many opportunities to connect with alumni in the medical field. 



Photos submitted by MAPS 



INFOaMe^TION 



The Information Technology Club is dedicated to bringing Boston College undergraduate stu- 
dents more in tune with technology and technological developments in business. Through a 
membership of this club, students will have the opportunity to hear speakers from the industry, 
go to company headquarters in Boston, learn about technology through special tutorials, and more. 



O'CO^NELL 

O'Connell House was constructed at the turn of the 20th century for approxi- 
mately $300,000; the mansion resembled a royal palace at the time, filled 
with lavish furnishings and surrounded by fragrant gardens and beautiful 
fountains. The house was later donated to Boston's Cardinal O'Connell, who used 
the house as his official residence and spiritual haven; the Church then donated the 
house to the growing Boston College. Since the fall of 1972, the O'Connell House 
has served the Boston College community as the home of the official student union in 
addition to providing office space for the Office of First Year Experience. On a social 
level, O'Connell House seeks to entertain, educate, and facilitate all Boston College 
students through a variety of events and gatherings. It's the home of weekly events 
including live bands, coffee house concerts, student talent nights, lectures, and more. 







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ORD^a^QF THE 

I lounded in 1937, the Order of the Cross and Crown is the oldest and most 
1^ prestigious honor society in the College of Arts and Sciences. It recognizes senior 
JL men and women who both demonstrate academic excellence by maintaining an 
overall cumulative grade point average of at least A- and establish records of unusual 
ser\'ice and leadership on the campus over their undergraduate careers. The selection 
committee, made up of the deans and faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences, also 
selects particularly distinguished seniors as Marshals and Chief Marshal of the Order. 


Bs^HT^K v^^^^^H^^ ^^^^^^^^^1 




Photos .submitted by Order of the Cross and Crown 








'^ ^^-^ ^^-^strStiAentsJ'' ^^-^'X^ 



The Society of Physics Students (SPSS) is comprised of physics majors at Boston College, 
and its main purpose is to take physics heyond the classroom. The group sponsors lectures 
hy both Boston College and guest faculty, which have included Nobel Laureates, to pres- 
ent their theoretical and experimental research. Also, the SPSS explores active research taking 
place outside of Boston College, such as laboratories of neighboring universities and science 
centers. The Society of Physics Students encourages physics majors of all levels to work together 
to increase their own appreciation for physics, as well as to help non-majors understand it better. 



otos submitted i)> Society of Physics 



LADIES 



The purpose of Ladies in Business is to develop a positive perspective and understand- 
ing of the dual roles of today's businesswomen. Students at Boston College need 
more exposure and knowledge of the intricacies involved in balancing a business 
career and family. Positive female role models, who have succeeded in blending the role 
of mother and executive, are essential. Such women would provide students with helpful 
information as they continue their studies and eventually enter the workforce. Ladies in 
Business will provide a female perspective of the business world through events and programs. 




UDUCATION 



AWARENESS H JDSTICE 
UJ (J) h 

UDNVHOiVIOOS 



Flyer courtesy of Just Art Exhibit 



J USX ART 



n May of 2003 the very first Just Art event was held at Boston College. A collab- 
orated project between the Global Justice Project and UNICEF's Boston College 
.chapter, the exhibit hopes to bring critical attention to bear on issues of social jus- 
tice. Paintings, sculpture, poetry, photography, and music, among other mediums, are dis- 
played for five days in the Cabaret Room of Vanderslice Hall, where there is also a key- 
note speaker, live musical performances, comedy, film festival, and open mic night for 
those who wish to convey their concerns for global justice. A Catholic service is held 
to remember the women, men, and children suffering poverty and alienation around 
the world. This exhibit hopes to lay the groundwork for a greater call for social justice. 



I 





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The Carroll School of 
Management Honors 
Program is a group of stu- 
dents who are being educated to 
lead the businesses and commu- 
nities of tomorrow. The program 
demonstrates that setting high 
expectations, giving students 
responsibility, and encouraging 
cooperation among peers leads 
to levels of achievement and 
understanding that are reward- 
ing on many levels. This group 
oftalented and highly motivated 
students pursue excellence 
inside and outside the classroom. 



Scholarship, community service, and leadership, the precepts of 
the Program, create an environment that is charged for growth, 
learning, and enriched experiences. Students receive an in- 
depth education coupled with a liberal arts core curriculum that 
is required ot all Boston College students. All students then choose 
one or more concentrations in a specific management discipline. 





XONT 



t)l lege Urbai-Projee t 




The Boston College 
Urban Project (BCUP) 
will engage the larger 
Boston College community 
in social, political, and eco- 
nomic topics and public policy 
questions relating to city life 
and government. Through 
forums, speakers, historic tours 
of the Boston metro-region, 
and student policy research 
and initiatives, the BCUP will 
endeavor to understand urban 
problems and issues through 
on-campus study and discus- 
sion and through off-site visits. 





The Boston College Urban Project is a new 
club this year. There is no service component 
to the organization. 





T ^XY 

Student Life Committee*- 





The Quality of Student 
Life Committee (QSLC) 
works with Vice Presi- 
dents, Deans, Administrators, 
and Academic Departments, 
striving to provide students 
with a means to understand 
BC and create opportunities to 
better their environment. It was 
formed in November 200 1 by six 
freshman who wanted to further 
understand their surroundings 
and to improve Ufe on and around 
campus. The QSLC was formed 
for the students by the students. 




Photos subm itted by QSLC 



Today, the Committee is a registered student organization made 
up of 24 active members and over 170 general members. As a 
non-political group, QSLC's goal is to act as an advocacy group 
for the students and as a vehicle for students to further define 
and create their own initiatives effectively and constructively. 






Y: 



our voice in the residence 
halls. The goal of the Res- 
idence Hall Association 
(RHA) is to be an advocate for 
residents' concerns and provide 
programming. Comprised of an 
executive board and representa- 
tive councils from each housing 
area, the RHA is a student-run 
organization sponsored by the 
Office of Residential Life. Past 
RHA programs niclude Mr. 
Boston College, Fall Movie 
Night, Breaking the Barriers 
Ball, and Spring Fest. 



Issues that have been addressed by RHA include 
smoking on campus and decisions with new 
residence halls. The programs and issues are 
generated by the students, and are constantly 
evolving to reflect current issues and trends. 



*. » I « 






Photos submitted by RHA 





XON 






Boston College Student 
Agencies (BCSA) is 
sponsored by the Office of 
the Dean for Student Develop- 
ment (ODSD). Founded in 1983, 
BCSA is a student-run organiza- 
tion, providing a unique oppor- 
tunity for BC students to gain 
real world business experiences 
through on campus part-time 
employment. BCSA is currently 
composed of 5 agencies and 4 
functional departments in order 
to fulfill the needs and inter- 
ests of everyone ranging from 
faculty to students to parents. 




The vision of BCSA is to provide a profes- 
sional setting embodying the entrepreneurial 
spirit, where BC students can find meaning- 
ful employment, gain managerial experience, 
and offer practical and useful services to 
fellow students, parents, faculty, and staff. 



Photos submitted by BCSA 





GAY? FI^P BY ME 




In April 2004, Boston Col- 
lege students, faculty, and 
staff wore T-shirts with the 
slogan, "Gay? Fine by Me," an 
idea borrowed from schools such 
as Duke and Notre Dame. The 
Undergraduate Government of 
Boston College and the Women's 
Resource Center co-sponsored 
the event. The blue shirts were 
a visual representation of Boston 
College as a more accepting 
community than some believe. 
"Gay? Fine by Me" encom- 
passes a message of acceptance. 




Photos submitted b\ \hkc Yuksich 





Last year, volunteers distributed about 600 
shirts the week before the event, and reminded 
people to wear them with banners. This event 
isnowatradition, and will be held this coming 
April. 





FINANCE 



'he Boston College Finance Academy is a student-run organization whose 
intent is to inform students of all the opportunities available to them in the 
world of finance. A main objective of the academy is to bring together the 
academic and business worlds through meetings, panels, and career nights. Events 
are planned to benefit members in matters such as general information on current 
topics in finance, career planning, and possible job placement. The Finance Academy 
offers services such as career and academic peer advisement. 



T; 



Photo submitted by Finance Academy 



ECOI^QMICS 

The purpose of the Economics Association is to promote a better understanding 
of economics, and to further the economics-related knowledge and opportuni- 
ties available to interested students. These initiatives are achieved through 
the encouragement and facilitation of interactions between students and faculty 
through regular meetings and a number of social and informational events. The 
Association strives to provide helpful information for students concerning econom- 
ics-related internships, post-undergraduate study options, and careers. It is a newly 
founded club as of 2003, and has just become active this year. The group has general 
meetings as well as events catered to various speakers discussing different econom- 
ics-related topics. These topics are chosen by a vote of all active members to ensure 
that the Economics Association is providing members with information that they 
are interested in. Being able to provide information is one of the most satisfying of 
the Association's accomplishments. 




Students 



T^S?i^ 4ir Hrt^rlsf Tbw^rdfoii 



tive Heights 



Students Taking an Interest Towards Creative Heights (S.Tl.TC.H.) is a student-run orga- 
nization that seeks to enrich and enhance the lives of the Boston College community by 
recognizing the domestic arts and reintroducing this lost art form to both men and women. 
The crafts made in S.Tl.TC.H. are sold, and the process are given to charity. This is the 
organization's first year, but it hopes to have many great memories. S.Tl.TC.H. will be 
participating in the Arts Festival, and will have a cafe where crafts will be sold for charity. 



Pliotos submitted by S.T.I.T.C.H. 




The mission of Allies is to advance the understanding of issues, concerns, and 
needs regarding sexual orientation among undergraduates at Boston Col- 
lege. Allies offers undergraduate members of the Boston College community 
the opportunity to consider issues concerning sexuality and sexual orientation in 
the context of the University's Jesuit, Catholic tradition. This tradition teaches 
that all human beings are created in the image and likeness of God and are thus 
to be valued, treated with respect, and enabled to feel welcome and appreciated at 
Boston College whether they are heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, transgender, 
or question in regard to sexual orientation. Allies recognizes that psychosexual 
development is a critical component of personal identity and that all persons, 
independent of their sexual orientation are called to integrity, generosity, and indi- 
vidual responsibility. The focus of Allies is education and support, not advocacy. 









1 ^ oston College members of Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps 
h"^ (NROTC) not only wake up at obscene hours of the morning for 

.1 -/workouts and classes, they make the extra effort and travel all the 

way to Boston University. The mission of Navy ROTC is to develop 
midshipmen morally, mentally, and physically, and to imbue them 
with the highest ideals of duty, honor, and loyalty in order to commis- 
sion college graduates as naval officers who possess a basic professional 
background, are motivated towards careers in the naval service, and 
have potential for future development in mind and character so as to 
assume the highest responsibilities to command, citizenship, and gov- 
ernment. The NROTC accomplishes its mission through education and 
training in essential naval subjects at civilian educational institutions. 




^B^^B l\ u ^^^^^^^^B^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Bjfll 


^mm^^^ 




Photo submitted by NROTC 







ARMY ROTC 



Army ROTC recruits and trains cadets, and commissions them at the end of 
senior year as Second Lieutenants in the United States Army. Some of the 
favorite memories of Army ROTC include comradeship, helicopter training, 
training camp at Fort Lewis, Washington and follow-on summer training. There is 
also the annual Dining In, where the ROTC practicies military customs and tradi- 
tions in a formal dining environment, and the Military Ball. For this event, the Army 
ROTC gathers in a different location each year, favoring hotels and harbor cruise 
ships, while celebrating the year with a night of dancing. Boston College is a part 
of the Liberty Battalion, an ROTC group that also incorporates ROTC programs at 
Northeastern Uni%'ersity, Wentworth, and a few other smaller schools. The Boston 
College Company Advisors are Captain Brett Tashiro and Master Sergeant Brian Mollis. 




Photos submitted by Army ROTC 



ST 




KfT 




The Student Admissions Program (SAP) is the largest 
volunteer organization on campus at Boston Col- 
lege. In any given year there are between 700 and 
900 volunteer members in the program. Working directly 
with the Office of Undergraduate Admission, SAP offers 
current Boston College students the chance to assist in the 
recruitment of prospective students. From serving as tour 
guides (who lead families around campus and answer their 
questions) and panelists to Day Visit hosts and greeters, 
Student Admissions Program volunteers often act as the 
first ambassadors for visitors to Boston College. The first 
moment a prospective student enters the admissions office, he 
or she is greeted by not only a wealth of on hand admissions 
officers but current students as well who are only willing to 
help our with any questions or concerns. Within the SAP, 
there are nine programs. The SAP Coordinators Council is 
made up of 11 students who each run a program in SAP. The 
Student Admissions Program culminates each year with the 
FUN that IS April - up to 1000 visitors through the office 
each and every day. Volunteers enjoy what they do as they 
get to meet many different people from all over the world. 



Every year, it is through the help of the SAP 
volunteers that accepted high school seniors 
are able to visit the campus and meet fellow 
acceptees, while also having the chance to 
talk with current students. 




THE PERCH 



You may be asking yourself, "What is The Perch?" Briefly, The Perch is Friday 
nights at the Starbucks Cafe in McElroy. The Perch provides a venue for a 
variety of activities and student groups including student musiciaiis, entertain- 
ment, movies, board games, talent nights, and poetry jams. All free of cost! ! ! It is also 
a place to hang out for those Friday nights when you have nothing to do. The cafe has 
recently been renovated with the addition of furniture and a 36" screen TV! The Perch 
is a perfect place to enjoy a cup of coffee, to play one of several board games provided, 
or to study. Its hours are from 9pm - midnight on Fridays throughout the semester. 
The Perch is programmed by a student committee with representatives from various 
student organizations including Peer Education Network (PEN), Another Choice on 
Campus (ACC), and the Undergraduate Government of Boston College (UGBC). 



Organiy^rinns 




lOCOl 



quc 



The Sexual Chocolate Step Squad of Boston College was formed as another 
outlet to express one's dance creativity. While several dance groups have 
formed and exist on campus, none have been dedicated to the sole focus 
on step dancing. The group practices weekly in McElroy Commons and can he 
detected from far distances by their upbeat and lively movements on the floor of 
the building. Sexual Chocolate offers a limited number of performances through- 
out the year, usually in collaboration with fellow BC dance and music groups. 





The Boston College Percussion Ensemble is a 14 member group that performs at 
the annual spring Arts Festival and in the combined performances at Gasson Hall, 
which occur frequently throughout the year. Literature includes unconventional 
arrangements of classical pieces in addition to contemporary works by renowned composers. 




Stylus is the Art and Literature magazine of Boston College. Stylus was founded in 
1 882, and is thus not only the oldest extracurricular activity at Boston College, 
but also the oldest journal of any Catholic university in the Americas. Stylus 
originally served the roles of newspaper, yearbook, and artistic journal. With the advent 
of other groups on campus (The Heights and Sub Turri), Stylus is now able to focus 
on its original mission: presenting the artistic endeavors of undergraduates of Boston 
College and the outside world. Stylus always welcome input from its rcadinf^ audience. 




THE HEIGHTS 



The Heights is the University's independent student newspaper and 
one of its largest student groups with about 150 students on staff. This 
semester the newspaper began printing twice a week, on Mondays and 
Thursdays. This is the largest initiative that The Heights has accomplished 
since its creation in 1919. Its goal is to provide fair and accurate news of inter- 
est to the undergraduate students of Boston College and the greater Boston 
College community. The newspaper also serves as an independent forum for 
the opinions ot the Boston College community. The Heights holds itself to the 
highest ethical standards in its journalistic and business operations, and its pri- 
mary responsibility is to its readers, particularly the students of Boston College. 




Dance Marathon at Boston College is a yearly event held in February where 
the student body comes together to enjoy a night of danciiig in celebration 
of money raised for a charity. For the last three years Dance Marathon has 
raised money to support the Children's Hospital in Boston and this year surpassed 
their previous year's amount with a total of more than $73,000. Dancers and Moral- 
ers participate in this 16-hour event, which was held in the Plex this year, and stu- 
dents are invited to join in the festivities and to support their friends and classmates. 



THE OBSERVER 

As the only independei"it, conservative voice at Boston College, The Observer 
has seen a remarkable transformation since its debut in the spring of 1983. 
During the most recent incarnation, developed by Editor-in-Chief Christopher 
L. Pizzo A&S '05, The Observer's mission has been to promote and defend traditional 
political and religious values both within Boston College and beyond. The Observer 
has strongly championed the ideals ot Western Civilization, the free market, limited 
government, personal freedom and responsibility, and adherence to the Magisterium 
of the Catholic Church, along with the witty and sarcastic commentary that has 
made it famous. Taking seriously the values to which Boston College is committed as 
a Catholic university in the Western tradition. The Observer strives to promote the 
highest quality of journalism by providing a forum for news, opinion, and editorial 
of BC that otherwise would not exist. Without question. The Observer is the single 
most influential student publication as it is ready by liberals and conservatives alike. 



FLOEXRY 



Floetry's purpose is to provide a dynamic forum for students to express them- 
selves through urban verse and receive feedback from their peers, as well as 
discuss issues pertaining to the urban lifestyle. Furthermore, they wish to fos- 
ter an appreciation and understanding of a musical/cultural movement that is of- 
ten perceived as negative by opening the forum to the general student population. 



U 



NAKED SMDLARITT 



Photos submitted by Naked Singularity Magazine 




ml^i 



As the description of this independant magazine of Boston College states: A 
"naked singularity," as we all know, is an infinitely dense point mass around which 
no black hole can develop. Several centuries ago, the buzz around the (Dead 
White Male) world was "Nature abhors a vacuum." Now it might aptly be said "Nature 
abhors a naked singularity." (Stephen Hawking said it, and he had a guest spot on Star 
Trek The Next Generation, so, in fact, it might be more than aptly said.) Therefore, it 
is the hope of Naked Singularity to invoke some of that abhorrence, and to push the 
bounds of acceptance understanding and commensurahility forward a few light years. 




Crossroads was founded in the Spring of 2000 by a group of seniors dedicated 
to bring Christ's message more fully to the Boston College campus. It is a 
Catholic newspaper born in love, seeking the Truth. The paper is published 
on alternating Mondays throughout the academic semester. Crossroads engages in 
dialogue with the University community, calling all to active participation in this 
search for Truth. The fortnightly, produced by members of the Boston College com- 
munity, attends to the highest journalistic standards in both its news and editorial 
content. Crossroads offers Christian witness and embraces the values to which BC 
is committed, foremost among them tidelity to Christ, His Church, and her servant 
the Magisterium; an ongoing reflection on the Western cultural and intellectual 
tradition; communion with other traditions and values; and fuller realization of 
the vision of St. Ignatius Loyola in the life of the University. In its pursuit of a 
vibrant exchange of ideas. Crossroads encourages response from the student body. 






WZBC is Boston College's student-run radio station. Originally founded as 
WVBC, the voice of Boston College, the radio station began in 1960 as a 
carrier-current AM station, broadcasting solely to the University community 
through the electrical wiring of on-campus buildings and dormitories. After operating 
in this capacity for 13 years, BC Radio took a big step by applying for a license to open 
and operate WZBC - FM, a nine watt, educationally-oriented station at the frequency 
90.3. With the advent of WZBC - FM, the radio station expanded its listenership to 
begin serving the outside community. Through locally based programs, WZBC proposed 
to link area residents with the University. A power increase was given to WZBC in 
1974, bringing the station up to its current output of 1 000 watts and allowing once again 
for an expansion in listenership. Since the initial format change, WZBC has grown 
to become one of the most influential and respected college stations in the country. 



WVBC 



WVBC is the on-campus sister station of WZBC - Newton 90.3 FM, Boston 
College radio, and broadcasts through BC Cable Channel 47. It encour- 
ages all students to get involved, even those with no previous radio experi- 
ence. First and foremost, a WVBC DJ must have a love for music; everything else is 
secondary. To be a WVBC DJ you need no prior broadcast experience, and the music 
you play need not be a certain genre. WVBC is for the students, by the students! 



UNICEF 



The UNICEF chapter of Boston College seeks to continue the tradition 
upheld by the national organization in its quest to raise support for the 
programs implemented and proposed by the United Nations Children's 
Fund, among others. It also increases public awareness of the challenges facing the 
world's children. The chapter at BC raises money to add to that raised by at least 
hundreds of other schools and universities around the country as well as volun- 
teering in campaigns to change policies that will greatly benefit the less fortunate. 



AJ 





lip 



Conceived in 1997, the AHANA Leadership Academy (ALA) has provided 
training, resources, and advice to emerging AHANA freshman leaders. The 
need to promote high academic standards as well as an active social and 
political conscience has charged ALA with the task of developing a proving ground 
for freshman students. During the school year, ALA holds dorm talks, meetings, 
and group dinners, creating a forum for discussions of AHANA issues and methods 
by which to address them. ALA members are official members of the AHANA 
Leadership Council and are placed in various departments. Along with the execu- 
tive staff, department directors, and ALC members, ALA members are surrounded 
with mentors and given opportunities to expand on their current and newfound 
leadership skills. ALA is a beginning, not an end, to their leadership capacities. 






The Slavic Club is a joint effort by native Slavs, students, and faculty 
across various departments to learn from one another about Slavic cul- 
tures and languages. Throughout the year, the Slavic Club organizes a 
wide range of social and educational activities such as group trips to film festivals 
and plays, volunteering at conferences, social gatherings to celebrate Eastern 
European holidays, and a faculty-student banquet at the end of each semester. 



Photos submitted by Slavic Club 



sp^g A L 

Special Olympics Boston College (SOBC) was founded by members of the class 
ot 2005 in their sophomore year at Boston College. SOBC is both a local pro- 
gram for individuals with intellectual disabilities in the greater Boston area 
and a fundraising organization at BC. Over 200 BC students have contributed to the 
development of SOBC over the past two years by volunteering as unified partners 
in soccer and volleyball or plunging into the Atlantic in the middle of the winter. 
SOBC holds practice once a week and competes in two competitions per season. More 
than 20 athletes participate in the program, competing with BC students in the Fall 
Soccer Tournament and the Summer Games. One of our greatest memories was on 
February 14th, 2004 at the 6th Annual Passion Plunge. In 2003, four members raised 
$1,000 to benefit the athletes of SOBC, and only one year later, members raised over 
ten times that amount when forty students decided to take the plunge and raised 
over $10,000 to plunge into the Atlantic Ocean at Nantasket Beach in Hull, MA. 



Photos submitted by Special Olympics 




^ ^ ^ys and Gifis Au 




The Heights Boys & Girls Club of Boston College is a mentoring program that 
brings together a group of approximately 50 BC students with a group of elementary 
school children from inner-city Boston. The group volunteers on a weekly basis 
with the children to form close bonds and to encourage the young students to try 
their best and learn in school. In addition to teaching the children in a variety of 
subjects, the Boston College students play and spend quality time with the children. 



Lesbian, -fey, and^Aexuat-Gd': 



immunity 



The Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Community at Boston College (LGBC) is a 
student organization, established in 1974. The organization exists to promote 
those basic rights to friendship, respect, and justice among students, faculty, 
and staff of the Boston College community by encouraging an environment of under- 
standing for all members of this community. The aim of LGBC within the BC com- 
munity is to provide an environment where members of the University can address 
the range of issues which arise around minority sexual orientations in modern society. 



Snowboard 



CW^ 



The Ski and Snowboard Club has been referred to as the largest and most fun 
organization at Boston College. This club organizes group ski and snowboard 
trips and "social events" for the students that choose to participate. Some of 
the trips planned were to Jackson Hole (Wyoming), Quebec City (Quebec), Killing- 
ton (Vermont), Mt. Snow (Vermont), and Whistler (British Columbia). The Ski and 
Snowboard Club is also notorious for the "Running of the Bulls," a Red Bull sponsored 
traveling costume party, and the Huckfest Diving Extravaganza at the Diving Boards. 



LSOE SE>s[ATE 



The LSOE Senate is an undergraduate student senate that serves as an inter- 
mediary between the administration and the students in the Lynch School 
ot Education. It consists of about twenty-five active members of all years and 
four student officers who work together to organize activities, to promote spirit, and 
to aid the student body. The Senate has organized Spirit of Ed Week, Cuisine and 
Conversations, a political discussion prior to the election, and sent items to support 
the troops in Iraq. 




GO LDEM.,^ EY 

The Boston College chapter of the Golden Key National Honor Society strives 
to maintain an active presence outside the classroom through its leadership, 
service, and academic activities while recognizing outstanding and meritorious 
achievement of students inside the classroom. Each year, over two hundred of the 
top students at Boston College are honored with membership of the Society. How- 
ever, student participation does not end after induction. Members are encouraged to 
participate in the many activities that the Society plans and coordinates. In the past 
year, the Boston College chapter of the Golden Key National Honor Society hosted 
the Regional Conference of the Society, planned a graduate exam strategy session, 
served at a homeless veteran shelter, and sponsored several veterans for the holidays 
among other things. The upcoming years look to be just as active. 



I'hnlos submitted by Golden Key National Honor Society 





The Geology Club of Boston College focuses on research and educational activi- 
ties that are supported by the Geology and Geophysics programs within the 
school. The club sponsored a Coyote walk at the beginning of the school year 
to investigate the habits of the animals in the forests close to the Newton campus. 
The group also sponsors guest speakers who come to talk about the complex issues 
facing the world and the ecological problems facing the world in light of pollurion 
and environmental degradation. 



ENOUSH 



The English Association strives to bring together the community of literary 
lovers and gives them a forum where their voices can be heard. With a con- 
tinually growing membership, the English Association hopes to increase the 
awareness of literary events in the surrounding Boston as well as those hosted by 
Boston Colleges own literary scholars. They also host a career fair with alumni who 
have built careers in the English and literary fields to help the English majors here at 
Boston College plan for their futures. 



Student Commu 



[^ airti^abh^r4»re-tS'e 



fealth Experience 



The Student Community Outreach for Pre-Health Experience (SCOPE) is an 
organization committed to placing Boston College students in health-related 
volunteering positions. SCOPE is predominantly aftiUated with Brigham and 
Women's Hospital, Children's Hospital, and Beth Israel Medical Center. Besides 
from volunteering, the organization holds advisory and reflection based meetings. 
The club's goal is to provide upperclassmen with an opportunity to get exposed to 
the health field and to learn from the experiences of upperclassmen who have had 
such experiences. 




MEMPEL 



The Mendel Society of Boston College is a pre-health and biology club that focuses 
on bioethics, biology careers, and volunteer opportunities. It assists pre-health stu- 
dents, those interested in pursuing further education and careers in the medical field, 
with internships and volunteer placements throughout the school year as well as 
during the summer and various breaks. Through the support of the school's alumni, 
the society holds frequent meetings to advise students on the latest information from 
medical and dental schools around the country as well as provides a forum for under- 
graduates to express concerns and find support. 



Photos submitted by Mendel Society 



INTER^.^'^araONAL 



The International Business Academy of Boston College (IBA) strives to bring inter- 
national economic awareness to students at BC. Through meetings and global guest 
speakers the group has addressed issues of the emerging markets of a variety of countries 
around the world in the hopes of broadening the horizons of their future business leaders. 



ENTREi^Je^ENEUR 



The Boston College Entrepreneur Society (BCES) provides the Boston Col- 
lege community with a forum for exploring all aspects of successful entrepreneur- 
ship. BCES has a twofold focus. Firstly, to give students the opportunity to learn 
about the world of entrepreneurship and the processes associated with it. Sec- 
ondly, to inform students about the dynamics of working in a startup environment. 



-^^^srfn^enfei^AdeJ^^ 



The AHANA Mangament Academy provides networking and socializing oppor- 
tunities for AHANA students in the Carroll School of Management. The Acad- 
emy sets up students with alumni of the school as well as internships throughout 
the year so that the students will gain invaluable work experience and con- 
nections that will help them later in their pursuit for a career in management. 






The Careers in Management cluh works to offer opporunities to undergraduates 
students with an interest in pursuing a job in the management field. Each year it 
sponsors the Career Launch, held January 14th this year, which is a free full-day 
event for juniors from all majors that gives them the opportunity to get interviewing, 
internship-searching, and etiquette skills to sharpen them for upcoming internship 
and job searches. The Launch features a panel of seniors who share their internship 
search stories, presentations by employers on behavioral interviewing, etiquette, 
and networking. Resume critiques are also offered on a first come first serve basis. 



MAR 



^cmlemy 



The goal of the Marketing Academy is to coordinate events for undergraduates 
to gain a better understanding of careers in the field of marketing. Events 
include speakers, such as the director of marketing for the Patriots, presenta- 
tions, including a proper business dress at Bloomingdales, a trip to New York City to 
visit an ad agency, this year being J. Walter Thompson, and the Finishing School, a 
way for students to prepare for interviews and other social events in business. 



Photos submitted by Anthony Tomaro 




J^4?ntl^i 



•aduate Re^< 



'a^h^urAal "^ 



Elements, one of Boston College's undergraduate research journals, was founded in 
September 2004 by a group of twenty undergraduate students. The journal published 
its first issue in April of 2005, featuring research articles written by BC undergrad- 
uates along with shorter special features. The goal of the publication is to become 
a forum for the exchange of original ideas within and across disciplines at the uni- 
versity. Staff members will read and evaluate all submitted manuscripts and select 
the best articles on the basis of quality of scholarship as well as readability. Fac- 
ulty members will be consulted to assist staff members in the evaluation process. 



^^-^ ^^— ^oWd4lenW§^^J^ J— ^ 



A major component of College Bound is the Mentor Program, designed to provide 
undergraduate students from Brighton and West Roxbury High Schools with additional 
support and resources as they work toward achieving their goal of furthering their 
education beyond high school. During the two to three hours each month, mentors 
get to know a student through such activities as visiting their high school, eating lunch 
with the mentees when on the campus of Boston College, and engaging in a special 
activity, on or off campus, of interest to both the student and the mentor. This might 
include going to the movies, an art museum, concert, athletic event, shopping, having 
pizza, visiting the Boston College campus, or touring other local college campuses. As 
such, College Bound mentors share a small part of their life, experiences, expertise, 
and time with College Bound students in what often amounts to lasting friendships. 



MACIN.XOSH 



The purpose of the Boston College Macintosh Users Group (BCMUG) is 
to provide a community that is informative, social, and supportive for those 
interested in the Macintosh and related technologies. Macintosh users are 
not highly represented on the BC campus but the group strives to promote its 
computers as well as products released by Apple Computers in the hopes that 
more will embrace its technology. In the past the group has sponsored video 
competitions with possible prizes such as a 20GB iPod. The group also attends the 
annual Mac users convention to discuss the latest news in the Macintosh world. 



Photos submitted by Macintosh Users Group 



MAtiJONG 



The Boston College Mahjong Club is established to provide all members of the 
Boston College community with the knowledge of mahjong's significance as 
Chinese consider mahjong the essence of the Chinese culture. Through this 
stress-releasing and fun entertainment, the mission of the Mahjong Club includes train- 
ing students to think strategically and analytically based on the nature and concept of the 
game in combination with its variations. Mahjong acts as a medium for networking, cul- 
tural and knowledge exchanges. The club serves to enrich Boston College's multicultural 
atmosphere through regular Mahjong gatherings. It once was a gambling game, but it has 
now evolved into a family game, which even young children play it in Oriental families. 



Photos submitted by MahjonK Cliil- 





I 



48 HOURS 

n order for new students to reevaluate their priorities and refocus on their lives at 
Boston College, the 48 HOURS program removes students from the distractions 
, and psychological noise of campus. Once away from the routine stimuli of campus, 
students begin a 48'hour weekend experience that is both personal and peer-oriented, 
with a goal ot constructing a valuable and rewarding college experience. This year 
specifically, the focus was centered around the Jesuit ideals which call us to be attentive, 
reflective, and loving. Senior leaders, Sophomore Point Guards, and Freshmen alike 
embraced these concepts on trips in the snow of Waterville Valley, NH, the sands of 
Hyannis, at the rock in Plymouth, as well as on the frozen tundra of Ogunquit, ME. 
The onus of the trips ultimately falls on the ability to take the lessons of 48 HOURS 
learned away from campus and translate them into the lexicon and daily routine of 
life back at BC. Through the leadership and sharing of the class of 2005, this was 
made not only possible, but wonderfully evident in action and word. 



I'hoUK submitted bv Kevin Burke 




Reti 



treat" 



The Halftime retreat is designed mainly for Sophomores but is open to Fresh- 
men and Juniors who would also like a chance to reflect on their Boston College 
careers. It is an introspective free retreat that includes guided workshops to help 
students reflect on their experiences, interests, and the directions they point 
to. For three days and two nights, students are brought to either the mountain- 
ous Snowy Owl Inn in New Hampshire or the Cortina Inn in Vermont where 
they can get away from the hectic and distracting ambiance of the city and college 
life. In addition to conversations with peers about talents, decisions, arid the fu- 
ture, the students are afforded a chance to build connections with faculty, deeper 
relationship with other students, and a clearer relationship with themselves. 



Photos submitted by David Hsu 




1 



Reti:eiit 



3Q is the Third Quarter retreat, symbolic of the Junior status as three quarters of the 
way through their undergraduate career, that gives Halftime alumni the opportunity 
to build upon their conversations from Halftime and continue the process of discem- 
merit. It is also open to Juniors who have not attended Halftime hut are interested 
in examining their college experience and what it points to. 3Q aims to aid Juniors 
in focusing the task of "being aware" into action during the second half of their time 
at BC. The retreat builds upon the questions asked on Halftime with an emphasis 
on implementing and acting upon their reflections and discernment questions right 
NOW. 3Q features a faculty Emcee and a panel of B.C. alumni and is facilitated 
by previous Halftime leaders. By sponsoring overnight retreats, on-campus speak- 
ers, and other social events. Third Quarter helps students continue to build on the 
three key questions and the three key "he's" explored during the Halftime weekend. 



nrgani7afinns 



TIJUANA, 



Students travel to Tijuana, Mexico where they work with Amor Ministries. The 
Amor mission trip is a short-term mission trip based on serving the local church 
in Mexico, and creating cross-cultural understanding through direct exposure 
to the Mexican culture. The goal of the Amor program is to understand the condi- 
tions of poverty through immersion, in addition to building a house in a developing 
nation. Combined with this project is a three day retreat over the course of the Easter 
Tridium. The retreat uses the act of service and the Passion of Christ to focus on a 
personal and spiritual experience of Christ's crucifixion on the cross, as seen through 
the suffering of our brothers and sisters in Mexico. 




Students travel to the border that runs between Tucsan, Arizona and Nogales, 
Mexico. Living together in both the United States and Mexico - including in 
the homes of Mexican families - students are exposed to a wide range of per- 
spectives related to life along the United States and Mexico border. BorderLinks, the 
non-profit organization that coordinates the immersion experience, organizes activi- 
ties such as tours of maquiladoras and discussions with factory managers, meetings 
with workers and their families in their communities, and discussions with activists 
who are committed to bringing about social change. 



URBAN 



During both the semester and spring breaks, 25 students (a different group 
each week) and a Boston College campus minister will live in Jamaica Plain, 
a neighborhood of Boston. Each day, they will work on a variety of projects 
which may include service in a foodbank, visitation with guests in one of Bostons 
shelters, and outreach to local elderly. During evening seminars, the group studies a 
variety of urban issues such as racism, homelessness, and theological perspectives on 
urban life. To ground our community in the love and justice of God, the group ends 
each day in a communal multi-faith prayer service. 



NICAE^AGUA 



For the past nine years, students have traveled to Nicaragua, an impoverished 
country in Central America, to spend time in an economically impoverished 
campesino community and experience firsthand the lives of people who struggle 
each day to feed their families, obtain clean drinking water and find a way to support 
themselves both individually and in community. Through meetings with educators, 
health care workers, politicians, and other community leaders, students spend time 
in both the capital city and in rural areas learning about the concerns of the people 
from various vantage points. 



— Volunteers --Jamaica ~ 



Students immerse themselves in the urban reality of Kingston, Jamaica, by serv- 
ing at several different outreach ministries, including an orphanage, a home 
for the elderly, and a home for children who are severely disabled. Additionally, 
students visit The Culture Yard, a museum dedicated to the artist who emerged from 
Trenchtown, Jamaica, and became a voice of liberation for Jamaicans living in oppres- 
sive situations. 




Each Winter break a group of students travel to the indigenous communities of 
Chenalho in Chiapas, the poorest and southernmost state in Mexico. The indig- 
enous residents of Chenalho live in abject poverty, almost entirely outside of the 
money economy. There is no running water and no electricity. Peasants live in 
one-room, wooden huts, empty inside except for small wood-burning stoves. Most 
speak only Tzotzil, their native language that descends from ancient Mayan. Stu- 
dents stay in a small Catholic parish on the outskirts of Chenalho, a short distance 
from the village where they visit and tutor at village schools and teach villagers 
about basic sanitation and hygiene for almost three weeks. Rather than perform 
direct service, however, students will spend the majority of the week simply "ac- 
companying" villagers in their daily lives: picking coffee and corn with farmers; 
praying and worshiping with community members; and eating dinner with families. 





Mextco 



Towards the end of May and for two weeks, a trip to Cuernavaca, Mexico, is 
sponsored by Campus Ministry. A campus minister, and other staff person or 
graduate assistant and two student leaders accompany the team to Mexico. It is 
a two week immersion program conducted at the Cuernavaca Center for IntercuUural 
Dialogue on Development. The program provides direct experience with the poor people 
of Mexico and Latin American refugees in their daily struggles for survival. In addi- 
tion to the staff at the Cuernavaca Center for IntercuUural Dialogue on Development, 
professors, social workers, medical personnel, and clergy participate in dialogue with 
BC students. Visits to the squatter settlement in Cuernavaca, the indigenous peoples 
in the mountain, Christian-based communities, and visits to historical sites round 
out the learning and intercultural dialogue. Biblical reflection, prayer, and dialogue 
fill each day with the dynamic of processing the experiences. 



MOZAMBIQUE 



Established in 2000, the Mozambique Service Program is an intense, unrivaled, 
eight-week service and immersion experience. While in Mozambique, the par- 
ticipants teach English in a local parish, live in community with one another, 
have opportunities for group and individual reflection, and form lasting friendships 
with Mozambicans. Sponsored since 2002 by the Center for Ignatian Spirituality, the 
Mozambique Service Program supports participants in the embodiment of the Jesuit 
mission of "men and women for others!' 



BEU^E 



Students travel to Seine Bight, on the Placencia Peninsula, in Belize, Central 
America. Living in a community center and working with Belizean teachers, 
students run a one - week winter camp for village children and teach in the 
regular school system the following week. Additionally, students spend time in Belize 
City engaging in community service projects and meeting with members of the local 
community. 



NOT FEATURED 

Against the Death Penalty 

Amnesty International 

Arab Students Association 

Arts & Sciences Association 

Biological Research Society 

College Bowl 

Computer Science Academy 

CSOM Academies 

Fine Arts Society 

Free Radicals of Boston College 

Ghana Service Trip 

Global Justice Project 

Habitat for Humanity 

Haiti Immersion Trip 

Ignacio Volunteers Mexico Immersion Trip 

LSOE Honors Program 

Madrigals 

Mathematics Society 

Minority Engineers 

MLK Student Activism Committee 

Multiracial Club 

Muslim Students Association 

National Student Nurses Association 

Operation Smile 

Orthodox Christian Fellowship 

People's Performing Arts Company 

Philosophy Association 

Psychology Club 

Rotoract Club 

Sociology Club 

Students for a Free Tibet 

Student Nurses Association 

Thai Students Association 



^^mm- 




SPORTS 

I EditedBy: 
Claire Mark ham 
Katl:aM5dz:elewskl 
■(Vyi-brey T^lxQig ,. 



><^^^»^^^^ he BIG EAST has been a foundation of life at Boston 
/ 1 College for many, many years. Last year, President 

^i^JjBi^^ Leahy announced that we would be leaving our 
sports "home" and moving to the Atlantic Coast Conference, a 
highly competitive, predominately southern conference. As many 
Eagles teams prepared for the move, they were determined to go out 
as winners. The 2004 football squad were co-BlG EAST champs and 
won their fifth consecutive bowl victory, the longest such streak in 
the nation. Then week after week we watched our men's basketball 
team remain undefeated until they recorded the best start for any 
team in Big East history, reached number three in the AP Coach's 
poll, the team's highest ranking in school history, and we threw 
out the rules as we stormed the courts after Syracuse. Not to be 
outdone, the women's team continuecl their impressive play and was 
consistently in the top 20 m the country. Men's hockey, though not 
effected by the move to the ACC, followed the lead of those that 
dominated Hockey East with impressive wins over Denver, North 
Dakota and others. And it wasn't just the big three sports that 
brought glory to the Heights. The co-ed sailing team had its most 
impressive season in recent memory; the men's and women's soccer 
teams both made it to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament. The 
men and women who participate in all of our varsity and club sports 
made their Superfans extremely proud. Marisa Fusco and Myra Chai 



FOOTBALL 

-Leavine the Big East in a Blaze of Glory- 



^^^^he Eaglcis tinushed last season with a record of 7-5 and 
I a win over Colorado State in the San Francisco Bowl. 
\- The football teani began the season with a 19-11 win 
c)ver Ball State. Will Blackmon returned a kickoff 96 yards 
tor a touchdown and quarterback Paul Peterson passed for 135 
yards. L.V. Whitworth rushed for 129 yards and a touchdown 
in the win. They followed this up with a 21-7 win at home 
over Penn State. Peterson passed for 199 yards and three 
touchdowns. David Kashetta scored on a pass from Peterson 
on the first drive of the game to give the Eagles an early lead. 
Junior linebacker Ray Henderson was named BIG EAST Co- 
Defensive Player of the Week following the victory as a result 
of his two interceptions, three tackles, and three pass breakups. 
The Eagles defeated University of Connecticut 27-7. Peterson 
passed for 193 yards arid two touchdowns and Andre Callender 
ran for another touchdown on 96 total yards. Ryan Ohlinger 
kicked his first field goal of his career early in the game to 
increase the Eagles lead. Following this win, quarterback Paul 
Peterson was named BIG EAST Co-Offensive Player of the 
Week. However, a 17-14 last minute loss at Wake Forest set 
the team back as they received a preview of their competition 
in the ACC next year, although Peterson passed for a career 
high 269 yards, and A.j. Brooks rushed for a career high 95 
yards and a touchdown. The following week, a decisive 29- 
7 victor^' over University of Massachusetts put them back 
where they had been. A.J. Brooks rushed for a career high 
and BC freshman record of 160 yards on his way to scoring 
two touchdowns. A heart-breaking 20-17 overtime loss to 
Pittsburgh followed. Peterson passed for a career high 367 yards, 
but the team was held to a season low mshing total of 56 yards. 
The highlight of the season was the 24-23 win over rival Notre 
Dame with only 54 seconds left. It was the Eagles' fourth 
straight victory over Notre Dame, and the last time the teams 

I will meet until 2007. Down 20-7 at halftime, BC came back 
with a vengeance as Peterson threw for 297 yards in the final 
two quarters. Tony Gonzalez caught a 30-yard pass to seal 
the win for the Eagles in the fourth quarter. Interceptions by 
Jazzmen Williams and Dejuan Tribble kept the Eagles in the 



I 



game after tailing behind early, and the defense held strong 
allowing only three points in the second half. Peterson was 
named BIG EAST Offensive Player of the week for the second 
time this season, but this time as a solo recipient of the honor. 
Wins over Rutgers, West Virginia, and Temple followed. Brian 
Toal was named BIG EAST Co-Defensive Player of the Week 
with 15 tackles in the victory over Rutgers. Mathias Kiwanuka 
was named BIG EAST Defensive Player of the Week after seven 
tackles and two interceptions and Will Blackmon was named BIG 
EAST Special Teams Player of the Week after returning kicks 
for 132 yards and a touchdown in the win over West Virginia. 
L.V. Whitworth was named BIG EAST Offensive Player of, 
the Week after rushing for 151 yards and two touchdowns and' 
Ray Henderson was named BIG EAST Defensive Player of| 
the Week for the second time during the season after having| 
15 tackles and one interception in the win over Temple 
The seasoii ended with a loss to Syracuse without senior ^^ 
quarterback Paul Peterson. Freshman quarterback Matt Ryarv|B 
passed for 200 yards and a touchdown to Joel Hazard iii the 
loss. Brian Toal blocked a punt that was recovered by Dejuan 
Tribble for a touchdown to give the Eagles some offense. 
Post-season awards went to Freshman linebacker Brian,^ 
Toal named the BIG EAST Rookie of the Year and Juniorl 
defensive end Mathias Kiwanuka was named Defensive 
Player of the Year, the first BC player ever to receive this 
honor. Kiwanuka was also named to the BIG EAST firscil 
team, while Grant Adams, Patrick Ross, Jeremy Tmeblood, 
David Kashetta, Will Blackmon, Tim Bulman, Ray 
Henderson, and TJ. Stancil were named to the second team. 
The team finished the season with a big 37-24 win overl 
North Carolina in the Continental Tire Bowl, despite loosingl 
Peterson in the fourth quarter to a broken left leg. The Eagles 1 
finished their last season in the BIG EAST with a sharing ofj 
the championship title with Pittsburgh, Syracuse, and West! 
Virginia. It was their first time winning the BIG EAST] 
title, and a great way to leave the BIG EAST. The teaial 
looks forward to tough competition next year in the ACC-i 



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A-hove: BC and UConn players anxiously awit the end ot play to see whether BC schored another touchedown in their eventual win. Below Far Left: The action continues as BC goes in for 
:he touchdown. .Below Left: Both BC and UConn players jump into action after the snap. Below Right: Wide Reciever Grant Adams reaches for a long pass from Quaterback Paul Peterson. 






*^' 



^■ 



E5s>s-« T- 











Photos Courtesy of Heather Page 



Spnrrs 



T97 



FOOTBALL 

Saturday Night Lights 





Above: The BC UcIl-iux: iincs up al llic line ul ><.riiiiiiid)4L- lo slop llic UCunn 
offense. Right: Peter Shean prepares to defend against a UConn offensive drive. 
Photos by Hemher Pagf 





Ill ' I [ 1 (_ iiL I II jku lUc Jru'c tor a luit Juwn. Phuiu by I IcLithcr l\ij^i 



FOOTBALL 

Tackling Success 



I 




P ; iro to rcccr. 

Photoi Courtesy of Marc Andrew DeleylDeUy Phoios 



LA'. Whilwiirth hrcMk> ;i l:ickl<; iiKiiinM Nulrc 



.ill Bhickinun returns ,i kick 



CHEERLEADING 

Spirit on the Sidelines 



"A good cheerleader is not mea- 
sured by the height of her jumps but 
the span of her spirit." 
" Anonymous 




BC cheerleaders do a cheer before a game. 



The LliLerleaders make a pyramid in the endzone 
folUovving a touchdown. 




Tlte team does a lift to slrow dieir spirit during a 
game. 





The cheerleaders carry flags as they run through the endzone following a touchdown. 
P/iotos Q,oum^^ of Heather Page 



The cheerleaders pump up the Superfans. 



S pnr r. s 201 



WOMEN'S SOCCER 

Not Passing Up Any Chances 



-he women's soccer team left the 2003 season with high 
hopes after posting a 13-2-2 record in the regular season 
and making it to the BIG EAST championships, where 
they lost in oxertime on penalty kicks. Team co-captains Laina 
Ceddia and Kate Taylor led the team to a regular season record 
oi 13-5, continuing the success of the women's team in 2004- 
The season began with a frustrating 1-0 loss to Boston Uiiiver- 
sity. The team then picked up where they left off last season, 
winning three straight, including two shutouts. After dropping 
the next three games, BC went on a streak of seven wins in 
a row. This restored confidence that had been suffering after 
several close losses, including a 1-0 loss to Villanova, who 
had beaten them in the BIG EAST championship in 200j. 

i' over Georgetown in the BIG 
EAST tournament, BC lost to Notre Dame 2-0 in the semi- 
finals, an earlier exit than hoped for. However, after this 
disappointment, the team focused their attention on the 
NCAA tournament after they won a bid, finishing the season 
ranked number 19. The Eagles look to continue this success 
and look fonvard to future bids in the NCAA tournament. 
The BC women's soccer team earned many honors during 
the 2004 season. Both Tara Luciani and Kia McNeill were 
named Rookie ot the Week during the 2004 season. Jentiy 
Maurer was named Detensi\e Player of the Week, as well as 
a member of the Verizon/CoSIDA Academic All-America 
Women's Soccer District 1 Team, along with Heather 
Ferron. McNeill was also named Co-Rookie of the Year and 
All-BIG EAST First Teani. Maurer, Ceddia, and Lindsey 
McArdle were named to the All-BIG EAST Second Team. 




n 



im 



>/*'-■' 




\bo\'e; JiUian Raybould fights for control of the ball v\'ith a player trom Pro\-idence College. Below Far Lett: Mary Schneck controls the ball as BC battles Providence College. 
3elow Lett: Katie Coffey clears the ball away from the goal area. Below Right: Katie Coffey looks for an open teammate during a throw-in. 




Spnrr.s 



After posting a 6-7-4 record last 
season, the men's soccer team 
was determined to improve. 
Senior co-captains Pat Haggerty, Bill 
Arnault, and Guy Melamed have led 
the young team as they have improved 
throughout the season. Sophomore 
goalkeeper Issey Maholo and 1 1 freshmen 
have helped the Eagles gain recognition 
throughout the season. They began 
the year with a 3-1 win over Brown, a 
promising sign for the rest of the season. 
After getting ahead 1-0 on a goal from 
freshman Charlie Davies, Brown tied the 
score, hut the Eagles retook the lead and 
sealed the victory with two goals in the 
last 13 minutes of the game. The Eagles 
went on to win their first four games of 
the season and earned a national ranking. 
Charlie Davies was named Big East rookie 
of the week and Issey Maholo was named 
conference goalkeeper of the week after 
the first week of action. The team finished 
the regular season with a 12-3-2 record, 
with only one loss and no ties occurring at 
home. Issey Maholo recorded 9 shutouts 
and senior co-captain Pat Haggerty was 
named to the College Soccer News Team 
of the Week twice during the season. The 
young team looks forward to continuing 



MEN'S SOCCER 

- Rebuilding for Success- 




Top left: Sophomore back Richard Gavilanes clears the ball from the goal area. Top right: Goalkeeper Issey Maholo 
makes a jumping save. Above: Jamen Amato looks for an open teammate. Photos by Chris Brcwwi 




^9 



The team plays under the lights on the Newton field. Photo by Chris Broun 



Senior ciiplain Bill Arniiiili looks tor a shot on goal. Photo 
by Chri.s Broivii 




Top left; Senior captain Guy Melamed fights a defender for possession of tlie ball. Top right; A player dribbles the ball down the iU 
more midfielder jamen Amato beats the opposing team to the ball and sends it away from the goal. Photos bv Chrh Brown 



Sports 205 



MEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 

Making Strides to Victory 



Beginning their season at the UNH 
Wildcat Invitational Sept. 11, the 
men's cross country team got off to 
a slower start than they were hoping for. 
Finishing seventh in that first meet, the 
Eagles began to gain momentum as the 
season progressed. A fifth place finish at 
the lona College Meet of Champions in 
New York, thanks largely in part to Captain 
Drew Bouchard's placing 17''\ prepared the 
team for their first meet at home. The New 
England Championships, run in Boston, was 
a great success for the team, led once again by 
Bouchard who finished seventh. The team 
as a whole also did well in their first home 
meet with all five of the BC runners placing 
in the top 65 of a field of 3 1 5. Bouchard 
and his co-captain Trevor Rozier-Byrd, 
both seniors, led the team to a successful 
year. Their strong finishes paired with head 
coach Randy Thomas' experience honed 
over seven seasons as program director, laid 
an excellent foundation for the men's cross 
country- season. After finishing tenth at the 
national championships at Penn State, the 
team looked to finish out the season strongly. 
They then proceeded to finish eighth overall 
in the BIG EAST championships, led by 
freshman Adam Moitoso, who finished 31st 
overall, and three others finished in the top 
5Q. With twelve freshmen on the team, 
the men's cross-country' team has a positive 
outlook as they look to continue this success 
in future seasons. 




The men's cross country team lines up at the starting line at the beginning of a race, /'hoio (n McQrath Siudii 



A BC runncT fights to finish a race. Photo by McQrae/i 
Studios 



WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 

On Pace for Bright Future — 



The women's cross country team started 
their season strong this fall. They 
placed sixth at the University of New 
Hampshire Wildcat Invitational and saw a 
promising start from their incoming class, as 
freshman Lynn Kubeja was the Eagle's top 
runner in that meet. The team then had a 
strong showing at the lona College Meet of 
Champions in New York, where they placed 
third. Maria Cicero, a sophomore, finished 
eighth and Laura Burdick and Jess Flinn 
also posted good times to secure BC a high 
finish. A second place finish at the Murray 
Keeting Invitational and Cicero's third place 
finish showed the team's strength. BC had 
five finishers-more than any other school- 
in the top 50. Head Coach Randy Thomas, 
who brings his skills to both the men and 
women's programs, capped off his 13 th year 
at Boston College with this season. For the 
first season, assistant coach John Mortimer 
and volunteer Amy Mortimer added to the 
beaching staff. Finally, the girls were led in 
part by assistant coach Erin O'Reilly. The 
women's team finished fourth overall at the 
National Invitational held at Penn State. 
They then finished sixth overall at the BIG 
EAST championships. Senior Maria Cicero 
finished ninth overall to lead the team. Five 
other BC runners finished in the top 50 as 
well. The team saw great success throughout 
the season and looked forward to seeing how 
well the potential ot its new additions would 
contribute to the overall placing of the team. 





■ 1 1 in^x-ts With a runner prior to a race. P/iuiu t)j 
McQrath Studios 



A BC runner ti^^hts for position against an opposing 
runner. Photo bv McQrath Studios 



The women's team starts oft a race. 
Photo b> McQrath Studios 



Sporrs ffl^ 



CROSS COUNTRY 

Racing to the Top 



i 




Top: BC runners round i corner during a meet. Above: The men's team pushes to the head of the pack early on in Alexis Lake slows down after completing a race. Photo 
a meet. Photos tn' McQrath Studios tn' McQrath Studios 




I 
I 



The wumcn's cc<im ct^iargcs a^iciiJ ut uppusing achuuU during a raLc. Pimtus fn WciJTuth Studins 



A BC runner o-invciiti.iiL.s .i.-> lie [Hj>ltc^ lum^clt during .1 
mcut. Photo by McQrath Studios 



^ I 




Top: A runner stretches as she prepares tor a meet. Above: A member of the men's team charges to the finish. 
Pfiotos by McQrath Studios 



cs icht.tt beii 'IT .1 r;M.^'. j/iacoby 



McQrath Studios 



SpniTs 209 



FIELD HOCKEY 

Sticking it to the Opposition 



^ he women's field hockey team began the 2004 

^^ I season with high hopes after posting a 15-7 mark 

JL. during the 2003 season, as well as being the BIG 

LA.ST champions. Captains Kerri Doherty, Bronwen Kelly, 

and Lauren Schultz led the team with 10 returning starters 

and only three starters lost to graduation. Preseason polls 

'r reported that the team was a likely contender to be BIG 
EAST champion again. 
After a disappointing start in a heartbreaking loss ot the first 

i game of the season to Maryland spurred to team to push 
for success. After jumping out to a 1-0 lead in the first 

, period, Maryland tied the Eagles, and eventually netted the 

y winning goal in overtime. Following the 3-2 loss, the Eagles 
concentrated on their next opponent, UMass, and recorded 
their first victory of the season, a 3-1 win. This win restored 
confidence in the team as they looked forward to the rest of 
the season. Only three regular season losses occurred after 
the initial one to Maryland, and the team was propelled into 
the BIG EAST tournament. 
The team finished the regular season ranked number 1 1 in 

i^the nation with a record of 16-4. After defeating Syracuse 
in the BIG EAST tournament semifinals, the defending 
champions lost to top ranked Connecticut, the team they 
had beaten in 2003 to win the tournament, in the BIG 
EAST Championships. Kerri Doherty, Bronwen Kelly, 
Sabrina Lazzari, and Kristen Madden were all named to 
the BIG EAST field hockey first team, and Jillian Savoy 
and Sara York were both named to the second team. The 
team also won a hid to the NCAA tournament for the 
second year in a row. The Eagles, though no longer the BIG 
EAST champions, had a successful season, and look to have 

r continued success in field hockey. 




Memliers of tile field hockey team celebrate a victor^!. Phoio Courtesy of FiM Hockey TL'nv\ 




■lebratcs a goal. Right: Sara York .inJ Kctn 1 J.ilicriy kivc ckI 



.1 mjal, /'/lulos Cijurlcs> <;/FicU / IhJ.i . L\iu\ 




Above Lett: Lauren Schultz awaits a pass from a teammate. Above Right: Bronwen Kelly passes the ball up the field Below Left Kerri DohertylooLs tor an open shot. Below Center: Bronwen 
Kelly prepares to block an advancing opponent. Below Right: Crystal Frates clears the ball awav from the goal Phiirn\ Cnuitt^sy nf FielJ H()(.Le^ T tarn 




Spnrf.-; 



MEN^S SWIMMING AND DIVING 



Successful Strokes 



Although considered td'he'a'wirifer 
men's swimming and diving season began in 
October and were active with meets up unti 
February. Following the end of the regular season, 
BIG EAST Championships, ECAC Championships, 
and NCAA Championships extend the swimming 
and diving season through March. Head coach Tom 
Groden led the team to another successful season. 
David Herman and Brandon Twichell, the 2004- 
2005 captains also provided excellent leadership. 
The team lost their home opener against Fordham 
this year but went on to win numerous other meets. 
They beat Rhode Island 178-113, when Tim Tully 
won three individual events for the Eagles. The team 
topped Providence College, winning 11 out of 16 
events. The Eagles also beat Tufts with a 190-146 
victory. In that meet, Thomas Martz was named the 
meet's outstanding performer and diver Christopher 
Wilson-Byrne won the won one meter and three 
meter dives to earn the most outstanding performance 
award. The men also performed well at Yale's 
Nutmeg Invitational, where they won four events 
and Tully was named outstanding performer. After a 
disappointing meet against Massachusetts, their third 
loss of the season, the Eagles struck back with wins 
against Maine and Holy Cross, wining 184-136 and 
178-81, respectively. At the Big East Championships, 
the Eagles swam strong to an eighth place finish. 
Thieir biggest success was with Tully, Twichell, David 
Herman, and Billy Schwitter taking eighth place in 
the 400 freestyle relay. 




Christopher Wilson-Byrne shows great form during a 
Photo Courtesy of the Men's Swimming Team 



dive. 




Tim Tully chunv> throuuh the pixjl Jurini; ;i race 
Photo Counay of ihe Men i Slumming Team 



BnnuKin Twichell lloL■^ the l'^l•,lsl^lr(lk^.■ Jiiiin 
Photo Courtesy of (Jie Men's Sivimming Team 



WOMEN^S SWIMMING AND DIVING 



Ruling the Pool 



The Women's Swimming and Diving team got 
off to a great start this year with a win over 
Colgate on October 16th by a score of 155- 
141. The team suffered a loss against New Hampshire, 
but came back to beat Fordham 167.5-132.5 earning 
their fourth win of the season. In that meet they 
won the 200 medley relay, the 100 backstroke, 200 
fly, and dominated the breaststroke as well. Divers 
Jennifer Rhines and Maeve Brennan went one and 
two, respectively, in both the one and three meter 
dives. The team beat Rhode Island in 1 1 of 16 events 
with impressive finishes by the swimmers. The diving 
team did especially well, as they garnered the top 
three places in both the one and three meter dives. 
The Eagles came back from a disappointing loss to 
Princeton to beat Central Connecticut State the same 
weekend. Junior Elizabeth Byron had a very successful 
day, winning two events in the Central Connecticut 
meet and setting a pool record in the 100 fly. The 
team won 7 events in the Nutmeg Invitational, which 
does not keep team scores. They also had big wins 
against the University of Massachusetts and Boston 
University. In a season to be proud of for head coach 
Tom Groden, diving coach Deanna Zechmann, 
and assistant coach Michael Pohorylo, the Big East 
Championships proved to be an excellent ending. 
The team took eighth place, with Byron continuing 
to dominate sprint freestyle events and sophomore 
Carolyn Bowman delivering BC's top individual 
performance, placing fifth in the 200 breaststroke. 




A member of the women's team takes a breath between strokes. 
Photo Courtesy ofMarc Andrew DeleylDeley Photos 




A swimmer cheers un her teammate during a race. 
Photo Courtesy of Marc Anclreu; DeleylDeley Photos 



Katherine Saylor charges during a treestyle race. 
Photo Courtesy of the Women's Swimming Team 



Spor ts 



Basketball 

Laying the Foundation for a Dynasty 




Left: Louii Hinnant brings the h.i 



Right: The team gathers during a timeout. Phtjtos Courtesy ofMyra Chai 




Left: Jared Dudley protects the hall ftom a ViUanova defender. Right: Jared Dudley prepares for a free throw. Photos Courtesy ofMyra Chai 



Spnrr.s I 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 

Shooting stars 



A' 



fter struggling to break into the top 2 5 las^eason^he 
men's basketball team was determined to improve. 
.Preseason polls predicted the Eagles to finish fifth 
in the BIG EAST and junior Craig Smith was named to the 
preseason AU-BIG EAST First Team. The men's basketball 
team erased any doubt in their determination to win early 
in the season. A 16-0 record to begin the season showed 
that the Eagles were serious contenders. Led by captains 
senior Nate Doomekamp, junior Louis Hinnant, and Smith, 
not only did they break the top 25, the Eagles improved to 
eighth and made themselves one of only three undefeated 
teams.The Eagles played cleanly and were able to win many 
close games. An overtime victory over Holy Cross, a double 
overtime victory over Yale, and last minute wins over Kent 
State and Villanova helped maintain their impressive record. 
Smith and Jared Dudley provided a spark on the offense. In 
particular. Smith's last minute jumper over Kent State and 
Dudley's three point play in the last five seconds to defeat 
Villanova proved to be victorious moments. As evidence of 
the team's great season, Smith was named Sporting News 
National Player of the Week and BIG EAST Co-Player of 
the Week. Jared Dudley was named BIG EAST Player of 
the Week, BIG EAST Co-Player of the Week, and Sporting 
News National Player of the Week. Sean Williams was 
named BIG EAST Freshman of the Week. After a tough 
game, the Eagle's sustained their first loss of the season 
68-65 against Notre Dame. The disappointment, however, 
wouldn't trip up the team on its way to continued victory. 
Soon after, the team toppled Rutgers and took on Syracuse 
for a thrilling 65-60 win.The team hoped to continue its 
winning ways throughout the season end and into the BIG 
EAST Championships and NCAA tournament. 




Nate Doomekamp looks for a teammate to inbound the ball to. Photo By Myra Cfiai 




Craii; dmith sHoom over a defender. 



Jared Dudley looks for an open teammate or shot. 
P/ioio By Myra C/uii 



•-« !* 



.^>.-» 












rtM 



r^. 



1"!^ 






Above: The team gathers around Coach Skinner to discuss a play. Below Left: Sean Marshall brings the ball up the court and looks to make a play. Below Right: Nate Doornekam and Louis 
Hinnant confer during a break in the game. Phntos B;v Myra Chai 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 

— Soaring on top of the BIG EAST — 



H^l^^oming into the 2004-2005 season, the women's basketball 

■ I team had high hopes with good reason. In 2004, the team 

m V_^ soared to a record of 27-7, with the most wins in BC women's 

basketball history. Winning the BIG EAST Championship and a trip 

to the NCAA Sweet Sixteen set expectations high. The 2004-2005 

Rseason would feature 10 returning team members and 3 returning 

starters. Preseason polls ranked the team from 7''^ to 22"*', and also 

t named sophomore Kathrin Ress and senior co-captain Jessalyn Deveny 
as preseason All-Americans and candidates for the Naismith Trophy. 
The season had the team open with a record of 14-2 and ranked 14* 
in the nation. A decisive 71-50 victory over Westeni Michigan was 
followed up by a heartbreaking overtime 82-78 loss to Michigan 
State. The team then won the next 1 1 games, maiiy of which were 
blowouts. The streak was snapped by perennial powerhouse Stanford, 
hut the Eagles bouriced back with two straight wins. A 5-0 record 
in the BIG EAST helped high expectations of a second BIG EAST 
Championship in two years. Deveny, Brooke Queenan, arid Ress led 
the Eagles in scoring with shooting percentages of .560. .525, and .572, 
respectively, and senior co-captaiiis Deveny and Clare Droesch led the 
team in rebounding. The team overall impressively averaged about 
;20 points higher and 8 rebounds more per game than their opponents. 
Several members of the team were honored by the BIG EAST: Deveny 
was named BIG EAST Co-Player of the Week twice and Player of 
the Week once, as well as being named to the Academic All-District 
squad, while Shamika Jackson was named BIG EAST Freshman of the 
Week. Coach Cathy Inglese also won her 200''' game as coach of BC 
early in the season. Tlie Eagle's headed into the last part of their season 
bumpily, with losses to St. John's and Connecticut, a 75-50 victoi'y 
over Syracuse, a disappointing loss to Notre Dame, and a triumphaiit 
win, 71-44, over Seton Hall. The women's basketball team started the 
2004-2005 seasoii strongly aiid hoped see a return to the BIG EAST 
Championship and NCAA tournament. 




Jessalyn Deveny slioots over an opponent while Baldwin cheers the team on. 

Phnbi CourU'iy n[ Lisa Caicio 




The team gathers around Coach inglcsc to plan the 
next play during a time-out. 
Photo Coimesj of Lua Cascio 



Coach Inglcse yells a play tor the team to run 
Phouj CnuTUsy of Lisa Cascio 



Clare Droesch looks for an open teammate during a game. 
Photo Courtesy of Lisa Cascio 




Lisa Macchia shoots over an opponent. Photo Courtesy of Marc Deky/Deley Phocoi 



Sarah Marshall brings the ball up the court 
Photo Courtesy of Marc Deley/Deley Photos 

Spnrrs 



I 



MEN'S HOCKEY 

— Setting High Goals — 



The Boston College hockey team was con- 
sistently one of the top in the country this 
season. After finishing the 2003-2004 
year with a record of 29-9-4 and winning the 
league, the Eagles continued their success this 
season. The Team, under the leadership of head 
coach Jerry York, started out the season with 
wins in their first games against New Brunswick 
and Denver, the defending National Champions. 
Boston College dropped their first game against 
Boston University this year, however they came 
back to clench the series with two big wins over 
BU later in the season. In the first game, a 6-3 
win in front of a sell-out crowd at Kelly Rink, 
Patrick Eaves scored two goals for the Eagles 
while three other players each added a goal. 
T~he next night Boston College dealt the Terri- 
ers another loss in their first game at their brand 
new facility, Agganis Rink. The team earned 
many accolades this season. Patrick Eaves was 
Hockey East Player of the Week. Mike Brennan 
earned Hockey East Superskills Rookie of the 
Week Honors following his superb performance 
in the sweep over Merrimack early in the season. 
The Eagles tallied their ninth straight win when 
they defeated Northeastern 4-2 at home on Janu- 
ary 2 1 . TTie team was ranked second nationally. 




Ryan Shannon chases after a puck that was cleared out of the BC goal area as goalie Cory Schneider 
looks on. Photo Courtesy of Marc Andrew Deky/Deley Photos 




Mike Brennan fighu for control in front of the crease. 
Phfito CourUiy of Marc Andrew DeleylDcley Phoioi 



be pl;iycrs enter the circle liir a tace-ott. 

Phiitii C.iiurusy iifMarc Andrew Dclc\IDflf\ Photoi 






W^v.i'-M 




A.bove: Ryan Shannon moves the puck up the ice with teammate Patrick Eaves. Below Left: Mike Brennan controls the puck through centet ice. Below Right: Brian O'Hanley passes to a 
teammate as BC advances towards the opponent's goal. Photos Courtesy of Marc Andrew Deley/Deley Photos 




Spni-r.s 



MEN'S HOCKEY 

- Icing the Competition - 




Photos cmmeij of Marc Andrew DeleylDeleyPhoios 




\bove: Defensemen Mike Brennan hustles to clear the puck away from the goal. 



Above: Captain Ryan Shannon chases a loose puck during a game against New Brunswick. 



Sporr.s ^^ 



WOMEN'S HOCKEY 

Steady Improvement 



llio Boston College Women's Hockey team 
this year was made up ot 12 returners an J 10 
new players who were all kxikinu; to imprin'e 
on last year's 1-18- 1 conference record. The team 
t^ot oft to a rou.yh start this season but continued to 
make pro_yress throiit^hout the winter. Head coach 
Tom Mutch led the Eagles tor his second season. 
This year the team was also led hy co-captains 
Sarah Carlson and Kerri Sanders. C^arlson anchored 
the defense with suppiMt coming from returning 
players Jill Mclnnis and Jessica WilsiMi. Sanders 
was jt-iincd on offense hy seniors Lindsey Bazzone, 
Heidi Sidewind, as well as two juniors and se\etal 
pmmising underclassmaii. Three goalies split time 
in net; .\lison Quandt, who was named Hockey East 
Defender ot the Week twice, Davis, and Moynihati. 
While facing a rocky record, the team headed into 
the Beanpot with confidence that paid off. While 
exentiially losing to Har\ard in the tournament, 
the Eagle's ad\anced strongly in to the final. The 
team was looking forward to finishing out the season 
with match ups against Maine and New Hampshire 
and had hope of a strong finish in the Hockey East 
Tournament. The Eagles', after a season of ups 
anil tlowns, looked to continued impro\ement in 
next .season, with hope to build on this .sea.son's 
accomplishments. 






Arm' ^ 




k* li?' K ^ 



The team cck-hrnr^ .i vitii.r 
PhoUJ Cfnirvuy of Spom Mariuim;; 



]V. '. lines upon tlie hliie line a.s rlie n:itiiin;il iiiiln m i [ 
I'hoio Cimriesy of Sporu Markciing 



STOWWf^jljJjJJW;'*' 






Lisa Davis stands in position waiting for a shot. 
Photo Courtesy of Lisa Davis 



Sarah Carlson skates up the ice while watching the play in front of her. 
Photo Courtesy of Sports Marketing 



^SSSBsfa^ 




Above: Deborah Spillane takes a face-off as Kern SanJeis and .mother BC forward look to get the puek. I'huio Cuurtesy of Sports Marketing 



.Sports ^g 



The women's volleyball team started off the 
season with all ot their returning talent. 
The team lost no starters or letter winners 
from the previous season, despite having only 
two seniors. The team was under the direction 
of Head Coach Andrea Leonard and assistant 
coaches Melissa Alpers and Kin Yun. The Eagles 
started out the season with a huge win over Notre 
Dame in South Bend. They then went on to shut 
out the University of Connecticut in the Power 
Gym. Another win over St. John's ensured the 
team a spot in the Big East tournament for the 
first time in 1 1 years. Unfortunately, the team 
fell to Notre Dame in the semifinals with a score 
of 3-1. Overall, it was an excellent season for the 
BC Volleyball team. There were many individual 
honors. Allison Anderson garnered Big East 
Libero of the Year honors. Katie Andersen earned 
All-Conference second team honors and Verena 
Rost received All Big East Honorable Mention. 
The team finished with a 20-12 record, which 
was the first time in the history of the program 
that the 20 win mark had ever been reached. 



VOLLEYBALL 

- Setting the Future - 




Allison Anderson and another BC player jump above the net to block a hit. 
Photo Courtesy of the Volleyball Team 





Emily Sccgner bump^ the bail to a te;itiiiii 
Phoio Cotmesy of ihe Volleyball Team 



l.i: An.] I i.i^scs the h.ill in ihe .iir i- 1. 
Phuiu Couruiy of ihe Volkyhall Teum 




■^' ' ""^Vj'^. 






^■J^'^^d^-^*^-"^ 



Top left: Katie Andersen, Abigail Hasebroock, and Verena Rost soar as they block a hit over the net. Top right: A mcmher ol' the icmki ^yi 
^.- .- on and the other team tries to block her. Above: The team pose.s for a picture after a x'ictory. Photos Coimesy of Katie Anikr^cn 



.Spnrrs 227 



The Men's Fencing team opened 
their season this fall at the NEIFC/ 
NEWIFA Fall Invitational. The 
team was led by sophomore Alex Rios in the 
opener, who finished third in the men's epee. 
It was a solid start for the first meet of the 
year, as the eagles had six of their competitors 
make the finals. The team was led by senior 
captains Steve Koza and Will Lawrie. On 
December 5, the Eagle's faced Brandeis, MIT, 
St. John's, Vassar, and Brown. Taking some 
disappointing losses, the Eagle's barely missed 
a tie against Brown, who defeated them 14-13 
and took a refreshing win against Vassar 20- 
7. The Eagle's again faced Brandeis, MIT, and 
Brown, with additional opponent Dartmouth, 
in NFC action on January 29. The Eagle's 
dropped to Brandeis, MIT and Brown. 
The team pulled out a tight win against 
Dartmouth, 14-13. Best on the day, the 
team's epee squad went 8-1 against Brown, 
5-4 against Dartmouth, and 6-3 against MIT. 
That weekend, Will Lawrie and Sean Hickey 
had great personal successes, winning 50 
percent of their bouts. The Eagle's finished 
their dual meet season strongly, sweeping 
Tufts 20-7, Massachusetts 14-13, BU 19-8, 
and New Hampshire 25-2 in its February 12 
meet at Tufts. The team finished its season 5 -3 . 



MEN'S FENCING 

— Foiling opponents — 





Lcli. 'ii.';!! L^'.^ric rci.c'ivi:o j iiicJui a^ lie rt.'pri;-'K;iii^ BC til a iii.ilcli. Cciucr: I'.il Ciiilcy gel.', in die \in U<irJc puailiuii. Riglil: Will Uiwrie rai^ci lu.s lull in |>ii.|i.ii.uuiii lor iHl' bcgiiininK i 
a Kjui. Left and Center PhijinCtniTtesy of A. Fauhel, Right PhiJio Counesy uf Will Lawrk 



WOMEN'S FENCING 

— Showing Off their Forte — 



The Women's Fencing team came 
off a fourth place finish in the 2004 
Championships last season. They 
began this season at the NEIFC/NEWIFA 
Fall Invitational. Tiffany White was the 
top Eagle with a third place finish in the 
Women's epee. The Eagles were led by 
senior co-captains Genevieve Peeples and 
Tiffany White, who both competed in the 
epee. December 4 the Eagles faced five teams 
at Brandeis University. The team dropped 
to Brandeis 14-13, MIT 18-9, and St. John's 
16-11. They took Vassar and Brown, 20-7 
and 14-13, respectively. Though the meet 
was a bit of a disappointment. White won a 
remarkable 14 ot her 15 bouts in an amazing 
show of skill. On January 29, the team racked 
up four Northeast Conference wins at Brown, 
defeating Smith, Brandeis, Brown, and 
Dartmouth. White again had an impressive 
showing, winning 11 of her 12 bouts. Over 
the weekend of February 5, the team saw a 
disappointing series of losses against NYU, 
University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard but 
came back to beat UNC 16-11. Finishing off 
the dual meet season, the Eagles competed 
February 12 defeating five teams on the day. 
BC beat Tufts, UMass, BU, Wellesley, and 
New Hampshire, leaving them confident 
headed in to the post-season tournament. 





Tiffany \X'hitL .KK'tinces towards an opponent. 
Photo Courtesy of A . Faubel 



Two members of the women's fencing team practice Pefore 
a match. Photo Courtesy of A. Faubel 



Spnrrs 



SKIING 

Gliding to Victory 



^^^iffe Ski Team opened the season 
I under the leadership of brand new 
JL Head Coach Kristian Knights, 
i 2004 graduate of Colby College. Last 
season the Men finished in 11th place 
3verall in the USCSA Nationals, held 
in Sugarloaf, Maine. Greg Avallon and 
Dave Giuletti were named to the AH- 
l^merica Men's Giant Slalom second 
:eam. The Women finished off the 
.eason with a second place finish at both 
regionals and the USCSA Nationals. 
rhey were honored to have three team 
members; Kara Hoisington, Erica Pylman, 
md Jeruiifer Ruco named to the All- 
\merica Women's Individual Combined 
second Team, the All America Women's 
3iant Slalom Second Team, and the 
A.11 America Women's Slalom Second 
Team. Avallon returned to the men's 
:eam this 2005 season as a sophomore 
md Hoisington returned to the women's 
:eam as a sophomore. The men started at 
Massachusetts/ Amherst Carnival. They 
inished fourth in the giant slalom, led 
jy Avallon and Andrew Wallman, who 
"inished seventh and twelfth. The team 
:ame in fifth in the slalom. The women's 
:eam, also a young team with only three 
jf their eleven skiers upperclassmen, 
jpened the season at the same Caniival 
^•ith a third place finish in the slalom 



and a sixth place outcome in the giant 
slalom. Hoisington led the Eagles 
both events with a fifth place finish in 
the giant slalom and a sixth place finish 
in the slalom. Other top ten finishers 
were Molly McCary and Courtiiey 
Culnane. At the end of January, the 
team faced opposition from Plymouth 
State, Massachusetts, aiui Colby/Sawyer. 
Avallon finished in fourth-place in the 
giant slalom arid sophomore Thatcher 
Merrill finished 10''' in the giant slalom 
and 13''' in the slalom. The women 
had quite a few skiers place as well. 
Hoisington finished in seventh-place 
in the slalom and sophomore Courtney 
Culnane finished eighth in the giant 
slalom. Feb. 5 the meii's team finished 
fourth in the slalom in the MIT Carnival 
with strong showings from Merrill and 
Wallmaii. The Brown Carnival was a 
good showing for the women's team, 
with four members finishing in the top 
15 and the team winning the giant 
slalom. At the Boston College Carnival, 
Avallon had EC's best individual race of 
the season for the men and became the 
first Eagle to take an event in the 2005 
season. The women woii the slalom with 
Culnane and Hoisington again leading 
the women's finishers. 




^fm^^tk 


9 






r^HP^^Hk ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


^ 

^ 




1 







Above: A racer at an EISA event. Right; N4emhers of the ski tean 
pose ar the bottom ot a mountain after a race. 
Pficitos Cniirtesv oj the Ski Team and Eric Newman 




U..... 



uiii. 1. 1^1.1. ,\ I/.., I. Ill L-wllctii: I..ik1i- uIkIcs Jiiuii .c juuujii.iin. l'hutii-\ i.,.<uili-;, uj the Ski laim 




Left: Members of the ski tram smile after receiving awards. Right: A member ot tlie ski team makes a sharp turn around a gate. 
Photos Courtesy of Eric Newman and the Ski Team 



Spnrrs 



SOFTBALL 

Fielding All Challenges 



'he women's softball team finished the 2004 
season with a record of 33-25 overall and 
. 11-9 in the BIG EAST. Preseason polls 
for the 2005 season predicted a fourth place finish 
for the Eagles, the same as their final place in 
2004. The Eagles return 7 starters from the 2004 
season among 10 total returning team members. 
While the 2005 team saw little change from 
2004, the coaching staff underwent some major 
changes. New assistant coaches Cori Van Dusen 
and Brian Macchi will bring some new direction 
to the team under the guidance of returning head 
coach Jen Finley. A former pitcher for Providence 
College, Van Dusen replaced Stephanie Fleischaker, 
who had been with the team for five years. 
Macchi, a former member of the Boston College 
baseball team, will be the new hitting coach. 
In 2004, several members of the team earned honors. 
Sophomores Jenna Macchi and Britney Thompson 
were named BIG EAST players of the week. Graduate 
Tekae Malandris was named BIG EAST and ECAC 
pitcher of the week. Thompson and Malandris 
both were named to the AU-BIG EAST third team. 
The Eagles hope for another successful season in 2005 . 




Ill) Council at Mkhctic D 




KriMJn Allaiii I !■■( itij- ii, 
Photo Courtesy of Michelle Daly 



i'mkik'iic 1 ';ily prupitrc^ liir :i piuh .11 iik" pl.tu-. 
Phuui Courtesy of Michelle Daly 




Above: Michelle Daly delivers a pitch. Bottom Left: Seniors Michelle Ll.iU ,ukI Li^j 1 lelJ 
Courtesy of Michelle Daly, Lisa Field, and the Softball Team 



puM.- iMi ,1 piLUiic out of their uniforms. Bottom Right: Ashley Ohrest waits for a pitch. Photos 




Spnrr.s I 



ik 



The Eagles posted a 32-27 record 
and were fourth with a record 
of 15-9 in the BIG EAST m 
2004. Preseason polls predicted a fifth 
place BIG EAST finish for the 2005 
season. Senior Drew Locke was named 
to the 2005 Preseason BIG EAST 
first team. Last season, the baseball 
team lost to Notre Dame in the BIG 
EAST Championship by a score of 
11-5. Following the season, BC lost 
then-juniors Kevin Shepard and Ryan 
Leahy to the major leagues. For the 
2004 season, senior Jason Delaney and 
se^'eral graduated Eagles earned BIG 
EAST player of the week honors and 
6 Eagles earned BIG EAST postseason 
honors. Graduate Chris Lambert was 
named Co-Pitcher of the Year for the 
second time in his career. Delaney 
was also named to the BIG EAST 
first team. Ryan Leahy and Locke 
were named to the second team, with 
Kevin Shepard and graduate Garrett 
Greer named to the third team. After 
the success of last season, the Eagles 
hope to continue their winning ways 
at Shea Field and return to the BIG 
EAST Championship once again. 



BASEBALL 

Swinging for the Fences 

on? 




Jason Delaney swings as a pitch approaches the plate. Photo Cotirles)' of]ason Delaney 




I 



PhijUj Cuuritij ufjoiun Delaney 



r ly to fic-ld ;i hit h. 



us helmet nn .liter ,i ineclint; .il ihe pileh- 



iiig inuunJ. I'huiu Courieiy of}ason Delaney 




1 


ta- 





Above Lett: Vlike Wlodarczyk winds up. Above Right: Dave Preiiosi waits for a pitch. Below The team celebrates a victory. Photos Courtesy of Jason Delanej 





MEN'S TENNIS 

Acing the Competition 



To begin the tall 2004 season, the men's 
tennis team was in the ECAC Men's Tennis 
Invitational. A tough first round 5-2 loss to 
Princeton sent the team to the consolation bracket 
early in the tournament. They then lost to Stony 
Brook by a score of 5-2 and to St. Joseph's by a score 
ot 5-2. The team ended up finishing 15th in the 
tournament, providing a source of motivation for 
future tournaments. Soma Kesthely and Chris Louis 
both won two of three singles matches during the 
tournament. Senior co-captains Derrick Chou and 
Chris McCoy and freshman Artom Bogdanovich 
reached the ITA Championship to finish the fall 
season. McCoy won his first match, but failed to 
qualif\' for the main tournament. Chou won entry 
into the main tournament and won in his first 
round match, but was defeated in the second round. 
Bogdanovich was in the main tournament and won 
his first round match before falling in the second 
round. A disappointing fall season served as a good 
building point for the team during the winter. The 
team dropped the first match of the spring season 
to Brown University, and later fell to URI and 
Clemson as well. A loss to Dartmouth 6-1 was the 
Eagles second loss in as many days. Although the 
men's tennis team had a rough start to the 2005 
spring season, they hoped to see an improvement 
as the young team adjusted to the competition. 




The 2004-2005 men's tennis team. Photo Courtesy of Sports Marketing 



Derrick Chou uses his powerful forehand. 
Phriiii Courtesy of Slniris Marketing 



Gc-olf Mueller returns a tou(;h hackhanii. 
PhoUi Courtesy of S/)or[s Mur/a'tiiig 



WOMEN'S TENNIS 

Volleying to the Top 



The women's tennis team began the 
2004 season in an impressive way. 
In Fhght A singles, Szilvia Szegedi, 
ranked 84th in the country, won her matches 
against the 68th, 73rd, and 100th ranked 
players in the country. Emily Yeomans won 
her Flight D first round singles match as well. 
Gia Nafarette won two of her Flight C singles 
matches. Szegedi and Nida Waseem made 
it to the third round of the Flight A doubles 
competition, finishing the tournament 2- 
2. At the USTA Women's College Temiis 
Invitational, Nida Waseem went 2-1 in singles 
matches. Waseem and Szegedi also won two 
doubles matches. Lindsey Nash returned from 
injury and played in the doubles tournament 
with Nagarette, also winning two matches. 
In the final tournament of the fall season, the 
ITA Championship, Morgan Landes went 3-1 
in singles play, losing in the second round ot 
the main tournament. After starting the spring 
season off with several losses, ii"icluding those 
to Oregon and Minnesota. Coming back, the 
Eagles defeated Cornell, hut was shut out by 
Notre Dame in their BIG EAST opener. Nash 
led the team to a 4-3 victory over Princeton. 
A loss to Dartmouth, 5-2, ended the Eagles 
nine-game winning streak against Ivy League 
teams. While off to a rocky start in the spring, 
the women's tennis team hoped to come back 
strong and finish the 2005 season with victory. 





mi JO c^ fi 1 ) picture before a rriatch. Photo Courtesy of Nida Waseem 



W///////// 



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LmJicy Na.sli rcLiirii^ a loiclumJ iliut ^luring a iiiaiLli. 
Photo Courtesy of Sports Marketing 



Sfuior Emily VLXuuans raccb tuvvarJ.s the uuL lu ixunn liie 
hall. P/ioto Courtesy oj'iport^ Marfcering 



Caitlin Arnould returns a powerful volley against her opponent. 
?koto Coumsy of Sports Marketing 



.Spnrrs 237 



WOMEN'S LACROSSE 

- Sticking it to the Competition - 



TKlowing a 2004 season that saw the team finish 
6-11, the women's lacrosse team hoped for a new 
beginning in 2005. Ending up on the short side 
of many close games provided motivation for the team. 
■ The Eagles spent time during the winter playing in a 
" tournament in Australia in preparation for the season. 
During the 2004 season, Jackie Yovankin was named 
BIG EAST Defensive Player of the Week. Senior Carley 
m St. Lucia was named to the AU-BIG EAST first team 
and senior Suzie Breaznell was named to the second 
team. St. Lucia also was awarded the Athletic Director's 
Award for Academic Achievement and was named to 
the IWCLA Division I North All-Region second team. 
The women's lacrosse team hoped to see 
improvement in the 2005 season as the young 
team continued to develop and work together. 





Above? Seniors Carley St. Lucia, Susie Breaznell, Courtney Legath, and Jackie Yovankin aJmirc 
tKe breathtaking views in Australia during a tournament. Rijiht: BC defends their goal as an 
opponent advances towards it. 
Pfiotos Courtesy of Jackie Yovankin and the Women's Lacrosse Team 




n\ tc-iim cradles the ball a.s she moves up the field. Right: Several defenders block .1 -}<• 1 "n w ul /'/iijIo.s Cimrle\y n\ [he W'imienS luurrossc Tcimi 




Left: Members of the team chase an opponent as she moves up the field. Right: Tight defense is played against Notre Dame. Photos Courtesy of the Women's Lacrosse Team 



.Spnrrs 



239 



SAILING 

Leading the Fleet 



"^he Boston College sailing team had a great fall 
season. The team, led hy head coach Greg 

.. Wilkinson, participated in hoth coed and wom- 
en's sailing events. Quite possibly one of the hardest 
working groups at BC, the sailors usually practiced about 
20 hours a week, spent additional time in the weight 
room, and sent many boats to multiple regattas each 
weekend. The hard work paid off, as BC maintained 
national rankings throughout the fall. The coed team 
reached a peak ranking of second nationally. The Wom- 
en's team finished the season ranked fourth in the nation. 
A talented freshman class gave the already 
strong group of sailors a boost this season. ■ They won 
many freshman regattas; one highlight was the wiii at 
the Atlantic Coast Championships at the US Naval 
Academy. The coed team's season was highlighted 
by an early season win at Yale, winning the Nevin's 
Trophy for the first time ever, victory at multiple _ ^ 
iiitersectionals including the Hap Moore Team Race 
at the US Coast Guard Academy. Overall, the team 
won 16 regattas, five of which were intersectionals. j. 
The women's team also had an excellent season with •' 
highlights such as winning the Regis Bowl and placing f 
fourth at the Womeii's Atlantic Coast Championships. -^ 

The team is looking forward to continued 
success and improvement in the spring season. 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



„ ,. -l.T-an IS tf' A I. '-• 




^.;- 



Above: Julie Howe ;md Re 
on the dock. 



son relnxint; between races. Below: The tciim gnrbcrs 





\hove: The team sets out tor a regatta. Below Lett: Two Boston College boats sailing in a home regatta. Below right: The seniors stop lor .1 phoiu before a teampractice. 




'hotos courtesy ot Julie Howe 



■Spnrr.s 



Ai 



MEN'S TRACK 

Distancing the Opponent 



ny sports team will see it as a good sign to start the 
season off with a win. But, with the men's track 
.team victory over Harvard in their first meet of 
the year, it wasn't just an ordinary good start. In fact, it 
was the first time in coach Randy Thomas' 18 year career 
with the team that they beat the Crimson. And, while 
senior co-captain Ashley Jefferson had an impressive 
opening showing, it was an unlikely group of freshman 
who put the Eagles over the top. Adam Moitoso, Frank 
DiVittorio and Connor Farrell all contributed to the 
season's first big win with individual successes. The last 
event of that first meet, and the event that sealed the 70- 
68 triumph for the Eagles, was won by the all-freshman 
relay team of Farrell, DiVittorio, Patrick Mella and Jeff 
Klatsky, laying the foundation for a promising year and 
showing that the talent may be young, but it is strong. 
As the season continued with a meet against Boston 
University, however, Jefferson set out to prove the talented 
freshman were being helped by some quality leadership. 
He finished in the top six in each of the three events he 
competed in. Coming out strong in the beginning of the 
season, the men's track team laid the foundation for a 
season long-standing coach Thomas could be proud of. 



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Trevor Rozier-Byrd pushes himself as he tries to catch an opponent. 

Phntn CourtcsT o/ Men's Track Team 




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Spnrrs 



WOMEN'S TRACK 

An Eventful Season 



acing Harvard in their first meet of the season, 
T the women's track team had a lot to be worried 
. about — the Crimson have traditionally been very 
worthy opponents. However, while the team may have 
gone in with some reservations, they must have left them 
all at the door. The Eagle's took nine of the 1 5 events in 
the first meet and defeated Harvard in a 77-50 victory. 
Sophomore Kasey Hill and junior Jessica Fazekas both 
had impressive showings, each of them taking more than 
one event. Hill and Fazekas were joined in success by 
the cross couiitry All-American Maria Cicero and also 
by senior Megan Mara, who broke her own pole vaulting 
record from last year in the season opener. Freshman 
Mary Heitkamp and senior co-captain Melissa Sherman 
proved in that first meet that the Eagle's strength was 
coming from all classes when each won their respective 
event. Such an impressive first meet put the women's 
track team in good standing for a triumphant season full 
of victory and record setting success. The team went on to 
place first in its first quad meet at Boston University. Hill 
and junior Kristen Coon went on to each win multiple 
events at the UNH invitational, the teams last meet in 
January. Freshman Alison Fogarty was also victorious, 
winning the 400-meters. Senior Saki Sugano won the 
pole vault and Fazekas took the shot put competition. 
At the Valentine's Invitational at Boston University, the 
team had excellent individual successes, including good 
showings from Sugano, Hill, and Coon. In the Big East 
Championships, the team finished in sixth place, with 
53 points, more than doubling its score from last year. 





COLLEGE 



^inii 



12 






i'M^l 




Laurel Bualick looks ro her cohcI 
P/ioto Cimncay of Women's Track 




A runner rounds a K-nJ during a race. 
P/ioco Cowruyf of Women'i Track Team 



A R(- runner holds a haton as she awaits ihe start ol a r.i 
Photo Courtesy oj \V(;mi.'n's Track Tciim 



^'■MKtii: 



7%^ 




27 



\bove: A BC runner canies the baton during a race. Below Left: Laurel Burdick concentrates as she pushes herselt during an outdoor meet. Below Right: Alexis Lake splashes through water 
LS she competes in a race. Photos Courtesy of Women's Traek Team 




.Spnrr.s 



T 



GOLF 

Driving Ahead 



he men's golf team looked forward to a bright start 
to the 2004-2005 season after finishing 4''' in the 
BIG EAST championships in the spring of 2004- 
The BC men's golf team started the season with a 15''' place 
finish out of 17 teams in the University of North Carolina 
Invitational. While this seemed a disappointing start, a 
bright spot was seen in the improvement throughout the 
rounds. A rough first round placed them at 21 over par, 
but in the second round, the team recovered to only 12 
over par. In the final round, they remained consistent, 
and finished the tournament ahead of two other teams. 
Following the initial rough start, the team saw increased 
success through the next few tournaments. They 
finished 4* in the Central Connecticut State University 
Invitational Tournament, then improved to 3"' in the 
McLaughlin Cup. This was followed up with a 4* place 
finish in the College of William and Mary Invitational. 
To finish up the fall season, in the NEIGA championships, 
BC finished an impressive 9* out of a field of 46 teams. 
Kyle Kelly led the team, finishing 5* overall in the 
tournament. After a disappointing start to the season, 
the team saw a great improvement in their play, and looks 
forward to continuing this success in the spring season. 



Right: A member of the women's golf team carries her equipment as she- 
moves to the next hole. Below: A coach shows a BC golfer a new techniqiic 
to hold her club to improve her swing. Below Right: A BC golfer putts duriny 
a game. Below Far Right: A golfer stretches with her clubs prior to a game. 





iiii Stiuhiji 



After a strong spring 2004 season, the women's golf team 
had great expectations for the fall season. A 3"' place 
finish in the spring BIG EAST championships paved the 
way for a strong start. Following the leadership of coach Frank 
Kolarik, last year's BIG EAST women's golf coach of the year, the 
team got their fall season underway at the Dartmouth College 
Women's Invitational. They placed 8* out of 20 teams. Court- 
ney Tincher led the team, finishing 23"^ overall, at 22 over par. 
At the Kentucky Wildcat Invitational, the team finished in 
last place, a disappointing follow up to a bright start. However, 
the team still had a success in Elizabeth Friel, who finished 
36* overall, and Katie Napleton, who finished 39* overall. 
Following this finish, the team saw an improvement as they fin- 
ished in 16' place,outof 17 teams. However, much improvement 
was seen in the next tournament, the Yale Women's Fall Inter- 
collegiate Tournament, in which BC finished 5* out of 9 teams. 
KatieNapleton finished a team best 7th overall in the tournament. 
The final tournament of the fall season was the Ross Resorts 
Invitational. The Eagles finished 9* overall, led by Elizabeth 
Friel's 9* place finish. After a less successful than expected fall 
season, the women's golf team looks forward to a spring 2005 
season resembling the highly successful spring 2004 season. 



Right; A BC golfer follows through on a drive during a tournament. Below: 
A. BC golfer stands with a coach between holes while watching her team- 
mates. Below Right: A member of the women's golf team lines up the shot. 





.Sporr> 



247 



WOMEN'S CREW 

Gaining Momentum Down the Stretch 



The women's rowing team looked 
forward to a strong 2004-2005 season 
after finishing sixth out of nine teams 
in last year's BIG EAST Championship. 
In the first meet of the season, the women's crew 
team finished first in the First College-Eight race 
at the Riverfront Recapture Regatta. They also 
won the First College-Four race. Following this 
was the prestigious Head of the Charles Regatta. 
The Eagles finished 17'*' in the Championship 
Fours, 27'*' in the Youth Fours, and 35'*' in th 
Championship Eights. While these were not the 
results the team had hoped for, they provided 
inspiration for the next race, the Princeton Chase. 
The Princeton Chase saw the Eagles in their best 
performance of the season. The Women's Open 
Four team finished eighth out of 51 teams, and 19''' 
out of 45 teams in the Women's Open Eight. These 
finishes were what the team had been hoping for and 
put them in a comfortable position for the final race 
of the fall season, the Foot of the Charles. The Eagles 
finished fifth out of 21 boats in the Varsity Four race, 
the Novice Eight team finished ninth out of 16 boats, 
and the Varsity Eight finished fourth out of 12 boats. 
The team went into the winter off-season feeling 
very confident for the spring after seeing tremendous 
improvement after each race in the fall season. 






'^J: 







— •t«i»»"t^«i 



The team takes a break from rowini; to smile for a picn 
Phutu Courtesy of the Wrjmen'i Crew Team 




Tliu team (jliJes down the Charle^ Riv cr .i-. the sun sets. 
I'hoio Courtesy of the Women 's Creic Teiiin 




Above: The team rows down a canal during a practice in Fhu iJ.i l-» l 'w Left: Prior to rowing, the team strotcl^cs in the bi '..ir. Below 1\il;Iii flic ream picks up the boat before n pni 
Photos Courtesy of the Women's Crew Team 




■Sports 



SUPERFANS 

- Loud and Proud - 










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Above: A footKill player Jump^ inio the Supcrfan Hrcliun hchlnd tlii; cnJiunc after AhuM-; Siipirlaii'- w.wv ilnir li.iiuK aiul luaiii spirit Miiks as ilu-y iIkh i La I ■( , I'hniu In I (,-ai/ki Caiv 
a touchdown. P/ioio /n Hauher Page Top: Supcrfans feed off of tliu energy of their friends and peers. Photos by Heather Page 

Top: Baldwin cheer* the football team on. Photo by Heather Page 




The father of freshman offensive tackle Ty Hall shows off his BC spirit with a hat featuring eagles and his son i\-. unii. 



Spnrt-s 



CLUB SPORTS 

A League of their Own 



Almost 4,300 undergraduate students 
participate in some form of athletics at 
Boston College each year. Some of the most 
competitive dedicated, and successful are 
the men and women that fill out EC's club 
team rosters. From Karate to Rugby, Figure 
Skating to Field Hockey, the Boston College 
cluh teams are competitive in New England 
and beyond, all throughout the country. The 
teams practice hard and reap the benefits, 
bringing home numerous awards and rank- 
ing in national tournaments. Though not all 
of the cluh sports hold try-outs and not all of 
them have mainstream varsity counter-parts, 
and while there is less recognition for these 
teams in the light of BC's varsity team success, 
each and every club team is dedicated to prac- 
tice and play that meets and exceeds the Bos- 
ton College standard of excellence on and off 
their respective fields. These teams play other 
club teams or JV squads from many different 
colleges and universities to hone and perfect 
their talents. With squads made up of as few 
as a dozen and as many as 50 members and 
spanning an incredible range of activities, the 
club sports at BC could not be more diverse. 
One thing, however, runs uniform between all 
Boston College club teams— they are built on 
a foundation of hard work and team unity. 







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The Equestrian 
team poses with 
their banner as they 
show off the awards 
that they have won. 



( 



Photo courtesy of BC Equestrian Club 




The women's rughy 
team battles during 
a scrum. 



Photo courtesy of Margaret Obenneier 




The mcn'i rugb>' tc... 



. tront of the goal postJ before a ganiu. I'hilo Limrtusy uf (y u^ I an a 



Kristen Abels '06, defense 
Melissa Abruzzese '06, mid 
Liz Adams '06, goal 
Erim Comer '05, forward 
Kate Cournover '08, defense 
Jackie Crandell '08 defense 
Kelley Fallon '06, forward 
Megan Flanagan '08, defense 
Kel Forlizzi '07, defense 
Lisa Gallup '08, mid 
Megan Gambale '08, goal 
Caitlin Geddes '07, mid 
Bridget Griffin '07, forward 
Beth Haubrich '08, defense 
Shannon Harrington '06, mid 
Katie Higgins '08, mid 
Liz Higgins '06, forward 
Fran Izzo '05, mid 
Sam Keough '07, defense 



FIELD HOCKEY 

" Shooting for Victory - 



Renee Ledoux '05, mid 
Laura Magno '06, defense 
Shelley Mastalerz '08, mid 
Ariane, Lenis '08, defense 
Alexis Lobodocky '07, goal 
Caroline Lorusso '06, goal 
Katie O'Brien '07, defense 
Meghan O'Neill '06, forward 
Katie Pare '08, forward 
Marina Pastrana '08, mid 
Taryn Prostano '08, forward 
Sarah Quick '08, forward 
Alyssa Raas '08, goal 
Helen Ryan '05, defense 
Natalie Serock '05, forward 
Lauren Seery '05, defense 
Kate Spencer '07, forward 
Colleen Thorton '05, mid 
Katy Vassar '07, mid 




The team does a cheer to get pumped up prior to the 




rhe girls have become very close throughout the season. 



"The strength of the 

team is each individual 

member* ♦. the strength 

of each member is the 

team/' 

" Phil Jackson 



The team poses in front of a goal as they prepare to battle Yale's team. 




BC defends rheir gtial as their opponent tries to push their way up du; Ik LI /Vnito.s Couitc^y o/ l;jin Corner 



Sports I 



KARATE 

Disciplined Competition 



Boston College Karate Club has been 
^S^existence for more than thirty years, and 
has seen a growing number of members every 
year. They compete in the New England 
llegiate Karate Conference against other 
!ollege karate clubs from around the Boston 
"area throughout the year. The club not 
only works on physical strength, but also 
mental ability. The five areas focused on 
are character, honesty, eftort, etiquette, and 
self-control. After each semester, members 
of the club have the opportunity to be pro- 
moted as they earn new belts based on their 
perfomiances and improvement throughout 
the semester. 




The BC Karate club poses as a team during a practice. 
Photo Courtesy of BC Karate Club 




T ; vt Left: The club g()C^ nu! to J J i 

Phoua Courtesy of BC Karau Club 



r iiir^iiii :ilii.r .1 li.iitii.iiiiMii AK>vu Rii;lil; A iihuiIht "i iIil- lIuI' luiii|'c.-ics in .i iniirii,uiR-iil wirh .inniher kar.iit- . inl 




Fop: The women's synchronized skating team smiles before a meet against Boston University. Above Left: The blades for the crew team rest in the water on the dock. Above Right: The 
nen's rugby team gathers before a game. Photos Courtesy of Katelyn D'Allesandro , Men's Club Crew Team , and Greg Tarca 



■Spnrr.s ^ 



MEN'S RUGBY 

Blood for the Brotherhood 



"We have given our sweat and blooc 
for the club. We have earned and hold 
only the highest respect for each and 
every member on the team. To quote 
the pre-game words of our captain, 
'We are all brothers. We are 15 as 1.'" 
'Samuel Pone 









BC Rugby huddles together before a hard fought and muddy match against Penn Stale. BC 
goes on to win 5-0, Penn State was ranked 5th in the nation at that point. 




f'/, Kiji.+> •f<jn>. nt-w looks wjih a new attitude after dvfeiiiing Norwich Military Academy at home 44-12. 
Norwich was at that time ranked 18th in the nation. 



1^ ircg proves any blood lost for nighy is worthy hlood Iom 



Photos courtesy of Qreg Tarca 



WOMEN'S RUGBY 

Ending Season Undefeated- 



Kristen Baum 
Megan Brannigan 
Bridge Casey 

'^ ' man 
Diana Colon 
Patricia Curley 
Jasmine Cutting 
Amanda Del Balso 
Amanda Dellevigne 
Mary Duffy 
Susan Earle 
Elizabeth Ethun 
Victoria Eatwell 
Lindsey Eulberg 
Breanna Finrieron 



Siobhan Forbes 
Amy Green 
Stephanie Holmes 
Eliza Hyiies 
Juliette Koch 
Cariana Loehr 
Jennifer Mahoney 
Clare McNamara 
Mareika McLaughliii 
Elizabeth Merrill 
Caitlin Murphy 
Elizabeth O'Day 
Kerry O'Neill 
Margaret Obermeier 
Somia Quan 



Lisa Quinn 
Paige Rawlins 
Cristina Revetria 
Meghari Rice 
Michelle Sanders 
Kristen Seim 
Ann Sexauer 
Blythe Shepard 
Sandra Simich 
Cara Van Heest 
Marjolein Van Paridon 
Hilary Waldo 
Carolyn Walsh 




laver f'iehts to 




he team poses before a game 

f 



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he girls surge to gain pONscsMim .il the ball during 
:runn. 



The girls lift a teammate during a lineout. 



hotos courtesy of fAargaret Obermeier 



Spnrrs 



The Foundations of 

PRACTICE 



When a big game comes, 
often the only focus is on 
how a team plays in that 
particular event. However, one of 
the most important things leading 
up to any contest is the preparation 
that goes into it. Before any team 
can hope to have a successful season, 
they must first focus on the basics. 
Leading up to every season, teams 
gather for their first practices. 
Whether it means arriving to school 
over the summer or anxiously await- 
ing the beginning of winter and spring 
season practice, dedication goes far 
beyond attendance at every game. 
Early morning practices or after- 
noon scrimmages are just the begin- 
ning of what each athlete must do. 
The adjustment from high school 
to college sports is an immense one. 
Rather than going to school for the 
same amount of time of each day and 
then going to practice, there is no 
specific schedule. Classes are not in 
a set time every day, and not every- 
one does the same things. However, 
practice provides a set activity that 
occurs at a specific time. Even 
if it means that an athlete must 
take an Sam class, an athlete does 
what is necessary to fit their work 
in with their practice, as well as 
games. As a result of this, playing 



a sport requires the ability to bal- 
ance time and to be dedicated fully 
to something other than school. 
Most importantly, the necessity 
of practice does not only apply to 
varsity athletes, but to clubs and 
intramurals as well. While the 
level of intensity is far greater for 
the varsity teams, the others must 
still work to play as a team and 
learn how to work with each other. 
Endless hours of lifting, running, 
and practicing before and through- 
out the season help the teams 
build up strength and unity. At 
the time, it is hard to see how it 
will really pay off in the end, but 
when the season begins and the 
games, matches, or meets begin, all 
of the work becomes worthwhile. 
Looking up at a scoreboard or a 
scorer's table and seeing BC vic- 
torious is a joyous feeling for all, 
whether they are on the field, court, 
or ice, in the stands, or watching on 
television. However, while this feel- 
ing seems overwhelmingly strong to 
everyone, the satisfaction of putting 
so much hard work and effort into it 
for the athletes makes it that much 
stronger and more worthwhile. 




Spnrrs 



WOMEN'S SOCCER 

— Kicking it up a Notch — 




rhc team p' , . 

Ph/jUjiCrAinesy nf Debbie Pare 



I'*, nurt^ in I hii.KIk- (it Jl^oiss Nlt.llfgu-- Jiifin;: HK' L'.Mi 



MEN'S CREW 

Churning Throui^h the Charles 




AI"'M\L-: Mciabci^ "i i1k men's club crew team practice on the Charles Ri\'er 



The team is out far an early ride. 



Sports I 




he Boston College Fig- 
ure Skating Club was 
founded at the beginning 
of the 2001-2002 academic year. 
Since their inaugural season, they 
[have grown by leaps and bounds 
and have had wonderful successes. 
There are tw^o components to the 
figure skating club: the individual 
:or freestyle aspect and the team 
^synchroniied skating aspect. The 
club competes in both disciplines 
and has consistently moved up in 
the ranking each year. 
The freestyle component is much 
like a gymnastics meet, in which 
each skater performs individually, 
but their placement and points 

tare added to the team score. Last 
year, because of the outstand- 
ing placements at competitions 



FIGURE SKATING 

- Synchronized for Success - 



in the Eastern Divisioii, they were 
the alternate team tor the National 
Championships. 

The synchronized component is per- 
formed as a group. Up to 20 girls skate 
together on the ice to make different 
formations, incorporating all aspects 
of figure skating, from jumping to 
edge work. Last year they qualified 
tor the National Championships in 
the synchronized discipline and trav- 
eled to San Diego to compete. They 
placed 10th out of a field of almost 
20 teams. This year, the team began 
the season, hoping to improve on 
their standings in both freestyle and 
synchro and make it to the freestyle 
National Championships. 




The team poses on their home ice in Conte Forum. 




Tara Behr '06 
Krista Benson '07 
Caroline Black '08 
Lauren Carfora '08 
Kasey Coyne '08 
Katelyn D'Alessandro '06 
Victoria Devins '07 
A Hyson Fortier '06 
Andrea Fraser '05 
Jessica Grimes '05 
Mailory Halpin '08 



iiij .IS they wait for their pi;ine u 



Meredith Halpin '05 
Ainsley Jones '08 
Emily Kim '08 
Emily Krol '08 
Emily Labriola '07 
Becca Levy '05 
Meghan Lortie '07 
Michaela Maione '08 
Melissa Marchionna '07 
Allison McDonough '07 
Lynn Mc In tyre '06 



Janice Pardue '08 
Joelle Pedersen '07 
Molly Rotsch '05 
Caroline Shields '08 
Jessica Smith '06 
Allison Timmons '08 
Kelly Varney '08 
Julie Wang '05 
Lisa Zappala '08 
Kathryn Zioto '08 



Photos couTUsj of Kmelyn D'Aleuandro 



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BC figure skaters smile in the locker room hcfore siardnt^ il 



illlpLllt lull. 



EQUESTRIAN 

Riding High 



Katerina Paparsenos '05 
Chrissy Burgess '05 
Taylor Goodell '06 
Allison Gross '07 
Jenny Carnival '05 
Elyse Calvo '05 
Jen Croft '05 
Erina Megowan '05 
Tom Caliendo '06 
Jocelyn Petitto '06 
JillianDifazio'Oe 
Alana Mahoney '06 



Kyle Quilici '07 
Jena Wirth '07 
Alexis Rife '07 
Katie Lupo '07 
Julie Kanner '07 
Sonya Singh '07 
Elizabeth Penniman '08 
Eileen Walsh '08 
Julie Koch '08 
Caitlin Jensen '08 
Lauren Heggerick '08 
Alicia Jovais '08 



u 






4 


;.■. '^fi'tf i# • 


<^ 


* < 


l^irui 





The team poses 
in their barn wrh 
their horses. 






Left: A BC rider 
shows her perfect 
riding form. 
Right: ABC 
steadies her| 
she prepares 
for a ride 




An equestian club member poses witli her Irorse in the 
stable. 



A rider jumps over an obstacle during a competition. 



?\\iAoi courtesy of BC Equestrian Club 




SENIOR 



EdltedBy: 

ErlnKlewiti 

RoGHelle Schneider 



■;. :««; 




our years ago, we were a different group of 
people. We were seniors in high school who 
thought we owned the world. We led our 
schools with determination and overwhelming confidence, yet 
there was a slight anxiety about what was to come when we 
entered college. As we started our careers at Boston College 
in the fall ot 2001, we were quickly bonded in a unique way as 
we joined together for comfort on O'Neill Plaza on September 
11*. The national tragedy and ensuing war marked the begin- 
ning ot college lite and certainly has had an impact all of us. 
Still, we were unwavering in our desire to make these four years 
memorable for much more positive reasons. We excelled in the 
classroom, in athletic competition and in numerous organiza- 
tions, all while developing memories with friends that will be 
the foundations of relationships for the rest of our lives. We 
watched our football sweep Notre Dame, we learned of the 
first two Rhodes Scholarships awards for the university, we 
witnessed the purchase of the Archdiocese property that will 
undoubtedly prove invaluable to future generations. We cried, 
laughed, cheered, studied, agonized and partied and we did it 
all together. Though our lives have all been decidedly unique 
while at BC we share a common experience that will always be a 
special bond; we are Eagles for lite. Marisa Fusco and Myra Chai 




Spending time with good friends 



^ucnson and Mike Ward 



Memories That Will 



Last A Lifetime... 











r-i Goodhue, CoIIccn Thornton* Caitlin Plctchcr, Saya Dcmpscy, Claire 1 hilliLi.ui. Kt»clullL- Schncuicr, Jackit 1 1. 



>f.iii, .iiiJ Lrin Kl- 




Believe 
inBC! 



I finj^ n Siiperfan is one of the most iinifyint; aspects of the Boston 
College experience, h is quite a sight to see the hui;e mass of yellow 
in the student sections of toothall frames and at other sporting events, 
where students deck themselves out in their Superfan t-shirts with pride. 
Each class - seniors, junitirs, sophomores, and freshmen - is distinguished 
hy the saying on the hacks of their shirts. Adorned on the hack oi the 
class of 2005's shirts is the phrase "Always Believe in BC!" And with such 
successful teams in all of i>ur men and women's athletic programs, it is tair 
to say that Boston College students do always helieve in BC! Having great 
teams to watch and support will surely encourage the graduating class oi 
2005 to come hack as alumni to cheer on their Eagles in years to come. 



"In no other situation would I be tempt- 
ed to wear a flaming yellow t-shirt in 
public, but on Saturday afternoons in 
the fall, nothing looks better than a 
sea of yellow cheering on the Eagles!" 

- Kate Griswold 



Sarah Guldstein, Elana Western 




I Ir.i^ HMinali 




Cimberly Bouchard, Julia Clause, and Erin Richardson 




Dan Shaw antl Joe Ritacco 



Kate 1 leiiry, Eli:abctl"i Henry, and Cliristine Mitcheli 



"The traditions that I have 
been a part of at Boston 
College have provided me 
with a strong sense of com- 
munity and confidence that 
I know will allow me "ever 
to excel" continue to strive, 
and always to believe in the 
BC class of 2005!" 

- Valeria Castanaro 

I 



The Class of 2005 
Senior Perspectives 

These ten exceptional seniors were 
chosen by their peers to be among the 
top graduates of the class of 2005* They 
represent the Boston College motto 
- "Ever to ExceP^ - in their academic, 
co-curricular, and everyday lives* 



Lindsey Bazzone 

"My bags are packed." -Bryan Adams 



Student athletes are to be applauded for their ability 
to balance schoolwork with playing a team sport, and 
Lindsey Bazzone epitomizes the phrase "student-ath- 
lete." Lindsey is a 4-year Varsity ice hockey player, is 
pursuing a double-major in English and Biology, and is 
involved in the pre-med program. Lindsey is also a part 
of one of the select group of students that performs 
research in the Biology department. For the past two 
years, she has worked with Professor Shahabuddin do- 
ing research on malaria and infectious diseases. She 
hopes to continue this undertaking after graduation 
as she attends medical school with an eventual career 
in scientific research. Symbolic of her dual success, 
Lindsey is a recipient of the Athletic Director's Award 
for Academic Achievement as well as the Hockey East 
Athlete of the Week Honor. Even more impressive 
is that Lindsey excels even while battling the rarest 
fi)rm of muscular dystrophy. Her upbeat attitude and 
dedication make her an asset on the hockey team, 
an exceptional student, and a good friend to many. 




Macarena Corral 

"Your talent is God's gift to you. What you do with it is your gift back to God." 

-Leo Buscaqua 

Few people can say they have visited six countries, let 
alone lived in six. Macarena Corral is an exception to this 
rule, having lived in Spain, Puerto Rico, the Dominican 
Republic, Japan, and Mexico, along with the United 
States. Besides being a worldly woman, Macarena is 
focused and ambitious both inside and outside of the 
classroom. As a Human Development and Psychology 
double-major, she takes a full course load and manages 
to volunteer throughout the Boston area. She has worked 
at the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center as an Emergency 
Services Intern / Medical Advocate, providing support to 
rape survivors. Macarena also interned at the Home for 
Little Wanderers Parental Stress Line as a phone counselor 
and Stress Management Coordinator. Currently, she is 
working on a thesis studying cultural differences among 
the American, Hispanic, and Hispanic-American social 
experience. At Boston College, Macarena has participated 
in undergraduate research and has been very involved in 
the Organization of Latin American Affairs as the public 
relations director and the culture show coordinator. What 
impresses friends and acquaintances most about Macarena 
is her commitment to helping others. She epitomizes the 
Jesuit philosophy that advocates men and women for 
others. Her extensive volunteer work and impressive 
academic achievements make her a truly standout senior. 

Patrick Downes 

"One man can make a difference and every man should try." -John R Kennedy 




A self-proclaimed "BC Fanatic," Patrick Downes truly 
is the biggest Superfan. In conversation, it is impos- 
sible to miss his passion and love for Boston College 
and all that it represents. Since he lives in Cambridge 
and many of his family members are alumni, Boston 
College has been part of Patrick's life even before he 
attended. He truly has made many unique contribu- 
tions to the community. Patrick has been involved 
in Campus Ministry in various respects as both the 
director of Kairos retreats, as well as a participant 
in the Arrupe Volunteers in a service trip to Belize. 
He is both a committee member and speaker on the 
Church in the 21st Century Advisory Committee, 
formed in response to the Church scandals of 2002. 
One of the biggest endeavors that Patrick has under- 
taken is the Freshmen "First Flight" Convocation. 
The vision behind the convocation is to add to the rich 
traditions at Boston College by continuing the orienta- 
tion process even after the students arrive. Patrick's 
future plans involve a career in public policy or law. 
His passion for people and enthusiasm for Boston 
College makes him an inspiration on this campus. 



GOI ^ '^^GE 





/ 



Sen inns ^J-'^: 



Michael Aaron Flicker 



ii^ 



'We are at our very best, and we are happiest, when we are fully engaged 

in work we enjoy/* - Earl Nightingale 

A Philosophy and PoUtical Science double-major and in 
the Honors program, Michael Aaron Flicker is a member 
of the Cross and Crown, the most prestigious honor in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Throughout his career 
at Boston College, he has challenged himself academi- 
cally, socially, and professionally, leaving his imprint 
on the campus. Michael Aaron started the Quality of 
Student Life Committee, whose mission is to bring to- 
gether students and administrators to address concerns 
and evoke positive change. The committee is respon- 
sible for such improvements as the extension of drop/ 
add period, early morning dining hall hours, and the 
free newspapers now available to all students. Michael 
Aaron has also been involved in the Boston College 
Marching Band and Pep Band. He was a member of the 
Student Organization Funding Committee for two terms 
and is currently an executive consultant for "Now You 
Know." Outside of Boston College, Michael Aaron runs 
and co-owns a company with a high school friend. The 
company, XenoPsi, is hired to create websites and com- 
puter technology for various businesses in nine states. 
An all-around impressive man and over-achiever, Mi- 
chael Aaron has truly excelled in all aspects of his life. 




Michael Hundgen 

Do not go where the path may lead; go instead where there is no path and 

leave a trail/* -Ralph Waldo Emerson 




"Take it to the Heights." Michael Hundgen literall 
left his mark on Boston College when he created th 
phrase, which became the slogan for Superfan shirt; 
Mike has been involved with various student organ 
zations across campus, participating in the First Yee 
Experience Program and being an Orientation Leadt 
for two years. He is also active in the Boston Colleg 
Television Office as the creator and anchor of th 
news series "Now You Know." Mike has also volur 
teered through Appalachia, participated in an intern; 
tional service trip to Tijuana, and was the co-creatt 
of the Freshmen "First Flight" Convocation. Outsid 
of Boston College, Mike was a production assistant o 
the television show "Survivor" for a summer. Man 
call him an inspiration, as he excels in various are;i 
and is a great representation of the Jesuit ideals. Hof 
ing to pursue a career in broadcasting in the futurt 
Mike has used his inni>\ation, dri\e, and goodwill t 
positively transform the Boston College community 



Agnes Kasule 

Dreams are realities that lie in your conscious; you just have to wake them up 

and make them happen." - Deborah Norville 



'Busy" is an understatement when referring to Agie 
Casule, who is involved in everything from volunteer 
trganizations to culture clubs. Agie has been involved in 
he African Student Organization since freshman year, 
vhen she started as a dancer, holding various positions 
n the club, such as vice president and her current title of 
lance coordinator. As an international student, Agie has 
Iso been heavily involved in the International Student 
'rogram as the coordinator of the International Advisors. 
Another large portion of Agie's time is devoted to the 
)'Connell House. She has been a manager at the Student 
Jnion, organizing and coordinating freshman programs 
or the past two years. Outside of Boston College, Agie 
s involved in a Ugandan dance troupe in Boston and 
olunteers at a foundation that supports orphans from 
Jganda, where she was born and raised. In the future, 
^^gie would like to work with an intergovernmental 
ir nonpartisan organization on policy issues regarding 
efugees and internally displaced persons. Having 
hosen Boston College due to the friendly nature of the 
ommunity, Agie will miss the truly caring people that she 
las met on campus. And rightly so, the campus will miss 
ler generous spirit and commitment to Boston College. 




Christopher Meehan 

"Nothing in the world is worth having or worth doing unless it means effort, 

pain, difficulty" - Theodore Roosevelt 




Described by friends as engaging and genuine, Christo- 
pher Meehan is the type of person that people seek out 
as a both a confidante and a leader. As he looks toward 
a future in law, his drive and humor will surely make 
him a success. Chris is not only involved at Boston 
College, but he has left his imprint on the campus 
for future Eagles. Befitting someone who appeared 
on America's Funniest People as a 7-year-old Elvis 
impersonator, he founded Asinine Sketch and Improv 
group as a freshman and now leads this venerable 
comedy group as its skit director and head writer. He 
went on to become the founder and current president 
of the Political Science Association (PSA). Chris is 
also the editor of the PSA Newsletter, "Uncommon 
Sense." He is involved in the political scene outside 
of Boston College, interning for the Kerry/Edwards 
campaign this fall, working with high school students 
in order to stress the importance of voting. He has also 
worked with Habitat for Humanity as a local project 
committee coordinator. His great sense of humor, 
drive for excellence, and generous spirit exemplifies 
the qualities of a successful student and a true friend. 



Sehl 



273 



Grace Simmons 

"Do what you can where you are with what you have/^Robert Schuller 

In any given year, there is no greater leader on the 
Boston College campus than the president of the 
Undergraduate Student Government of Boston Col- 
lege (UGBC). And this year, the leader could not be 
kinder or more impressive than our president, Grace 
Simmons. She started as a Freshman Mentee in UGBC 
and held the post as Chief of Academic Affairs for two 
years before being elected President. Essentially, the 
president of UGBC never stops working, but some- 
how Grace has found time to pursue other interests. 
She was an Appalachia Volunteer and participated in 
the Nicaragua Immersion Trip. Grace was an Inter- 
national Advisor and has also been a panelist for the 
Church in the 21st Century programs. A Political Sci- 
ence and Perspectives double-major, Grace is currently 
writing a thesis on democracy and governance issues, 
specifically analyzing the role of international financial 
institutions in combating corruption. Grace is pursu- 
ing a career in Washington, looking to work for the 
State Department or an international development 
agency. A true leader in all respects, Grace is modest 
about all that she has accomplished at Boston College. 
Realizing the importance of all things in life - even the 
small things - Grace will surely prove to be a success. 




Ingrid Wulczyn 

"Our Hves begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter." 

- Martin Luther King Jr. 



With a steadfast and passionate commitment to social- 
justice, Ingrid Wulczyn has become involved in both 
on- and off-campus issues at Boston College through- 
out her years here. She has pledged a great deal of her 
time to the PULSE Council, a group of seventeen select 
students who are the student organizers of the entire 
PULSE program, acting as liaisons between the student 
volunteers and the many different placement contacts. 
After participating in the Pedro Arrupe Nicaragua Im- 
mersion Trip her sophomore year, Ingrid became further 
invoU ed in service. She participated on the council dur- 
ing her junior year and continued on to lead the service- 
trip as a senior. Ingrid is also active in the Global Justice- 
Project on-campus. She hopes to continue her service- 
post-graduation through Peace Corps membership or 
employment at a non-profit organization. As a graduatinj^ 
senior, Ingrid will most miss the group of students with 
which she has surrounded herself, a group of people trul 
y dedicated to the issues of social justice. While 
she has grown through the support of this com- 
munity, she, too, has LinJciubtedly fostered 
and supported development amongst her peers. 




Paul Yoon 

"Some people see things as they are and say why. I dream things that never 

were and say why not?." -John F. Kennedy 

Paul Yoon, an ambitious Philosophy major, has been 
involved in numerous organizations at Boston Col- 
lege since freshman year. One of his largest com- 
mitments involves the U.S. Marine Corps, as he is 
an Officer Candidate. He is also largely involved in 
UGBC, beginning as a freshman in the Mentoring 
Leadership Program and appropriately rising through 
the ranks to sit on the executive staff. Paul also has 
played an active role in Asian Caucus, beginning as 
a freshman representative and culminating with his 
appointment as vice president. Paul has volunteered 
in the Intersections program as a Halftime Summer 
Council member and retreat leader. He is a member 
of the Christian Soldiers and is currently the Teach 
for America Campus Campaign Manager. One of his 
favorite memories at Boston College involves the class 
History and Development of Racism in the United 
States, for which he has been a teaching assistant for 
three semesters. Humble about all of his achievements 
and possessing a quiet confidence, Paul will surely 
excel after Boston College whether he pursues a ca- 
reer in teaching or service work. He truly is one the 
most talented and motivated people in the senior class. 




"No amount of study or learning 

will make a man a leader unless he 

has the natural qualities of one." 

- Archibald Wavell 

Congratulations to the senior 
leaders of the class of 2005! 



Seninrs 




"Living in the Mods has been 
a great experience. Hosting 
parties and tailgating is what 
being a senior is all about. 
Between cooking out on our 
grill or laying out in our back- 
yard, living in a Mod has been 
everything I thought it would 
be and morer - Casey Mullen 



Photo siihnuted by Kristin Aten 



Life in the Mods 



t open houses and orientations before even coming to Boston College in the fall, a major concern of all incoming 
freshmen is where they are going to he living that first year - Newton or Upper campus. People who live on 
L.Upper probably like it from start to finish, while the people living on Newton probably learn to love it after a few 
months and would not trade campuses even if they could. Housing is also an issue sophomore year, as well, where students 
are either lucky enough to be somewhere on Lower campus or stuck on College Road. While Lower campus sophomores 
enjoy suites. College Road people have double rooms and are frustrated with their Lower campus friends for never coming 
to visit them. And finally, students are spread out in many locations junior year, with some people living off campus around 
the Brighton area and others residing somewhere abroad in Europe, Asia, Australia, or another foreign destinatitm. This 
distance, combined with laziness and bad weather, made it even harder for friends to see each other on a regular basis.. 
It is not until our final year at Boston College that the senior class comes together as one. Whether they are in 
the Mods or in one of the many senior dorms, the members of the senior class ai^e reunited on Lower campus for 
their final year as Boston College students. They are no loiiger a bus ride or walk across campus away from one 
another, but rather they are just minutes from each other for the first time. This reunion sets the foundation for 
their senior year, where they can easily meet up with friends and have the senior privilege of registering parties. 
Li\'ing in the Modular Apartments - or "the Mods" for short - is a traditional seiiior experience. Only the first couple 
dozen lottery picks have the option of livirig in the Mods, and people who choose to live in Mods understand that 
it is their responsibility to be hosts or hostesses to their friends who live other places around Lower campus. With 
their nice backyards, grills for barbequing, patios, and two floors, the townhouse style living oi' the Mods make it a 
prime hangout for tailgating, weekend parties, and various other get-ttigethers. With an exciting football season, 
which included a Notre Dame defeat for the fourth straight year, and the unfathomable World Series victory for 
the Red Sox, there was definitely enough for the class of 2005 to celebrate - unless you are a Yankees fan, of course! 




I'tuiUi iuhmitieti /?> Chnstiru; Ualey 



"The Mods are 
not conducive for 
doing work of any 
kind. There are 
always distractions!' 
-anonymous 





Photo by Angela Kim 



"I love being able to come back and live on campus for my 
senior year, especially because so many of my friends and I 
were abroad last year. I like being able to go to my friends' 
parties on campus and having them over my Mod for football 
games. Moving back on campus has definitely made hanging 
out with my friends more accessible and we get to have the best 
housing and best parties on campus!" - Christine Marchese 




Phoio iubmiiicd b\ Mark Swiiaj 



Photo submitted by Alexandra Wappcl 



Seniors 




in Btnslcy, '.■- 1 ;ii i f 



Marci ( ill \ 111 ;iik1 Kristy l.;imbr<iu 




,-nii;) Riis. M.iry Allisi)[-i Timby, Christine Bolckti, Mi.mI i i Ii I i linn, .hiJ i ,1iristine Wain 



Seniors! 




Rochelle Schneider, Erin Reilly, Caitlm IVrLher, and Laura Goodliue 



Gail Ryan, Denise Hoffecker, Ivy Cole, Monica Suarez, Saya Dempsey, 
Claire, Dulligan, and Adam Webster 



Monday to Sunday, 
you can find us out! 




■ I li, (jci)ffrcy Riiy, Casey Lclit-r, and Owen ChrLstenscn 




Siinili Foster and Kaydhl Valipour 







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Elizabeth Amento 


Marci Girvtn, Kristy Lambroti, 


andEli:alvll 


1 M;.ir,)ii,L:ell 



Nina Clarke, Rich Bucolo, and Rob Delanders 



"I can't help but remark on 
the fine establishment that 
has provided all legal Eagles 
with a home away from home 
for years: Maryanns! And we 
love it!" - Alicia True, *05 

I 




Kelly Hickman. Jackie Rada, and Lindsey Eulbers 



Luci Posillico, Laura Kebel, Jennifer Hirsch, Andrea Casassa, and Jcnnitcr Nowak 




Dell Pare, Emily Hardy, Mo Walsh, Katherine Cadwell, Julie Predki, Laura Frado, and Collen Fitzgerald 




ison Williams and Anc McLaughlin 



"Four years and four Notre Dame 
defeats. I will never forget walk- 
ing out of the stadium in South 
Bend after the victory to the deaf- 
ening cheers of the Boston College 
Eagles!" - Erin Reilly 



BC vs. ND 

We hope you brought a broom... it's a sweepl 

i atLirday, October 23, 2004, was a day to remember for all Boston College students. On this day the Eagles of Boston College 
■ defeated longtime rivals, the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame, with a score of 24-23. This fourth consecutive victory was especially 
y bittersweet for the seniors, as it would be their last rivalry game ever. In actuality, it would also be the last for many Boston 
College students, given that the two teams will not play each other again for several years. However, this year's game was special 
to the senior class for other reasons. This particular year, the game was played not in Alumni Stadium, but halfway across the 
country at Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. Road trippiiig to South Bend to watch two of the biggest rivals in college football 
is often associated with the senior class, and this year was no exception. One could see many RVs parked in the Mods the day 
befc-ire the game, ready to make the 14 hour long trip to Notre Dame carrying Superfans ready to cheer on their Eagles. The game 
was also sentimental to this year's seniors, who share their last year at BC with Boston College's last year in playing Notre Dame 
for a while. For every member of the class of 2005, the BC/ND rivalry formed an important part of the foundation of their college 
experience, and four wins during their four years doubtless motivated them to live up to their class slogan - Always Believe in BC. 



"Notre Dame game = the greatest gift they could give a 
senior. Knowing that you have so many Boston College seniors 
around you cheering for your team, your best friends - decked 
out in as much BC apparel as possible - right beside you, and 
a scoreboard saying "BC beat ND" for the fourth time in a row! 
Nothing could be better!" - Kate Henry 




ouTW Bend G 





FULLER 

MOTORHOME 
y RENTALS a. 



Kajahl Valipour and Beth Ann Rutolo 




"Eagles eat Leprechauns!" 

- Caitlin Riley 



BC defeats ND for the fourth year in a row, 24-23 



Seninrs 



Stephen Acanipa 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Adam Adamek 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Elizabeth Adams 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



John Adams 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Sean Adams 

School of Management 

Finance 




Ihioma Adighibe 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Raakhi Agrawal 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Kaitlin Ahem 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Ryan Ahern 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Sean Ahn 

School of Management 

Economics-CSOM 




Kemi Akinyele 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



Robert Albanese 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

History 



Marco Albano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Lindsay Albert 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Romance Lang - French 

Mu^ic 



Andrew Alberts 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




School of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Fia Aliotta 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



f.ihKp Alws 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Julie AKin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



I '.inii'l Ambriisio 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Joann Amico 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Lain Anderson 

School of Management 

Finance 



Marc Amico 

School of Management 

Corp Report & Analysis 

Finance 



Carolyn Amoroso 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Music 



Daniel Amoruso 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



David Andrews 

School of Management 

Finance 



Imran Ansari 

School of Management 

Finance 



Marisa Anthony 

School of Management 

Marketing 

ULimaii Rf'-OLiivi''- Vlgnit 



Vanessa Apicerno 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Theology 



Jessica Appelman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Krystle Arcamo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Drew Archer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Katherine Andersen 

School of Arts &: Sciences 

Communications 




Frank Antonacci 

School of Management 

General Mgmnt 




Emily Arciszewski 

School of Management 

Finance 




Eric Ares 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

History 



Deanna Arizzi 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jacqueline Arko 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



MarkArmeno 

School of Management 

Finance 



Andrew Armstrong 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

History 




William Arnjult 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Kelly Amstein 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Studio Art 



Elizabeth Aron 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Stephanie Aronzon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Sanjay Arora 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 




Christine Arzeno 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Camille Asher 


Kristin Aten 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


Biology 


Elementary Education 


Philosophy 


Human Di'\ I'lopnu'nl 



Geoffrey Atkins 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Gregory Auffenberg 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Robert Augenthaler 


Robert Augusta 


Jason Aurori 


Lina Avvad 


Ste\'en Ayr 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Marketing 


Finance 
Economics-CSOM 


Political Science 


History 
Philosophy 




Kathcrine Babinski 


Matthew Bacigalupo 


Krislen Baiardi 


1 jiirrii ilaird 


Courtney Baker 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Science 


Communications 


Communications 


English 


Communications 


Communications 



History 



Jane Balas 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Chrisiophor Banks 

School of Management 

Finance 



Robert Barbieri 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Thomas Barletta 

School of Management 

Finance 



Zachary Barlow 
School of Management 

Finance 
Corp Report & Analysis 




Robert Barnikel 

School of Management 

Finance 



Erin Barr 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Theology 

Justin Barrasso 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Patrick Barrett 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Christopher Barrile 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Caitlin Barry 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Katherine Bartel 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Ryan Bartlett 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Allison Basilica 
School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Mary Grace Bateman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Subha Battu 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Kristen Baum 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Lindsey Bazzone 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

English 



Siobhan lH'a^ll'_\ 

School of Arts & Sciences 

PJiilosophy 



Sarah Beauchemin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 




Rob Rich ;ind Michelle RedJy 



Kristin hiiicctia ;inJ S^iya I V-inp- 




1 



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Mike Hundgen, Matt Pierson, Matt Druchman, and Pat Dowiils 




Christian Kubic and Stephanie lannucc 




Brian Duggan, Andy Inocenti, (,jci4Iilv Rny, an J Will (,'utrunc 






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James Moran, Lucy Bueti, and Scott Maffei 





Liz Holllnger, Shannon Donovan, and Christine Bourque 



Meghan nonnhrrty, ( :aiihn Engler, and Suhha Battu 




Andrew Beaver 

School of Management 

Finance / Marketing 

Tech Mgmt 



Caitlin Becl<er 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Mary Behymer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Laura Belden 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Brian Belke 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




Alvin Bell 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Environment Geoscience 



Brian Bell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Melissa Bell 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Heather Bello 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Catherine Bender 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Classics 




Brian Beneke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Akeya Bennett 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Katherine Bennett 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Lauren Bennett 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Allison Bensley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Philosophy 




Bianca Bcrardi 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Luis Berdeja 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt 

Marketing 



Nicholas Bergn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



llllliiii Bernardo 
School of Management 

Marketing 
1 lum.in Resources Mgmt 



Rai]uel Bernicr 

School of Arls & Sciences 

Biology 




Laura Berntsen 

School of Management 

General Mgmt 



Michael Berrini 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Philosophy 



Julie Berrus 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Halie Berson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Joseph Bertelloni 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Alejandro Bettancur 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Scott Billings 

School of Management 

Finance 

Econi'in 



Thomas Billings 

School of Management 

Finance 

I I onomics 



Christopher Birch 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Mark Bisanzo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 




James Bischof 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Stephanie Bissonnette 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Curt Bitsoff 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Anthony Blaine 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Patrick Blair 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Amy Blajs 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Mark Blakeney 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Christopher Bias 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources 



Matthew Blattner 

School of Management 

Accounting/ Finance 

Information Systems 



Michael Bloch 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 




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Jennifer Boarini 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Christine Boccieri 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Martha Boero 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Margaret Bogacki 

School of Management 

Marketing 

History 



Vanessa Bogosian 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Kari Bohlen 

School of Education 

Elementar}' Education 

Human Development 



Richard Boles 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Anthony Bommarito 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Jeffrey Bonanni 
School of Management 
General Management 



Natasha Bonhomme 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Michael Bonsignore 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jennifer Bonynge 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Tracy Bookspan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Ned Borgman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Drew Bouchard 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 




Kimbcrly Bouchard 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Christine Bourque 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Michael Bouton 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



jost'pli H(i\\ dm 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Karen Boyce 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Elizabeth Boyle 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child in Society 



Michael Bozza 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Caitlin Bracken 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



llouise Bradford 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Spanish 



Lindsey Branca 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Peter Brancale 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Andrew Brassard 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Susan Breaznell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Michael Brady 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Abigail Brennan 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Kathryn Brennan 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Communications 



Kaitlyn Brenner 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Eric Brenninkmeijer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Lauren Brescia 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Luke Breslin 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 




Carla Breton 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 



Rachel Brewster 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Kara Bnoliiunn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Linguistics 



Sara Brink 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt 



Ian Brissette 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Spninrs 




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Liz Adams, Shannon Donovan, and John Xellcr 



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Tara Shanes-Hemande:, Kelly Maher, Kin Pohkn. .inJ limriJ W'ulcv: 




Pat Sullivan, Lai. 





Keily Malone, Katie Gianatasio, Tran.^ Kouvun, and Jess Cochrane 




Carly Fraser, Jessie Rosen, and Laura Terlouw 



Susan Doughty, Alex Jung, Amy Racanello, and Chris Nohle 


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Lindsey Eulberg, Molly Stofen, and l.u I u l\.ida 




Girls night out to dinner. 



Stephen Broadhead 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Erin Brody 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Political Science 



Kate Brody 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



CliiibLina L)i\>nbing 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Renee Brooks 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Timothy Brosnan 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Berkley Brown 

School of Nursing 
Nursing 



Brittany Brown 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Malcolm Brown 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Margaret Brown 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Michelle Brown 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 



Sarah Brown 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Child In Society 



Jessica Browne 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Child In Society 



Kelly Brozyna 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kathleen Brumm 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




School of Arts & Sciences 
English 



Dylan Bruno 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Mc'lissj Bruno 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Michael BrLiNoltu 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



t .rori;Kinii PjI'\ .in 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 




Paul Bryco 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Lucy Bueti 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Commuiucations 



Christopher Burke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



David Bucliliolz 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Bryce Buckley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 



Laura Buckley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

A&SB.A 



Christina Burgess 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Bonnie Burgett 

School of Management 

Finance 



Brianne Burke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Danielle Burke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jared Burke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Kathleen Burke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Richard Bucolo II 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 




Caitlin Burke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Raymond Burke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 




Eugene Burmester 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Megan Burrow 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Giacomo Buscaino 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Laura Bustos 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Sociology 



Matthew Butler 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



.Seniors 



Kelly Byrne 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Robert Byrne 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Amanda Cadin 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Katherine Cadwell 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Josepli Caffarella 

School of Management 

Finance 




Michael Cagney 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Philosophy 



Rebekah Cain 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Patricia Caira 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jennifer Calabrese 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Lauren Caldwell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 




Mar\' Callaghan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Brett Callahan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Robert Callan 

School of Management 

Finance 



Elizabeth Callery 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Elyse Calvo 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 




Anthony Camillcri 

School of Management 

CSOM / Accounting 

Philosophy 



Sarah Camire 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Renee Campo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



.Vlaa Ciindido 

School of Management 

Accounting 

History 



Kelly Canitf 

School of Education 

Child In Society 

Early Childhood 




Caroline Cannizzaro 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Elizabeth Caouette 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jason Caperna 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Nicholas Caputi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Anthony Caputo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Sociology 




Andrew Cardona 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting; 



Colin Care\ 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Patrick Carey 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 



Sarah Carlson 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Karen Carlucci 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 




Edward Carney 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Justin Carney 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Jenny Carnival 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Sara Carpenter 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Erin Carr 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 




Megan Carr 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jonathan Carreiro 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Alexandra Carrey-Cooper 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 



Richard Carter 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Katherine Carttar 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Economics 



Seniors 





Julie Zellman, Molly Stofen, and Amy Green 



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Meredith IVni.iina, Tim \,i, lui.l, n,J K> IK I \ .\ 



Heather Speller, Maria Schwciticr, Ann Pcrrin, Kathleen Reilly, andl^iuren Mar 





Lisa D'Avella, Claire DeFilippis, and Sarah Curley 




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Kim Chapman, Samantha Warner, Emily Lattin, and Lindsey Scardino 



Amanda Lalicato, Mark Switaj, Suliha Battu, and Jane Balas 




!.i: Gillcry, Moira 0'< ."imcll, S|x-nccr I IcyJi, < iM-y ( iir.ir. Ii, .mJ limily McGinly 




M;irk I-.iya and Becky Musso 




Laura Cartularo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Andrew Carty 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Andrea Casassa 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Political Science 



Alison Casey 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communications 



Laura Casey 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Theresa Casey 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Environment Geoscience 



Valeria Castanaro 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



John Castiglione 

School of Management 

Finance 

Operation^, Si 1.1 ti'gic Mgmt 



Emilie Castro 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Clelia Castro-Malaspina 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 




Leah Cataldo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 

Economics 



Sal Cataldo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Amy Cebulski 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Derek Cedar 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Laina Ceddia 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Domenic Cedronc 

School of Management 

Finance 



l.injsc\ C.L'i 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Nicole Centeno 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Linds.n Chalmers 

School of Arls & Sciences 

Communications 



iimily Chambliss 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 





Andrew Chan 

School of Management 

Economics 



Christopher Chan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Henry Chan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Christopher Chancier 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Amie Chang 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Charlisse Chang 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Dinah Chang 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Fiv'h-Ji (I SC>F) 



Kai-Hsiang Chang 

School of Management 

Finance 



Kimberly Chapman 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Jennifer Chariot 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

ConiniiinuMtiims 




EUyn Charters 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Azundai Chatman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Christopher Chavaje 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 

Economics 



Kristin Chellgren 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Ka Cheng 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Psychology 




Allison Cherundolo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang-French 

Communications 



Geri Chich 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jennifer Chimelski 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Christine Cho 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



■H-t n^ 

Edward Cho 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Derrick Chou 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Owen Christensen 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Lauren Christie 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Michael Christopher 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Anna Chuang 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 




Nari Chun 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Gina Chung 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Gretchen Ciampi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Maria Cicero 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Alvaro Cifuentes 

School of Management 

Marketing 




trin Ciovacco 
School of Education 
Secondarv' Education 

English (LSOE) 



Stephanie Cizek 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Nora Clancy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Alexander Clark 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang-French 

Philosophy 



Caroline Clark 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English (LSOE) 




jar. ■ 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 
History 



KerrI Clark 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Political Science 



IuIki LLiuse 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



l\y<Hi Ck'tiK'nts 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Moglian Cliiiliin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Economics 



Jessica Cochrane 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math / Computer Science 



Abbey Coffin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Communications 



Rebecca Cohen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Megan Coholan 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Brian Cole 

School of Management 

Finance 



Ivy Cole 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Sociology 



Mason Cole 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kevin Collins 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

rhilcisophy 



Christian Colabelli 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Christina Colone 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Richard Colucci 

School of Management 

Finance 



Brian Conley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Erin Comer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Anthony Comprelli 

School of Management 

Finance 



Lindsey Condon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Christian Conesa 

School of Management 

Economics 

Philosophy 




Jennifer Conley 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Lindsay Conlin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Alyssa Connell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kevin Connell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Economics 







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-4 








We Will Never Forget 

'September 11^^ united this class, this school, and this country in 

a completely unique way' - Christine Boccieri, *05 



Where were you on the morning of September 11, 2001? Only 
a mere week into our first year as college students, our lives 
were changed forever on that fateful Tuesday morning. Some 
people were directly affected by the tragedy, losing close friends and family 
members. Others knew people who lost a loved one. And still others did 
not know anyone who lost someone, but were still emotionally involved as 
citizens of the United States whose country was just attacked. Whichever 
category you fall into, it is safe to assume that you were affected that day 
in your own individual way. Chances are that you also remember the 
details of the day pretty precisely without trying too hard. I surely do.... 
I remember where 1 was when 1 found out what happened and 
who told me. 1 remember trying to call home to see if everyone I knew 
was okay and not getting through because the phone lines were all busy. 
1 remember going to Devlin 008 to watch the live coverage and going to 
the prayer service on O'Neill Plaza at 12pm. I remember finally getting 
through to my mom at home in New Jersey and hearing the news that 
our good family friend worked in the South tower on the 95* floor and 
that no one has heard from him since the towers fell. 1 remember crying 
and hugging my roommate, whom I met less than two weeks earlier. I 
remember doing nothing for the rest of the day. I remember hearing back 
from my parents that they still had not heard from our friend yet and that 
they were all at his house with his wife and son, just waiting. 1 remember 
wanting so badly to be there and going to bed still not knowing if he was 
alive. I remember being in a daze for the next few days. 1 remember 
students chanting "USA" in the Mods on Friday and Saturday nights. 1 
remember talking about the tragedy in classes rather than continuing 
with our regularly scheduled lectures. And lastly, after about a week 
or so, 1 remember finally having to accept that my friend was gone. 
There surely are many stories like this one. The class of 2005 was 
put into a very unique position that day, which set the foundation for their 
Boston College experience as a unified community. As vulnerable college 
freshmen, we were living away from home for the first time and only starting 
to get to know our new friends. With our normal support systems miles away 
all over the country, we were forced to come together as a class to help one 
another grieve the loss of a friend or family member, or just to comfort each 
other at a time when we did not feel safe in our own country for the first 
time in our lives. No matter what September 11*, 2001, means to you or 
what memories, feelings, or emotions it evokes in you, the class of 2005 will 
always remember the continuing kindness, generosity, and support of their 
fellow classmates during and after this very difficult and confusing time. 




Photoi above by Angela Kim 
Opposite page , Photo courtesy o/ Scott Murphey 



"No familiar face was around to comfort you, but somehow, you 
could still find that comfort in the strangers around you. The BC 
community came together, and people from all different parts of 
the country were crying on each other's shoulders and just being 
there for each other as friendsr - Justin Virojanapa, *05 




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Alicia True, Veronica Korb, Caitlin Riley, Sarah Curley, and Heather Matheson 




Hcathur >[ cIlcT, Launi Coppola, and Jcnna Riii 




Kate Walsh, Kathleen Deluca, Zihhy McCleaty, and Danielle Esposito 




Joseph Connolly 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 



Laura Connolly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Matthew Connolly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Rebecca Connolly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Ryan Connor 

School of Management 

Finance 




R\'an Connors 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Timothy Connors 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Emily Conroy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Katherine Conroy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Theron Cook II 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Anne Cooper 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Lindsay Cope 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Claire Copeland 

School of Management 

Information Systems 



Laura Coppola 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



M Elizabeth Cornell 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 




Macarcna Corral 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Psychology 



Brian Corrigan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Christine Cortcllini 
School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 



Jjinie Cosilorc 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Ryan Co.sla 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 




Jaclyn Cote 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Stephen Cote 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Stephen Cottle 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 

German 



Ashley Coutu 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Ashley Cowgill 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 




Patrick Cragan 

School of Management 

Finance 



Ashley Craw 

School of Arts &L Sciences 

History 



Jennifer Croft 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Allyson Cronan 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Drew Cronin 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Finance 




Katherine Cronin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

English 



Jacqueline Croteau 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Elizabeth Crotty 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Brendan Crowley 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



John Crowley-Buck 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

English 




Elisabeth Crupe 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Elizabeth Cummings 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



John Curley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Matthew Curley 

School of Management 

Philosophy 

Marketing 



Sarah Curley 
School of Management 

Finance 
Options Management 




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Emily Curran 


Rhys Currie 


Melissa Currier 


Kari Cushing 


Alisha Cutler 


School of Nursing 


School of Nursing 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Nursing 


Communications 


Marketing 
Finance 


Biochemistry 




Krista D'Agostino 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Todor Dakov 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Andrew D'Alessandro 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Christine Daley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



James Daley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 




Lauren Dalrymple 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Austin Daly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Erin Daly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Michelle Daly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Gina Damico 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Socioloe\' 




Icier Damilatis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Kelly Uamm 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Lauren Daniel 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Laura D'Anlonio 

School of Management 

Accounting 

I- i nance 



Irih Das 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communicalions 



David Dauphinais 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Lisa D'Avella 
School of Management 
Operations /Tech Mgmt 



Ann Davidson 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Jonathan Davis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Katie Davis 
School of Management 

General Mgmt 
International Studies 




Lisa Davis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 



Sara Davis 
School of Management 
General Management 



Susanna Dawson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Lana De Angelis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Heather DeFoer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Joseph Deieso 
School of Management 
Operations /Tech Mgmt 



Robert Delanders 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



Eileen Delaney 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Duncan Delano 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Environment Geoscience 



Christopher Delehanty 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jerry Delerme 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Michael Dellamano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Claire De Filippis 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Finance 




Jason Delaney 

School of Management 

Finance 




Jennitoi' I H'lnui" 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Dcmpscy, Rixht'llc Schneider an^l .'I 



iiriMinii Wain, Molly IVIiviiht, Eli:alicth Htliiiii, aiul Jcnna Riis 





•■ ^mile and ,shu\v oft their BC pride on a trip out to Boston. 



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Veronica Korb, Allison Bensley, Sarah Curley, Alici.i True, ( 'nrt Fiitsi ill, I Irarhcr Matheson, Caitlin Riley, and Clelia Castro-Malaspina 




Kelly Malone, Katie Gianatasio, Alycia Johnson, and Lauren Christie 



Christine Bourque, Matt Pierson, and Patrick Downes 




Michael Del Ponte 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Kathleen Deluca 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Peter De Luca 

School of Management 

Economics-CSOM 



Peter Deluca 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Mathematics 



Meredith Demania 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Jusuf Demir 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Histor\' (LSOE) 



Jameson Dempsey 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Political Science 



Saya Dempsey 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Emily Dendinger 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

English 



Matthew Denes 

School of Management 

Finance 

Computer Science 




Jiasen Deng 

School of Management 

Finance 



Christine Denny 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Carrigan Denny-Brown 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Katie Den Uyl 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Communications 



Ronald Derosa 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Kathleen Dcsbois 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Sociology 



Karen DeSena 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



( .rant Desimonc 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



l.oura DeSisto 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Amy Dcsrosicrs 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Political Science 



Thomas Dettore 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jessalyn Deveny 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Euphemia Devincentis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kristen Uevine 

School of Management 

Finance 



Kristy Devine 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Michelle Devlin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jessica Dewitt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Parsram Dhanraj 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 



Dominick DiCarlo Jr 

School of Management 

Finance 

Political Science 



Aimee Digilio 

School of Management 

Accounting 




4^i:A:k 




Christopher Dillavou 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Timothy Dillon 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Management 



Kathryn Dilworth 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Christopher Di Napoli 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Robert Di I-'ano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Philosophy 




Matthew Dipaoli 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Elizabeth DiPardo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Drew DiPasquale 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Andrew Disalvo 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Environment Geoscience 



Joseph Disalvo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 





Margjret Distasio 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Virginia Di Tata 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Matthew Dobrowski 

School of Management 

Finance 



Erin Docherty 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Education 



Jenevieve Doerr 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

International Studies 




Alison Doherty 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Accounting 



Kerriann Doherty 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Caitlin Dolan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Ryan Dolan 

School of Management 

Accounting 



John Dolce 
School of Education 
Human Development 




Stephen Domeier 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Elizabeth Donahue 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



Nora Donaldson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Laitlyn Donnelly 

School of Management 

Finance 



Erin Donnelly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Megan DonnelK 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Peter Donovan 

School of Management 

Accounting /Finance 

Information Systems 



Sluinncin I )iiiiovaii 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Nathan DoornL'k.imp 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Caitlin Doran 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




jfetp\ 




Matthew Doria 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Meghan Dougherty 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

English 



Susan Doughty 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Math/Computer Science 



Diana Dove 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Rebecca Dow 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Kaitlyn Dowling 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kathleen Dowling 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Maureen Downes 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Patrick Downes 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Caitlin Downey 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




William Downey 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jillian Downie 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Jennifer Dowty 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Chemistry 



C Doyle 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Jennifer Doyle 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 




Kelly Doyle 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Elizabeth Driscoll 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



William Driscoll 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Clare Droesch 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Matthew Druckman 

School of Management 

Marketing 




M;itt Mever and M.irk Switiij 



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Lira Kebel 




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Owen Chnstiensen and Chris Therrien 



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Ready for the form;il 




Mathew Dudle\' 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Johnathan Duff 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Max Duganne 

School of Management 

Finance 



Brian Duggan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Claire Dullighan 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 




Ian Dumanis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Kathleen Dunigan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Sara Dupuis 

School of Management 

Economics-CSOM 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Kelly Dusinberre 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Nicole Duva 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Daniel Dvvyer 
School of Education 
Secondars- Education 

English fLSOE) 



Matthew Dyer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Matthew Eakins 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Alexandra Easton 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jody Ebanks 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 




:res Eboli 
School of Management 
Finance 



Stephanie Eder 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Calhoniic Ellinvvimd 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



D.inu'l I II 

School ot Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



iVUitlhew liilis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theology 



Brian Elwood 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Psychology 



Danielle Esposito 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Sang Eun 

School of Management 

Finance / Accounting 

Philo';(iph\' 



Ryan Fallon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Courtney Engel 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Caitlin Engler 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

American Heritages 



Ross Ericson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Natalia Esperon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




George Esposito 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Elizabeth Ethun 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Lindsey Eulberg 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Vanessa Eulo 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Gregory Evans 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Kellie Faircloth 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Andrene Fair weather 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Christopher Fallon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Amanda Fantry 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Philosophy 



Alexandra Parish 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Leslie Parish 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Bianca Farra 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Megan Farrell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 

Theology 



Matthew Fasano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kristen Faucetta 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Courtney Fee 

School of Management 

Finance 



Meg Feist 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 




Brian Felt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Mark Fennell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Emily Ferbert 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 



Daniel Ferguson 

School of Management 

Finance 



Joharma Ferguson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 




Kathryn Fernandez 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Raquel Fernandez 

School of Education 

Child In Society 

Elementary Education 



Francesca Ferrante 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



Steven Figari 

School of Management 

Finance 



Daphanie Figueiredo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Social Science 




Breanna Imneron 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Mary Finsness 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Krysta l-iorillu 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Elizabeth Firger 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Sara Firoozeh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Sociology 



Naomi Fisher 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Colleen Fitzgerald 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Stephen Fitzgerald 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Timothy Fitzgibbon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Matthew Fitzsimons 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Sean Flanagan 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 



Michealaaron Flicker 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Political Science 



Kathryn Flynn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Theology 



Lindsay Flynn 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Michael Flynn 

School of Management 

Finance 




Christopher Foerch 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



David Foley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Jennifer Foley 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Marketing 



Kaitlin Foley 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Tara Foley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Adelina Fonteb 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



I honias Fors)'the 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Dorothy Fort 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Dominick Fortino 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Sarah Foster 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Elizabetli Fox 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang-French 



John Fox 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Nicholas Fox 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Studio Art 



Laura Frado 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Erin Fransen 

School of Management 

Finance 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Study 




Amy Franson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Sara Franzen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Andrea Fraser 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Carly Fraser 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History (LSOE) 



Colin Fraser 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Scott Freeman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Cynthia Frelund 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Cristina Fua 

School of Management 

Finance 



Lauren Fuentes 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Nicholas Funchion 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Katharine iuny 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Mi.hdcl fus)lli 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Sociology 



VlichciL'! Cabhert 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Economics-CSOM 



kryslal Craboiiry 

School of Management 

Finance 



Aaiulrea C.alccki 

School of Management 

Finance 

Theology 



Kristin Gallagher 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Hugh Galligan 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Barbara Gallo 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Jeffrey Gallotta 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Charles Gangi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Susan Gao 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Raffi Garcia 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



^iikjina Garcia 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Nicholas Gardino 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Megan Gargagliano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



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Peter Gartland 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Danielle Gaudreau 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jennifer Gartner 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Theater Arts 



Shannon Garvey 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Heather Gatnarek 

School of Arts &: Sciences 

Sociology 



Erin Gauthier 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Margaret Gavin 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Mindy Gayer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Alison Gauchat 

School of Management 

Finance 




John Geiger 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Theresa L'Abbate and Owen Christensen 



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Benjamin Gent 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Nicholas Gentile 

Sdiool of Management 

Finance 

Corporate Reporting & Analysis 



Sean Geraghty 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Meredith Gerard 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Tiffany Germain 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Gregory Giacopelli 

School of Management 

Finance 



Kathleen Gianatasio 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Child In Society 



Meghan Gibney 

School of Management 

Finance 



Caitlin Gildea 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Caitlin Gill 

School of Management 

Finance 



Eileen Gillespie 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt 



Gretchen Gilman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Christopher Gilmore 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chenustry 



Lauren Gilfeather 
School of Education 
Human Development 




Cassandra Girardi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Marci Girvin 
Sdiool of Education 
Human Development 



Danielle Gitlit/ 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Kyle Glascotl 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



I .iiirrll Cl.lMT 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Melissa Go-Alcantara 

School ot Management 

Finance 



I 



Kristin Goddard 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



David Goggin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jason Gold 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Caitlin Golden 
School of Education 
Human Development 




Joseph Goljan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Economics 



Patricia Googins 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Gregory Gorra 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Crystal Gomes 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Vera Goncalves 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Economics 



Yocelin Gonzalez 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Colleen Gordon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Thomas Gordon 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Meghan Gorman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Sara Goldstein 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 




Laura Goodhue 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 




Ann Marie Gormley 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics 




Courtney Gosselin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 



Abigail Gotfredson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kori Goulet 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Erik Graham-Smith 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

History 




Robert Gramolini 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Danielle Granville 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Amy Green 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Julia Green 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Margaret Green 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Nathaniel Greene 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Garrett Greer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Kevin Gregg 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Paul Gregory 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Amy Griffin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Edward Griffin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Emily Griffiths 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Andrew Grillo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Christopher Grillo 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jessica Grimes 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Kate Criswold 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Benjamin Grit/. 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Ueburjh Cjru.s.s 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Sjra Groth 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Physics 



Kimborly GrynccI 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Ernest Guadiana 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Psychology 



Sascha Gurevitz 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Theology 



Alyssa Hadley 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Suzanne Guerreri 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Thomas Guest 

School of Management 

Corp Report & Analysis 

Finance 



Kate Gunnery 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Brian Gutierrez 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Eric Gyasi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Sarah Ha 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Stephanie Hadley 

School of Education 

Secondary Ed. 

English 



Patrick Haggerty 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Zachary Haigney 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Lee Guo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Hilary Haakenson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 




Lindsay Halas 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Anthony Hale 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Joseph Halli 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Meredith Halpin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Kathleen Halvorsen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Hrag Hamalian 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Biology A & S B.A 



It's scary to think that well 
all have jobs soon and be in 
different places. I can't imag- 
ine not having my friends 
around. Ill miss being able 
to see them whenever I want. 

- Saya Dempsey 



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Getting advice from the Career Center! 



Graduation will mark the 
culmination of a multi-layer 
education here at Boston 
College. We are now pointed 
in the direction of the fu- 
ture, and though we may 
feel intimidated by the next 
chapter, I think we will be 
able to draw upon lessons 
from the past four years in 
the varied situations we will 
encounter as we continue on 
in our lives. 

- Leah Riviere 




■\ll JrussLvl up ;inJ rciidy tor wurk 





Job searching at the Career Center 



Eagles Leave 

the Nest in 

Search of 

New Heights 

As the class of 2005 comes to the end of their journey through Boston College, 
the lives of these seniors will branch out in a myriad of directions. Some 
will plan to attend graduate school, while others will prepare to enter the 
workforce. Still others may take the time to travel the world or serve our country by 
entering the military. Whatever paths these seniors choose to take, they share many 
of the same hopes and fears about what will change after graduation. Most notably, the 
fear of proceeding into the unknown and leaving the familiar behind strikes even the 
most ambitious seniors. Whether it's exchanging backpacks for briefcases or leaving 
Boston for Europe, it's always scary to have to face the real world, no longer having the 
comfort of Boston College watching out for you. However, counteracting that fear is 
the excitement of moving forward and beginning a new phase of life. Boston College 
has formed a strong foundation for every senior, on top of which they will be able to 
build successful lite experiences. It has given each of them the education, life lessons, 
and confidence that will enable them to succeed in whatever they put their minds to. 
Without a doubt, the class of 2005 will take on their new challenges as ambitiously 
as they did four years ago in embarking upon the very journey they now have to end. 



Starting jobs at the John Hancock building! 




^:irah Camirc 



N;it;ilK- Surnck, I 'nrnlnn|uc MIIIlt, C.'liris Chiiwnjf, ;irul Amy M 



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A Ik 1,1 True, Sarah Curley, Xlioium kerb, ,iiilI C,',iitliii Rili\ 



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Casey Girardi and Krysta Fiorillo 



Maureen Traynor, Becca Hurst, Christy Slavik, anJ M,iii,i l\.ijn;4 



Vanessa Hamblet 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Shara Hammond 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Tyler Hancock 

School of Management 

Economics 



Helen Hang 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Matthew Hanlon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 




Edward Hansen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Ryan Harmon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Lindsay Harrington 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Emily Harding 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Elizabeth Hardner 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Emily Hardy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Michael Harper 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



Catherine Harrington 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Cynthia Harrington 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



I'aigu I iarringliin 
School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resources Mgmt 



Allison llcirt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Matthew Harl 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Emily Hardy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 




Erin Harrington 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 




Brooke Hartmann 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Timothy Harvey 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



William Harvey 

School of Management 

Finance 

Corporate Reporting & Analysis 



Elizabeth Hassan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 



Katherine Hause 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Lauren Haverly 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math/Computer Science 




Sarah Hawes 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Christopher Hawk 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Pfiilosophy 



Tara Hayden 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Cliristopher Haydon 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Matthew Hays 

School of Management 

Finance 

I >,uh.ini> 




Kaya Hazard 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Kerry Healey 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Katherine Healy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Thomas Heaney 

School of Management 

General Mgmt 

Finance 



Brittany Hebb 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Damelle 1 ledderson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Brien Hedstrom 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Victoria Hellen 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Michael Hemak 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Lauren Hemenetz 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Kathryn Henry 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



David Herman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communications 



Katherine Herod 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Lauren Hess 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Matthew Hess 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Sociology 




Spencer Heydt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Kelly Hickman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

English 



Geoffrey Higginbotham 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Daniel Higgins 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Sean Hightower 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Commvmications 




Brian Hill 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Jonathan Hill 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Shila Hill 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Noelle HiUer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Justin Hillyard 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Political Science 




.'.■ ndy Hinckley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Cominuni cations 



brigid I lintcrbcrger 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



LrikHirs 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Icnnilrr I lir-^ih 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Jrssi' I ioclikc'ppel 

School of Management 

Sociology 



^■^imstz. V- 





Andrew Hodgens 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kendall Hoekstra 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Denise Hoffecker 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Richard Hoffmann 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Mary Hogan 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Brae Holdridge 
School of Management 

Finance 
Corp Report & Analysis 



Burnell Holland 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Political Science 



Elizabeth HoUinger 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Economics 



Nicole Holt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jacqueline Horan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Sarah Horowitz 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Ariana Horton 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Courtney Hovey 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Tara Hovey 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kyra Howell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 



Collcun Hughes 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Kathryn Hogan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Eileen Holmes 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Catherine Hough 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Joseph Hummel 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




nilv Patterson. Rcncc Tobia^scn. Kim Gi^'nccl, Maria Domestico, Tara Shancs-Hcmandu: 



Jackie Rada, Molly Stofen, and Lindsey Eiilhort; 

mar-- 




Jcnni l-cs|je. Chiirt PfFilippis. K:ite Henry. ;md Elizabeth Reeves 




Diana FairchilJ, Meghan CVjuj^hLTiy, Cheryl Ricthcs, Genevieve l)oerr, M 




Lindsey Fairweather, Qiity Stevens, Kristin Goddard, Laina Ceddia, and Erin Docherty 




Michael Hundgen 

School of Management 

Finance 



Sharon Hunley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Christian Hunt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Doyle Hunt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Comp Sci A & S B.S 



Matthew Hunt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Samuel Huntley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Comp Sci A & S B.S 



Meghan Hurley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Rebecca Hurst 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Justin Huvelle 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History 



Andrew Hymas 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 

Philosophy 




Stephanie lannucci 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Chizoba Ibeabuchi 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Christopher Ignaciuk 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jehangir llahi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



William Imbriale 

School of Arts & Sciences 

!< empty 




Roberto Impeduglia 


Andrew InnocenLI 


Matthew Inscrra 


C lari.' In/L'ii 


1 lu'ology 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


John lorio 


Economics 


History 


Economics 


English 


School of Management 


Theology 








Finance 



Diana Isern 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Frances Izzo 

School of Management 

Finance 



Catherine Jackson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Geoffrey Jacobson 

School of Management 

Economics-CSO 

Finance 



Matthew Jacobson 

School of Management 

Finance 




Megha Jain 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Silja Jcimes 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Physics 

History 



Jessica Jamison 
School of Nursing 

Nursinc; 



Patrick Jang 

School of Management 

Finance 



Benjamin Janse 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 




Lindsay Jansen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Carlos Jaramillo IV 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Kathryn Jefferis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Ashley Jefferson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Eun Jo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 




Emily Job 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Sujit John 

School of Management 

Finance 

Theology 



Foster Johns 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theater Arts 



Alycia Johnson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Christopher Johnson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

History 



Jessica Johnson 

School of Education 

Elementan' Education 

English (LSOE) 



Philip Johnson 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 



American Heritages 

Jessica Johnston 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Eugene Joly 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Kayley Jones 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Ryan Jones 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Suzanne Jones 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Mia Joo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jhonathan Joseph 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 



Daniel Joyce 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 





Matthew Joyce 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Courtney Judge 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Elementary' Education 



Krystal Juncosa 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Alexander Jung 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Music 



Travis Kahn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 




\ora Kaleshian 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Adam Kalt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



I'juline Kani 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kathleen Kane 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Michael Kane 

School of Management 

Finance 




Blair Kanis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Robert Kao 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Dante Kappotis 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Alison Karniski 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Dax Kartson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Nevi Kasa 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Susan Kaye 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Romance Lang-French 



Eileen Kelleher 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Christopher Kaster 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Agnes Kasule 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Anne Kawalerski 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communications 



Emily Keane Laura Kebel 

School of Arts & Sciences School of Management 

International Studies Information Systems 

Operations & Strategic Management 



Brian Keegan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Virginia Kelley 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Brendan Kells 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Bronwen Kelly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Katherine Kayatta 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Jonathan keephart 

School of Management 

Finance 




Christopher Kelly 

School of Arts &: Sciences 

Philosophy 



Seniors 




McK [>«J«hctlv. Cut Ennlcr, Alltvm H;in. Elinht-th Trc;uJ:iw:iv, Becky Mm*-!. Arti-inJ;i Lilic;irn. Suhh;i B;iiin 



Inn ll..rvcv;.nJKich B.m ■ l 




Kcititf Koruela, Li^a Mahtmey, Danielle Gitlitz, and Erin McKay 




Kate Noonan, anJ Grttchcn ( iil 



I u \ ,r K,„i,,. I iiuKiA Hiillvrt;. Mollv Si,.|cn, ;ukI Ami\ ( . 




Geoffrey Roy, Ed Clo, and Owen Christensen 



Senioi 




Thomas Kelly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Jessica Keneison 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Edward Kennedy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



John Kennedy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

History 



Kristen Kennedy 
School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resources Mgmt 




Elizabeth Kenney 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



James Kenney 

School of Management 

Finance 



Timothy Kenny 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Andrea Kenyon 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Laura Kenyon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Enghsh 

Communications 





mMM, 




Hilary Kerner 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Elizabeth Kerrigan 

School of Education 

Math /Computer Science 

Elementary Education 



Colleen Kiesel 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jihun Kim 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Peter Kim 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Sar • • 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Yoona Kini 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Colin KjndgrLMi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



ChrisUiphcr King 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Mobhiin Kinliii 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Madonna Kinne 
School of Education 
Human Development 
Hispanic Experience 



Elisabeth Kirby 

School of Management 

Finance 



Lane Kirkpatrick 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Emilie Kitts 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Elisa Kjeldsen 

School of Management 

Marketing 




DarienRae Klarman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Mathematics 



Rebekka Klausen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biocheniistrv 



Maryellen Klein 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Erin Kline 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Emily Klopper 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Benjamin Knappmiller 

School of Management 

Economics-CSOM 



Brian Knowles 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Alexander Ko 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Natalie Kocher 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Theology 



Selma Koita 

School of Arts c& Sciences 

Economics 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 




Adam Kolick 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Classics 

Theology 



Briana Kolodziej 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Jennifer Kolucki 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Adam Koneman 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Philosophy 



Cabrielle Koo 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Veronica Korb 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Communications 



Katherine Koruda 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Brian Koscuiszka 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Math /Computer Science 



Nicole Kouroubacalis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Dyan Kozaczka 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 




Llinstopher Krall 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Physics 

Philosophy 



Kirstin Kramer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Marguerite Kranick 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Eva Krauss 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Megan Krauss 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Katharine Kreinbring 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Steven Krikorian 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Michael Krueger 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Ann Kryzanek 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Christian Kubic 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 




fimothy Kuck 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Mathew Kuhnmuench 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kern Kulesza 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Kupa Kumar 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Erin Kushi 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Michael Kusner 


MaryChristine Kwiatek 


Theresa L'Abbate 


Todd Labbe 


Michal Lada 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


Finance 


Psychology 


Elementary Ed. 


Finance 


Biology 


Fronomics-CSOM 


Hispanic Studies 


Math /Computer Science 


English 






Kristen Lainis 

School of Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Mathematics 



Amanda Lalicato 
School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Matthew Lalone 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Eimear Lambe 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



School of Arts & Sciences 
Communications 



Chris Lam 

School of Management 

Finance 

Philosophy 



Kristy Lambrou 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Michael Lamonaca 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Fronomics 



Sandra Landeo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Bryan Landgraf 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Jeremy Landry 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Ashley Lane 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Katie Lamb 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theology 




Eric Landers 

School of Management 

Management 

Finance 




Jeffrey Lane 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Theology 




Kelly Lane 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Brian Langevin 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Information Systems 



Robert Langevin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Heather Laplante 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Paul Lapreziosa 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 




Joseph La Rocca 

School of Education 

Film Studies 

Arts & Science 



Catherine Larrabee 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Margaret Larsen 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Erica Larson 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources Management 



Emily Lattin 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child In Society 




Regina Lauricella 

School of Education 

Elementar)' Education 

English (LSOE) 



Gregory Lauze 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Cailin Lavallee 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Katherine Lave 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Nathan Laverriere 
School of Management 

Finance 
Corp Report & Analysis 





A^^^^ 




Elizabeth Lavin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Arthur Law 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Computer Science A & S B.S 



William Lavvrie 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Micliellc Lavvson 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgnmt 



Richard Lawson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Theater Arts 



Matthew Lawton 

School of Management 

Finance 



Christopher Layden 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Taylor Leahy 

School of Management 

Finance 



Casey Leber 

School of Management 

Finance 



Daniel Leber 

School of Management 

Finance 




Allison Le Blanc 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Philosophy 



Nicole LeClair 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Renee Ledoux 

School of Arts & Sciences 
Psychology 



Ahrcum Lee Ariel Lee 

School of Arts & Sciences School of Management 

Psychology Operations /Tech MgmtPolitical 

Science 




Daniel Lee 

School of Management 

Info Systems 



Dwight Lee 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 



Everett Lee 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Hana Lee 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Music 



Jung Mi Lee 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Katherine Lee 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Patrick Leeman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Classics 



Daniel Lefebvre 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jay Lee 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 




Courtney Legath 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 




. nnifer Chariot, Nancy White, Stephanie Salgado, and Tanesha Barnes Sue Mulready, Emily Lattin, Rebekah Cain, Alison Dohcrty, Juss Meistcrman, and Shannon Garvey 




Meghan Leiby 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jennifer Leslie 

School of Management 

Accounting 



David Lemoine 
School of Management 

Information Systems 
Operations / Tech Mgmt 



Erin Lenahan 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Jonathan Lennon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Laura Lenth 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Adam Letize 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Brendan Levine 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Ashleigh Levison 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Rebecca Levy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Desmon Lewis 

School of Management 

Finance 



Rachel Leyland 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Amber Li 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Diana Li 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Xin (David) Li 

School of Management 

Finance 




Christopher Liberti 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Philosophy 



School of Arts & Sciences 
Political Science 



Kevin Lichlcnborg 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Emily Lilly 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Ching-1 Isucli Lin 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Nina Lin 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Michael Lincoln 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Richard Lind 

School of Management 

Marketing 



John Linden 

School of Management 

Information Systems 



Joanna Lippert 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Histor)' 



Matthew List 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Richard Lister 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Katherine Litrocapes 
School of Education 

Child In Society 
Human Development 



Tina Lius 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Christain Lizarbe 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Social Sciences 



Priscilla Lloyd 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Christine Lobo 

School of Management 

General Mgmt 

Marketing 



Alexander Lockwt)od 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Andrew Logan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Comp Sci A & S B.S 



Elizabeth Logan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Erica Lombardo 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Megan Linnemeier 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Joni Littleton 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Andrew Locke 

School of Management 

Finance 




Allyson Long 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Seniors I 



Madeline Long 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theatre Arts 



Sue Looney 

School of Management 

Corporate Systems 



Angel Lopez 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Gregory Lorenzo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

History 



Makaine Lozandieu 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Joseph Lucci 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Briana Lugo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Connor Lundy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Brendan Lynch 

School of Management 

General Mngmt In School of 

Management 



John Lynch 

School of Management 

Finance / Operations / Tech Mgmt; 

Accounting / Inf Tech 




KeUy Lynch 


Jenny Lynn 


Giao Mac 


Joy Mac Dougall 


Kati Mac Gregor 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Nursing 


Accounting 


Communications 


History 




Daniel Macisaac 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Erin Mackay 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Brendan Mac Kenzle 

School of Management 

Accounting 



I iionuis Mjckor 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communicalions 



Christine Mac Masler-Ho 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Aili MacNally 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Courtney Maciigan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kerri Magee 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Kimberly Magee 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Political Science 



Kelly Maher 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Andrew Mahoney 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Anne Mahoney 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Lisa Mahoney 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Sara Mailander 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Elaine Mak 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Film Studies 



Joseph Makley 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History (LSOE) 



Kelly Makovich 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Economics 



Sumit Mallick 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Sean Malloy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Kelly Malone 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Corey Manchester 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Rebecca Magnone 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communications 




Suzanne Mahony 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Kyle Malesra 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Haley Mancini 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Theater Arts 




Gregory Pavlov needs a break! 



"Senioritis is a malfunction in your decision-making agencies, 
making you capable of blatantly ignoring responsibilities and 
leaving you fearless towards all consequences. Your body follows 
without question, reaching for any and every sign of good company 
and a good time. The best part is, senioritis is contagious - even 
without words, a simple conniving smile will do the trick in 
convincing a fellow senior to drop everything and just enjoy lifer 

- Eun Jo 




"It is really tough to 
concentrate when you 
know that it is your 
last year and you just 
want to be spending 
time with your friends. 
When it comes down to 
deciding between doing 
homework and going 
out, it's hard to make 
the academic choice!' 
- Rochelle Schneider 




Joel Tejada 



Seniors Fight to 
Fight Senioritis 

It can hit at any time, whether it be just before final exams or just before the first day of classes. It's that sense of slothfulness that 
creeps into the brains of seniors and paralyzes them from caring about anything remotely academic. Manifesting itself in many forms, 
it includes constant television watching, extreme partying, or everyone's personal favorite: falling asleep at the library. While one 
: kind of senioritis is caused by the laziness of embracing the end of homework and exams prematurely, another kind deals with the fear 
of entering the real world the following year and thus the desire to try to live it up as much as possible before real responsibility sets in. 
Whatever the causes, one recurring symptom of senioritis is the absolute lack of desire to do any type of "work," as many seniors are ending 
their lives as students forever. Instead of studying for that huge history test Tuesday night, many seniors will be seen partying at The 
ilKells. Rather than work on that final paper, others will be caught watching old re-runs on MTV they've seen 25 times, or perhaps more 
honorably, having fallen asleep at the library in earnest attempt to work. No senior is safe from this highly contagious disease. Having 
become such an epidemic here at Boston College, it has left many to wonder, could there be any cure? The class of 2005 hopes not. 




"It is dangerous 
when you begin 
in September 
with the motto 
"Live it like it's 
Senior Week all 
year long!" 
- Veronica Korb 




Casfy Mullen, Kelly Maher, Carrie McCabe, and Ingrid Wulcryn 




Sarah Curlcy, Caiclin Riley, Alicia True, and Veronica K' 




Christina Sag;limheni and Nancy White 



Rpninrs 




Keriarm Mangan 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Stephanie Maniscalco 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Vanessa Mapula 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Courtney Mara 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Megan Mara 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 




Elizabeth Marangell 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Michelle Marchany 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Christine Marchese 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Dennis Marcickiewicz 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Joanna Marino 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Laura Marino 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Adam Markey 

School of Management 

Computer Science-A & S 

Mgmt Info S\'Stems CSOM 



Lane Marmon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Stephanie Marquis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Lauren Marra 

School of Management 

Economics-CSOM 




Kyan Vlarsn 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Carolyn .Vlartin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Joseph Marlinez 

School of Management 

Finance 

Human Resources 



Kathleen Martinez 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Natalia Martinez 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Linguistics 




Margot Martino 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Heather Matheson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Marissa Matteo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Anne Maxwell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 




Christina Mayer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Jason Mayer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Emily MazzuUa 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Carolyn McCabe 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Joseph Mayerle 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



David Mazza 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Courtney Mazzone 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



James Mazzuto 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Samuel McArdle 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 



Sean McAvoy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Film Studies 



Peter Mazzone 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Meredith McBride 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Communications 




Douglas McCafferty 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Film Studies 



Christine McCarthy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Christine McCarthy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Keith McCarthy 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Seniors 




Preston McCaskill 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Trevor McCourt 
School of Management 

Finance 
Corp Report & Analysis 



Erin McCutcheon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art Histor\' 

English 



.^ 



Jeffrey McClain 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 



Elizabeth McCleary 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Brittany McCormick 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

English 



Eamon McCormick 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Chris McCoy 
School of Management 

Finance 
Corp Report & Analysis 



Ian McCready 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Michael McCuUough 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Lynne McCumber 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Kathleen McDermott 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English (LSOE) 



Ashley McDonald 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Meghan McDonald 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Sandra McDonald 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Annemarie McDonough 

School of Management 

Finance 



Susan McCee 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Andrew McGlynn 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Kevan McGovem 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



KoiA Mt I .' ''. '■! It 

School ol Ai 1^ .V ^i K'lHc^ 

Political Science 



Gavin McGrath 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Katie McGrath 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Bryan McGuinness 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Eric Mclntyre 

School of Management 

Finance 



Christopher McKinley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 

Political Science 



Kathryn McKinley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Andrew McKinnon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Melanie McKinnon 

School of Management 

Marketincr 



Anne McLaughlin 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Cara McLaughlin 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History (LSOE) 



James McLaughlin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Sean McLaughUn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Justin McLean 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Patricia McMahon 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History (LSOE) 



AlexjnJij \U\Kinama 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Colleen McManama 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Human Resources 



Eileen McKeever 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 




Noreen McLane 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Historv 



( onimiinuMli 




Taryn McLaughlin 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 




Meghan McManama 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Michelle Daly, Kristin Goddard, and Erin Dohenv 



^iL-ph l;innucci, Ik-tsy R;ulrke, Keyina l.auracclhi, Kate Walsh, aiul Kerri Ma(;ee 




Carly Frasur, K.inc Foley, and lessie Rosen 



Sarah Camire, Flizaheth Ree\ es, I oiinrK a Srrong, Carolyn Rock, and Kate Henry 




Emily Lattin, Shannon Garvey, Alison Doherty, Rebekah Cain, and Sue Mulready 




lura Kehel and Luci Posillico 





i 




Joel Tejada, Casini Peralta, Adamo Becerra, and Joanne SaKlimbeni 



Seniofs po^ 



Courtney McManus 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Philosophy 



Lindsay McMurray 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English (LSOE) 



Maria McNamara 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Katherine McShane 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Alexander McShiras 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 

History 




Sarah McSvveeney 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



John Mcweeney 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Andrew Meagher 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Tara Mechrefe 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Christopher Meehan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Jennifer Meek 

School of Education 

Elementar)' Education 

Child In Society 



Kimberly Mehl 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Sara Mehltretter 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

PolitirnI Science 



Julie Mehne 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Jessica Meisterman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Guy Melamed 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Eileen Melli 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Christopher Mello 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Operations & Strategic Mgmt 



Matthew Meloni 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Communications 



Joseph Mcndcs 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 





I^'IH 



Tamy-Fee Meneide 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Michael Messina 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



^li 



Matthew Meringolo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Valerie Merisier 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Alison Merrill 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Nicole Messmer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Neil Meulener 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Amy Meyer 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jonathan Messier 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Charles Michna 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Joseph Miele 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Human Resources Mgmnt 



Jennifer Mihal 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Mary Mihalko 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Melissa Mihos 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Aoife Millar 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Thomas Millar 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Alexander Millard 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Allison Miller 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Stephanie Miles 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Christopher Miller 

School of Education 

Human Development 



«■&. /"l^ 








A^d 




Dana Miller 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Uomimque Miller 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Elizabeth Miller 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Daniel Milligan 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Barry Mills 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Heather Minnich 

School of Management 

Finance 

Communications 



Brian Misasi 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Sheila Misra 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Mark Mistovich 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Melissa Mita 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child In Society 




Christine Mitchell 


Amy Molden 


Matthew Monaghan 


Charles Mondora 


Michael Montani 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


Computer Science-A & S 


International Studies 


Finance 


Economics 


Finance 




Ashlic Monteiro 


Li.iiu MunlruHL' 


Kathryn Mooney 


\kinK|Uc Miiorc 


/\nnc MiHisL'f 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Nursing 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Communications 


Nursing 


Communications 


Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 


Sociology 






Hispanic Studies 


History 




Jennifer Moquin 

School of Management 

Economics-CSOM 

Marketing 



Michael Morganti 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Jennifer Mosesian 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Katherine Mueller 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Tiori 



John Moral 

School of Management 

Accounting 



James Moran 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Psychology 



Stephen Morelli 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Veronica Morgan 

School of Education 

Human Development 




Devin Morris 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Jeremy Morrison 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Kerrie Morrison 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



David Mosca 

School of Management 

Mathematics 

Fin.iiu I' 




Darci Motoki 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Philosophy 




LciLireii X'lounbe) 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Linguistics 



Colin Moynihan 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Michael Mucciolo 

School of Management 

Finance 




Dennis Mulgrew 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Casey Mullen 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Communications 



Christine Mulligan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Susan Mulready 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Spninrs 







i "^^^^^^^^^^1 


1 




Jessie Rosen, Rob Swenson, Katie Foley, and Carly Fraser 




■^ r 



Wm 1!*^ 



y 



i' 



C 



?r<"^ 




l£: 



-.-.♦»■'■■ 



Mjrk Sw itaj, Amanda Lallicato, Darrel Swann, Meghan Dougerty, Colleen Walker, Steph Bissonnette, Alison Hart, Ryan Stephenson, Li:: Treadaway, peter Gartland, and Janu B.ihi' 




Sue Mulrcady, Jay Bischof, Omar Tanvir, and Emily Liittm 



N.iriev While 




Hrag Hamalian and Erin Reilly 



The ^irls in Parma. Italy! 



■Spninrs 




Meredith Mulvaney 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Rafael Munoz 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jennifer Murillo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Joseph Muro 

School of Management 

Economics-CSOM 

Finance 



Colleen Murphy 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

English (LSOE) 




Douglas Murphy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Edmond Murphy 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 



Jennifer Murphy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Kaitlyn Murphy 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Michelle Murphy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Ryan Murphy 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Kiely Murray 

School of Management 

Operations /Tech Mgmt 

Marketing 



William Murray 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Rebecca Musso 

School of Education 

Human Development 

MSW 



Marissa Myatt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Lncd Myruski 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Stephen Naclerio 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jennifer Nance 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Kathryn Napolitano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Alexander Nary 
School of Management 

Finance 
Human Resources M*gmt 



Mark Nasser 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Natasha Nathan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang-French 



Elizabeth Neary 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Sarosh Nentin 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Samantha Nessralla 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Christine Neu 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Eric Newman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Philip Nicosia 

School of Management 

Finance 

Mathematics 



Thomas Neufeld 

School of Management 

Finance 

English 



Nilva Neves 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Kevin Newell 

School of Management 

Finance 



David Newton 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Anthony Nguyen 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Trang Nguyen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Douglas Nidzgorski 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Christopher Noble 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Christopher Nofi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Nicholas Newhall 
School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resources Mgmt 




William Nichols 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Caitlin Nolan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Seni 



r«i- 



i 



'b 





Hannah Nolan-Spohn 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Environment Geosdence 



Jeffrey Nonnenkamp 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Accounting 



Christopher Noon 

School of Management 

Finance 



James Noonan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Kathleen Noonan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Robert Norberg, Jr. 

School of Management 

Finance 



Mark Norcini 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Fnance 



Daniel Northrop 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Jennilci .\LH\ak 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Justin Nowell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 




Stephen Oben 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Bradley O'Brien 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Bridget O'Brien 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Daniel O'Brien 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Eamoiui O'Brien 

School of Management 

Finance 




John O'Brien 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Niarianna (.Acniuz/i 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

History 



hli/dbfthcrciinnfll 

School of Education 

Human Development 

History (LSOE) 



Lindsay O'Connell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Moira O'Connell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jonathan Ofria 
School of Management 
General Management 



Brian O'Hara 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Matthew O'Hara 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Jesse Ohrenberger 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Communications 



Sarah O'Hurley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Chiazor Okagbue 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Erin O'Leary 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Scott 0'Lear\ 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Philosophy 



Thomas O'Leary 

School of Management 

Computer Information Systems 



Eduardo Oledan 

School of Management 

Business Administration 

Economics-CSOM 




Kara Oliver 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Charles O'Malley 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Kevin O'Malley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 

Philosophy 



Emory O'Mealia 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Art History 



James O'Meara 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Film Studies 




Courtney Omsted 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Erin O'Nei 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jaime Onofre 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Hispanic Studies 



Ryan O'Regan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Erin O'Reilly 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math / Computer Science 



Andrea O'Rourke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Matthew O'Rourke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Jennine Orphanides 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Kristen Orr 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Joel Ortiz 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 




Keri O'Sullivan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Kristen Ozycz 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



August Pabst 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Elizabeth Pabst 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Sarah Paladino 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Kia Palmer-Sherwood 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Deepa Pamidimukkala 

School of Management 

Finance 



Christos Papapetrou 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

I'liilosophy 



Katerina Paparsenos 

School of Management 

Finance 



Emilia Pappas 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

English 




bctJOitian I'aquette 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Ucbra Pare 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 

Human Resources Mgmt 



Coral Parikh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Clirislina I'arisi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Philosophy 



Ldward Park 

School of Education 

Human DevelopmiMil 

Theology 




Kimberlee Parkins 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Communications 



Carolina Parodi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Criminal Justice 

School Of Advancing Studies 



Jeffrey Parros 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



F. Amy Pattavina 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Emily Patterson 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Charles Paul 
School of Management 

Marketing 
Information Systems 



Julie Pellegrini 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Ann Perrin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Gregory Pavlov 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Comp Sci A & S B.S 



Scott Pearson 

School of Management 

Finance 



Genevieve Peeples 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Emily Pell 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 




Machael Pelosi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Julienne Penza 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Sociology 



Elena Pereira 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Hispanic Studies 



Jennifer Perone 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Theology 




Christopher Pesce 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Political Science 



Sabrina Peter 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

English 



Jessica Petersen 

School of Management 

Finance 



Michael Petit 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 




.~ti| li nil' I iiiiiim 1 .ind Chrb Mu 




Molly Stofen, Lindsey Eulherg, Michelle' Sanders, Kelly Hickman, and Jackie Rad.i 



Mike Montani and Danielle Gitlitz 





<s> 



Katelyn Petralia 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Sonya Petri 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Richard Pevear 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Kristina Pflanz 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Kimberly Phair 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 




Patrick Phelan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Joshua Phelps 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Philosophy 



Kathryn Phillips 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Ryan Phillips 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Comp Sci A & S B.S 



Christopher Phung 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Currier Piatt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Matthew Pierson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

Philosophy 



Mariah Pihonak 

School of Management 

Finance /Information Systems/ 

Corp Report & Analysis 



Aretuza Pires 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Shenora Plenty 
School of Education 

Early Childhood 
Human Development 




Karolina Podlesna 


Kenneth Poggi 


laji) J I'uhl 


Carolyn Pohmcr 


Kcnec Polcaro 


ool of Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Arts & Sciences 


Communications 


Finance 


History 


Elementary Education 


Biology 


Economics 


Marketing 




Human Development 






Kristen PoUizzi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Quinton Porter 

Sdiool of Management 

Finance 



iNdthiinicl Poole 

School of Management 

Human Resources Mgmt 

Finance 



Liana Popkin 

School of Education 

Elementary EducationChild In 

Society /Hispanic Experience 



Michael I'orco 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Catherine Portner 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Lucia Posillico 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Crier Potter 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Llise Poremski 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




William Potter 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Matthew Powers 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Dominique Pradella 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

English 



Stephen Pratt 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Julie Predki 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Rachele Princiotto 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Daniel Pritchard 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Michael Protasewich 

School of Management 

Finance 

Corporate Reporting 



Ellen Pyzik 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theater Arts 

Communications 



David Preziosi 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Kimngoc Quach 

School of Management 

Accounting 




Caitlin Quinlan 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Bradford Quinn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Communications 



Elissa Quinn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 

Art History 



Gillian Quinn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Sarah Quintana 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 




Saba Qureslii 

School of Management 

Accounting 



slvma Rabinowich 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Amy Racanello 

School of Management 

Corp Report & Analysis 

Finance 



Grier Raclin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Jaclyn Rada 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Betsy Radtke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



John Rafferty 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Colleen Raleigh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Robert Rametti 
School of Education 
Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Christopher Randall 
School of Management 

Finance 
Corp Report & Analysis 




Genevieve Raseman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Eugene Raux 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 

Sociology 



Tracy Raveltu 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Kuberl Kay 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



brie Kecher 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Lisa Reddy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Michelle Reddy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 



Stephen Reenock 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Elizabeth Reeves 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Erin Reilly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Joseph Reilly 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Historv 



Thomas Reilly 

School of Management 

Finance 



Thomas Reinecke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Commvinications 




m A 



Anais Resseguier 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Abigail Rethore 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Flora Reyes-Jimenez 

School of Management 

Finance / Marketing 

Philosophy 



Courtney Reynolds 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Jacqueline Rho 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Christina Riccio 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Julia Rice 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Robert Rich 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



David Regan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Jennifer Remis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




John Reynolds III 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

History 




Peter Richards 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



The friendships I have made 
at Boston College will last a 
lifetime. The stories we share 
and the experiences we have 
had.,, they will never be for- 
gotten. 

- Barbara Gallo 




Elisabeth Marangell and Elizabeth Amento 



Losing the housing lottery 
and getting the worst hous- 
ing every time doesn't matter 
when you do it with great 
friends! Friends always have 
fun - whether its Newton, 
College Road, or Edmonds! 
It doesn't matter where you 
are but who youYe with! 

- Elizabeth Reeves 




in Malloy, Garth Swenstn, Knb IVIandcrs, and Rich Bucolc 





Rupa Kumar, Marisa Brown, Monica Suarez, Rochelle Schneider, Kristen Faucetta, and Saya Dempsey 

Friends 
Forever 



Moving away from home for the first time, leaving your family and high school 
friends, and knowing no one except for the handful of students you met at 
orientation can be a very intimidating situation. But throughout the first 
semester of freshman year at Boston College - or even during orientation - many 
students built a support system and circle of friends that will most likely last them the 
duration of their college experience. Graduating seniors can look at their friends in 
May of 2005 and see faces they have known all four years, as well as the faces of people 
they have met along the way. And not only do many friendships at Boston College 
last from start to finish, but they will most likely carry on into our adult lives as we go 
through life changes, start new jobs, get married, and have children. Boston College 
sets the foundation for friendships people will keep for a while, and while we cherish the 
times we had together during college, those good times will not end after graduation. 
Our friendships instead will continue to grow and mature for the rest of their lives. 



"Friendships at BC have changed a lot for 
me, but similar to high school I finally 
found good ones who I will always keep 
in touch with. Vm so thankful for that!' 

- Harper Yielding 



Spninrs 




, ; juti anJ Brian Duy^ ■!. 



■ L^Ij.lii 1 '.ai;;lii.ii',. M.iik I A'^.t, anJ Stcph BibsumictlL 




Emily Lattin, Anthony Mcmtciro, Natalie Serock, and Ashley Jefferson 



Erin Richardson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 

Theology 



Julie Richardson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre-Med 



Cheryl Riether 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Jenna Riis 

School of Arts &c Sciences 

Psychology 



Caitlin Riley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Robert Riley 

School of Management 

Finance 

Information Systems 



Sarah Rinehimer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Amanda Ring 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Peter Ringlee 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

History 



John Ristuccia 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 




Joseph Ritacco 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Leah Riviere 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



James Rizzolo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

En£;lish 



Deborah Robb 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Darcy Roberts 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Biology 




Mark Robinson 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Carolyn Rock 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Nicholas Rodrigues 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Alexandra Rodriguez 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Eric Rodriguez 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Maria-Paz Rodriguez 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Daniel Rodriguez-Sains 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Katarzyna Rogala 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Caitlin Rolfes 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Alexandra Rolin 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elomentarv Educati(^n 




Stephen Ronan 

School of Management 

Information Systems 



Joseph Roos 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Jillian Ropar 

School of Mjinagement 

Accounting 



Aaron Rose 

School of Management 

Mathematics 

Accounting 



Courtney Rose 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Timothy Rose 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jessica Rosen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Patrick Ross 

School of Management 

Finance 



Alexis Rossi 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



William Rossy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Joseph Rotondi 

School of Management 

Finance 



Molly Rotsch 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Brendan Rourke 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Brian Roy 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Geoffrey Roy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Trevor Rozier-Byrd 

Sdiool of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Theology 



Megan Ruane 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Keri Rubeis 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Study 



Katelyn Rubert 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Grace Rubin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 




Alexandra Russell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Christopher Russo 

School of Management 

Finance 



Mark Russo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Beth Rutolo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Tracey Ruzbarsky 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 




Colm Ryan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Histor\' 



Emily Ryan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Gail Ryan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Helen Ryan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



John Ryan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Michael Ryan 


Paige Ryan 


Patrick Ryan 


Joiin Rybicki 


Stephen Sadlak 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Science 


Finance 


Psychology 


Marketing 


Political Science 


Economics 


Marketing 






Communications 





Christina Saglimbeni 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Sundeep Salmi 

School of Management 

Finance 

Computer Science 



Michael Saign 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Sara Sairitupa 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Sociology 



Agata Sajkiewicz 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 




Lauren Sakai 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Stephanie Salgado 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Daniel Saltus 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jeremy Salupo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Christine Sama 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

\1UMC 




David Samikkannu 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Katy Sammartano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Erin Sanborn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Lauren Sanchez 
School of Management 

Marketing 
Human Resources Mgmt 



Kerri Sanders 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




Michelle Sanders 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Michael Sangalang 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Communications 



Katherinc Saimdois 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Elizabeth Savino 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Eric Scaduto 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




le Granville, Elirabcth, S:aho, and Michelle ReJdy 



Owen Christensen, ( ' i-.i\ I ilxr. .mil Joe RoronJi 




hrUtine Gilbert, Jess Mtisttrman, Amy Molden, Emily bittin, and Joanna Marinci 




Erin Docherty, Michelle Daly, Cairy Ste\'en^, Oilli.tn Quinn, Kristin Goddard, and Laiii.i C \ddia 




•<xJ, Andrea Schulcr, Rob Ramctci, and Erin Wohl 



i ,1. I.f, ,n, -„,,l,l;,i,.l u,l I 




Mike HunJncn .uid Jessie Rosen 



Michael Scahill 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Katie Scally 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Lindsey Scardino 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Enfrodisia Schaff 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

School Of Advancing Studies 



Kelly Schaffer 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Christopher Scheinberg 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Matthew Schiavo 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Matthew Schimming 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



James Schiro 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



David Schmidt 

School of Management 

Finance 




Rochelle Schneider 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Andrea Schuler 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Paul Schuler 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Maria Schweitzer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Andrew Sclama 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Michael Scollan 

School of Management 

Finance 



Michael Scopelliti 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Kate Scotl 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Christopher SciilK 

School of Managenienl 

Finance 

Marketing 



Jennifer Scully 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 





St'da Sean 

Scliool of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 

History 



Lauren Seery 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Heidi Seidewand 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Natalie Serock 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Tara Shanes-Hernandez 
School of Education 

Early Chilcihood 
Human nL'\olopment 



Sami Sharif 

School of Management 

Finance 

Computer Science 



Kevin Shatzkin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

I listory 



Daniel Shaw 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 



Christie Shay 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Katie Shean 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Pre-Law 



Blythe Shepard 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Biology 



Melissa Sherman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Shenil Shah 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Ali Shawaf 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Michael Sherry 

School of Management 

Economics 




Lisa Shontell 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 



Joshua Shteierman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Philip Simbajon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Grace Simmons 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Daniel Simoes 

School of Management 

Operations /Tech Mgmt 

Accounting 




Elaine Simon 


Sean Sittambalam 


iVlauran Sivanantlian 


Alex Skandalis 


Thomas Skenderian 


Sdiool of Nursing 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


Nursing 


Economics 


Biology 


Accounting 


Communications 




Robin Skor\' 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



R Louis Skowyra 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Michael Skvasik 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Physics 

Philosophy 



Mary Slavik 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang-French 



George Smiltins 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Brian Smith 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Histor)' 



Dana Smith 

School of Management 

Finance 



Lindsay Smith 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Rachel Smith 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Kristen Snuck 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




Heather Sokolower 


Yumi Son 


Sung Song 


blephanie Sotomayor 


Jacob SouniuTai 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


History 


Finance 


Economics 


Psychology 


Biology 


Communications 


Accounting 









Catherine Spatola 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Mary Ann Speidel 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Heather Speller 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Andrew Spillane 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Dave Spina 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 




ESS!!5^i^Besafi^S^S;^^^ 




mmh 




Nicholas Spina 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Gregory Stachura 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 



Nicholas Spinello 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Laura Spokas 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

American Heritages 



Caitlin Sprague 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology A & S B.A 



Scott Sprinkel 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 




Emily Stanger 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Theology 



Paige Stapp 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Morgan Statton 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Jason Steen 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Communications 




William Steere 


Eric Stein 


Louis Steinberg 


Julie Stella 


Ryan Stephenson 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Arts & Sciences 


School of Education 


School of Management 


School of Arts & Sciences 


History 


Political Science 


Elementary Education 
Math /Computer Science 


Marketing 
Finance 


Mathematics 



Sen if 




Caitlin Stevens 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Wesley Stinson 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Environment Geoscience 



Colin St. Jolin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Carley St Lucia 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Thomas Stocker 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 




Molly Stofen 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Caroline St Onge 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Fowler Storms 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



Elizabeth Stowe 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



George Straehle 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Economics 




Michael Stratis 

School of Management 

Accounting 

General Mgmt 



Jonathan Strauss 

School of Management 

Finance CSOM 



Courtney Strong 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Katherine Stuebe 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Maria Suarez 

School of Management 

Finance 




Monica Suarez 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Saki Sugano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Economics 



Dong Suh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Both Sullivan 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Child In Society 



Dennis Sulliwiii 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



^s«> 







Kaitlin Sullivan 

School of Management 

Marketing 

Finance 



Patrick Sullivan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Ryan Sullivan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Susanne Sullivan 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 



David Sun 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 




Miguel Suro 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Darrel Swann 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



David Swanson 

School of Management 

Finance 



Joanna Svi^eeney 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Annie SweUa 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Music 




Garth Swensen 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Katherine Swenson 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Robert Swenson 

School of Management 

Economics 



Mark Switaj 

School of Management 

Information Systems 

Organizational Studies 



Elizabeth Szabo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Matthew Sztuk 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Laura Szu-Tu 

School of Management 

Marketing 



MinhTa 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Matthew Taglia 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Elizabeth Tampe 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Seniors 




M./:it|]Lr ^[cIlLT .in 1 ioMi r-<-ll\ 




Kelly Hickman, Carolyn Amoroso, Jackie Rada, and Molly Stoten 



Seninrs I 



Robert Tanguay 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 

English 



Omer Tanvir 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Luke Tarbi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Gregory Tarca 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Erin Taylor 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Matthew Taylor 

School of Management 

Finance 



Alex Temple 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Robert Terenzi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Laura Terlouw 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Kristen Terpenny 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 




Amy Terrill 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Brian Tevlin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



David Thayer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Karen Thayer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Christopher Therrien 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 




/\Udm i n(x^len 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Christopher Thomas 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



btanluy I homas 
School of Management 

Marketing 
Operations /Tech Mgmt 



liolli I hometz 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Mathevv Thompson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 




Ly Tieu 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Renee Tobiassen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Alicia Tildsley 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Mary-Allison Timby 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Physics 



Leigh Tinquist 

School of Management 

Finance 



Erin Tobin 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Peter Toepfer 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Sean Toland 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Historv 



Timothy Tiu 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




David Tollerud 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Shaun Tolson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Anthony Tomaro 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Paul Tomaszewski 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Christopher Tomecek 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Marisa Toomey 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Marissa Toomey 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Rachel Topham 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 



Christina Torres 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Communications 



Lauren loth 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Katherine Trainor 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Seninrs 




^ 



Lauren Trask 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Megan Treacy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Thomas Treacy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Elizabeth Treadaway 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Anne Trevethick 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




Nicole Trincellito 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Heidi Trockman 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Meghan Troy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Alicia True 

School of Management 

Finance 



Jane Tsamardinos 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Sociology 




Jeimifer Tsang 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Christopher Tsichlis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

Theology 



Chrisanthi Tsingos 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Political Science 



Anna Tudor 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Philosophy 



Melissa TuUy 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 




Timothy Tully 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Christine Tumanjan 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 



Moira Turner 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Finance 



Calhleen l\vard/ik 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Andrew- Tvveddlc 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

Mathematics 



Julie Tvvomcy 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Erika Tyler 

School of Management 

Economics-CSOM 

Finance 



Ua\ iti Lnibro 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Francis Ustach 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Kajalil Valiptiuj 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 

Philosophy 




Kathryn Valvano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Liam Van Loenen 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 

Art 1 listory 



Jacqueline Van Meter 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Christopher Van Wart 

School of Management 

Finance 

rronomifN-C^OM 



John Varanelli 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Arivee Vargas 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Dana Vartabedian 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Maksim Vasershteyn 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Elizabeth Vassallo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jacqueline Vega 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Marisa Ventura 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Daniel Vera 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Classics 



Alyssa Viano 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Lisa Vassallo 

School of Management 

Marketing 




John Vick 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Art History 



Jason Viger 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 

Economics 



Adam Vinhateiro 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Justin Virojanapa 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Psychology 



Christopher Vitale 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jenna Vona 

School of Education 

English (LSOE) 

Human Development/Theolog' 




Craig Vonahn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



TereSii \i>n Stamwitz 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Jakob Von Trapp 

School of Management 

Finance 



Brian Vozzella 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Brendan Vuolo 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 




David V'uong 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Nhi Vuong 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Robert Wabler 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 



Ryan Wade 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Studio Art 



Christina Wain 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Mathematics/Computer Scienc 




Katherine Waitc 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang-French 

Political Science 



Uouglas VVakc'ticId 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Grace VVakim 

School of Nursing 

Nursing 



Bradley VValbridge 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



\Kkk') U,ilc/)s/yn 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Chemistry 



Elizabeth Walker 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Dina Wall 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Kelly Wallenberg 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Andrea Waller 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Anne Walsh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Carolyn Walsh 

School of Management 

Finance 

Accounting 



Emily Walsh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Gregory Walsh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

rhiloMipIn 



Kate Walsh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Cuniniunii.\"ilions 



Kelly Walsh 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Human Development 




Mary Walsh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 



Torey Walsh 

School of Management 

Finance 



William Walsh 

School of Management 

General Mgmt 



Frank Walton 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Ellen Wang 

School of Management 

Marketing 




Julie Wang 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Lulu Wang 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Film Studies 



Alexandra Wappel 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Michael Ward 

School of Management 

Finance 



Sara Ward 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Spninrs 




Kadc H., 



Mully Siufcn, C;iri)lyn Anu>ri)S(i, and Jackie Rada 




Rochelle Schneider and Monica Su 



■Seninrs 



Laura VVarmenlioven 

School of Education 

Early Childhood 

Math / Computer Science 



Samantha Warner 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Lauren Washam 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Kelly Washington 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

English 



Patricia Wasiolek 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




James Watson 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Heidi Wattendorf 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

Psychology 



Natalie Watts 

School of Education 

Elementary Education 

Math /Computer Science 



Rakiya Watts 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Benjamin Webber 

School of Management 

Finance 

Economics-CSOM 




Adam Webster 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 

Arts & Science 



Lauren Weeks 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Elizabeth Weiler 

School of Management 

Finance 



Sabrina Weinstein 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



James Welch 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 




School of Management 
General Mgmt 



Maureen Welsh 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Kalelyn VVundull 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

History (LSOE) 



Qixiang Wong 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Tiffany Wernig 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 




Elana Western 

School of Management 

Marketing 



Clay Westrope 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Chace Wetzel 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Kimberly Wheaton 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Philosophy 



Nancy White 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 

English 



Tiffany White 
School of Education 
Human Development 



Robyn Wicks 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 

Rom Lang-Hispanic Studies 



Georg Wiese 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 

Theology 



Elizabeth Wilber 

School of Arts &: Sciences 

Art History 



Stephen Wilkie 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Alexis Williams 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Psychology 



Jason Williams 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Katharine Williams 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Elementary Education 



Robert Williams 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 

Political Science 



Sarah Williamson 

School of Management 

Finance 

Marketing 



Julia Wilson 

School of Management 

Accounting 



\Ji>^ 



AUyson White 
School of Education 
Human Development 
Hispanic Experience 




Tracy Wigfield 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 




Jazzmen Williams 
School of Education 
Human Development 




Angela Windy 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Environment Geoscience 



Sfilli 




Elizabeth Winkowski 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Courtney Withey 

School of Education 

Human Development 

English 



Michael Wlodarczyk 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communication 



Erin Wohl 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



Mark Wojtusiak 

School of Management 

Economics-CSOM 

Finance 




EUzabeth Wolf 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Sean VVondrack 

School of Management 

Finance 



Angela Wong 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Enghsh 

History 



Diana Wong 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Mathematics 



Farah Wong 

School of Arts & Sciences 

History 




Katie Wong 

School of Management 

Accounting 

Marketing 



Lisa Wong 

School of Management 

Accounting 



Joanna Wright 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 

French 



William Wright 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Political Science 



Jessica Wuebker 

School of Arts & Sciences 

German Studies 




John Wynne 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 



John Xeller 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Eliza Xenakis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Christina Xenides 

School of Arts Si Sciences 

International Studies 



David Yaccanno 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 





^^^%. 




Michael Yaksich 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Sociology 



Michael Yang 

School of Management 

Finance 



Gail Yeikiing 

School of Education 

Secondary Education 

English (LSOE) 



Henry Yi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

English 



Christine Yoo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Psychology 



Paul Yoon 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Philosophy 



Erica Young 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 

Political Science 



Travis Young 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Jennica Yu 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Romance Lang-French 



Paul Yu 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 



Brian Zaccheo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biochemistry 



Andrew Zak 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Lindsay Zanello 

School of Education 

Human Development 

Sociology 



Kelly Zanetich 

School of Arts &: Sciences 

Psychology 



Craig Zematis 

School of Arts & Sciences 

International Studies 



Paul Zentko 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Economics 



Meagan Yogi 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Theology 




Jacklyn Yovankin 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Human Development 




Jacob Zambrzycki 
School of Arts & Sciences 
Computer Science-A & S 




Matthew Ziparo 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Biology 




Nathan Ziv 

School of Arts & Sciences 

Communications 



Nina Zoclvoff 

School of Education 

Human Development 



Edward Zuppio 

School of Management 

Accounting 



"I can do no other than be rev- 
erent before everything that is 
called life. I can do no other than 
to have compassion for all that is 
called life. That is the beginning 

and the foundation of all ethics." 

' Albert Schweitzer 



In hiemoriam 



Christopher ]♦ Catanese 

July 6, 1983 -July 6, 2004 

For giving us so much to remember ^ 

touching our lives 

with your inimitable smile and laughter, 

thank you. 



Pope John Paul 11 

May 18, 1920 - April 2, 2005 

"I come as a pilgrim 

of love, 

of truth 

and of hope/' 



.Seniors 




t nsii I'tl.m:. l.;Mir:i C:irnil:irn, Amber Li, unJ Sheila MiM.i 




Superfans hanging out before the game! 



Seninrs 




Seninrs 




■c N'iKjnan, I'hil D'Alonio, anJ M . > . 



( liiisiinii Wain, AJ.iin KoiKTiii.in, .iikI C^hristin. 




Sfninrs 




Trang Nguyen, Alycia Johnson, Lauren Chrii-tic, Meghan Gorman, Sarah Gately, and Jess Cochrane 




M'iniL.i ~ . . : , ; Rupa Kum;i[ 



DarrL-l Swann 




Jessie Rosen, Carly Fraser, and a flock of eagles 



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Katie Mueller and Danielle Gitlitz 





Brian O'Hara and Ork 



K ,1,, 1 i.nii, Mil, |;. ,i,.indJ.KlvlilMnl 




Biihhy Ray and Aiisriii I 




Carrie McCabt Kelly Maher.EllzabclhDrlscolLCascyMu Ilea Kalle La mUand I ngrldWulczyii 









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JAMES ABELY 


MEGAN BARNES 


THOMAS BROWNLEE 


LISAADDORISIO 


MARLINE BARROS 


TIMOTHY BULMAN 


MEGHAAGGARWAL 


JEFFREY BASHAW 


ANDREW BURNS 


SEAN AHERN 


MATTHEW BATES 


WILLIAM BUSACKER 


MICHAEL AHERN 


CLEA BAUERSMITH 


COLIN CAFFREY 


SUN AHN 


ADAMO BECERRA 


JAMES CAHILL 


ALI AL SHAWAF 


BRIAN BENESTAD 


DANIEL CAJA 


KATHARINE ALLEGRA 


MEGAN BENSLEY 


XENIA CALDERON 

1 


ABIGAIL ALLEN 


THERESA BERKERY 


JEAN CALIXTE 


MATTHEW ALLEN 


JOHN BIRELEY 


JENNIFER CANESI 


BENJAMIN ALTLAND 


MEGAN BITTER 


MICHAEL CARSON 


ELIZABETH AMENTO 


MARI BLANES 


BRENNA CASEY |j 


NICOLE ANACLETO 


NATALIE BLAZER 


CIJI CASTRO 


SHERARANDALCIO 


TIMOTHY BLENNER 


CHRISTOPHER CATANESE 


ADRL\N ANDERSON 


VOJISLAV BOJOVIC 


JUNG-CCWON CHAE 


MARK ANDERSON 


JORGE BONETTI 


PHILIP CHAN 


JOHN ARBUCKLE 


LINDSAY BORDEAU 


CHRISTOPHER CHAN 


STEPHEN ARENA 


ANNE BOTICA 


JENNIFER CHEN 


AMARASHAR 


AMY BOYLE 


ANDREA CHEN 


MARIA AUCOIN 


KRISTYN BRANNIGAN 


LAN CHEN CHRIS CHIN 


RYAN AURORI 


MARC BRESLIN 


TODD CHING 


NICOLE BACHMAN 


MARY BRIDGES 


CAROL CHOI 


CHRISTINA BALLOU 


BENJAMEN BRINKERT 


GINNY CHOW 


TRACY BARAHONA 


JESSICA BRIZZOLARA 


LESLIE CHOY 


JOHN BARANELLO 


MICHELE BROCK 


KATE CHRISTIAN 


JOEL BARCIAUSKAS 


JOHN BROPHY 


KATHRYN CHUBRILO 


MOLLIE BARKER 


MARISA BROWN 


YHOHAN CHUNG 


TANESHA BARNES 


SHANNON BROWNE 


AI.VIN CINTRON 



BRYN CIRILLO 
RYAN CLANCY 
ASHLEY CLAUSS 
AMY CLEMENTE 
AARON COITE 
DIANA COLANGELO 
CHARLES COLETA 
RYAN COLLINS 
PATRICK CONLISK 
WILLIAM CONNELL 
JACQUELINE CONNOLLY 
SHANE CONNOR 
MICHAEL CONRAD 
ELIZABETH CONWAY 
JOSEPH COOPER 
SHANNON COPE 
DANIEL CORREIA 
EMILY COYNE 
ERIN CRAIG 
SLATER CRAM 
EDWARD CRANE 
NELL CURRAN 
CHRISTOPHER CURRERI 
THOMAS DADDARIO 
PHILIP D'ALONZO 
ELIZABETH DALY 




KRISTINA DE ROSA 
JOSE DEGWITZ 
ERIC DEICHMANN 
SUSANA DEL VALLE 
MARGARET DELGADILLO 
MICHAEL DERDERIAN 
CHRISLAIN DESROSIERS 
LOUIS DEVITO 
ASHLEY DI SCHINO 
BRIAN DIFFLEY 
JAMES DOMBROWSKI 
MARIA DOMESTICO ' ' 
BRENDAN DONAHUE 
JEAN DONICS 
COLIN DONOHOE 
MOLLY DONOVAN 
JAMES DORAN 
ELIOT DORAZIO 
CHRISTOPHER DORIA 
BRIAN DOYLE 
ALEXANDER DRUMMEY 
DANIEL DURAND 
KATHERINE ENGELS 
JOSE ESTEBAN 
JOHN EWING 
RICHARD FERRARI 




LISA FIELD 

MATTHEW FITZGERALD 
ADAM FITZGERALD 
GEOFFREY FLEMING 
RYAN FLEMING 
CAITLIN FOLEY 
GUILFORD FORBES 
MICHELE FRANGELLA 
EMILY FREY 
GABRIELA FULLON 
SEAN GAFFANEY 
HUGH GALLAGHER 
SARAH GATELY 
JAMIE GEIGER 
ERIK GEORGE 
LAURA GERATY 
DIANA GIBSON 
CHRISTINE GILBERT 
EVAN GLOVER 
RISHABH GODHA 
NAVROZE GODREJ 
KATHERINE GOLLON 
ALEXANDER GOMELSKY 
CHRISTINA GONZALEZ 
KIMBERLY GORDON 
ANN GORGA 










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STEPHEN GRAHAM 


AHRIN HUH 


SUHGENIE KIM 


CHARLES GRANDSON 


MARK HU 


JESSE KIRDAHY-SCALIA 


MICHAEL GREELEY 


JOCELYN HURLEY 


MATHIAS KIWANUKA 


IAN GREENWALT 


ANYA lOFFE 


TIMOTHY KLUG 


CHRISTOPHER HAAS 


CHRISTOPHER JACKSON 


GLORIA KNIGHT 


TERESA HAMM 


KYLEJAVES 


HEESEUNG KO 


GEORGE HANA 


ZACHARY JAZLOWIECKI 


DAVID KOHA 


ABIGAIL HANLON 


ANAICA JOSEPH 


ANDREW KONDRAT 


ALESSANDRA HAREWOOD 


MARTSYL JOSEPH 


SAMANTHA KORBEY 


PATRICE HARRISON 


REGINE JOSEPH 


JOHN KORPICS 


EDWARD HARRY 


MATTHEW JOURNALIST 


STEPHEN KOZA 


REHANUL HASSAN 


HANA JUNG 


ROSS KRENTZMAN 


NATHANAEL HASSELBECK 


CHARLES KALONZO 


RAYNA KUMAR 


CHRISTOPHER HATHY 


MATTI KALTIAINEN 


KATHERINE KWOH 


NOLAN HAVERN 


RAVI KALWANI 


ELIZABETH LA ROSE 


MEGHAN HAYES 


AMIN KAMRAN-RAD 


KARLA LABBE 


RAYMOND HENDERSON 


MARGARET KANG 


MELANIE LAHTONEN 


JENNIFER HENNING 


KRISTIN KANTIANIS 


JILLIAN LANDRY 


ALICIA HEREDIA 


ELENA KARLGUT 


TIMOTHY LARKIN 


ENA HILAIRE 


DOROTHEA KASTANAS 


MICHAEL LAVESON 


JESSICA HILB 


REBECCA KATZ 


BENJAMIN LAWRENCE 


ABBY HILLINGER 


BRENDAN KEMEZA 


PAUL LECHTENBERG 


LYDIA HODGE 


COLLEEN KENDRICK 


WONWOO LEE 


ERICA HOLLOT 


KATHRYN KEPPLE 


MIN LEE 


MARLENA HOLT 


YUNSEON KIM 


LAM I LEE 


SEONGSIN HONG 


SANG KIM 


SHARON LEE 


TIMOTHY HUELSKAMP 


SUSANNE KIM 


JENE LEE 


PAUL HUGHES 


HELENA KIM 


HYUNJOO LEE j 









ALEXANDER LEGER 
LAWRENCE LESTER 
ROBERT LEWIS 
EDWARD LIN 
CRISTINA LOPEZ 
JOSE LOPEZ 
JULIA LOVE 
MARGOT LUBIN 
JUSTIN LUBKIEWICZ 
PUI LUK 

BETHANY LUONGO 
KEITH MAC DONALD 
KEVIN MAC DONALD 
MELISSA MACASKILL 
SCOTT MAFFEI 
APRIL MAGUIRE 
RINA MAJMUDAR 
MATTHEW MALLOUK 
MATTHEW MALONEY 
ADAM MALONEY 
CRAIG MANGUM 
ANDREW MANNIX 
MARIAM MANSURY 
RACHEL MANZIONE 
TENG MAO 
LINDSEY MARICH 



JAKE MARSELLO 
ANNE MARTEN 
ANASTASIA MATERNOVSKAYA 
BRENT MATHEWS 
DANIEL MATULICH 
IAN MCBRIDE 
NORA MCCARRON 
BRENDAN MCCARTHY 
LINDSEYMCCLENAHAN 
KATHERINE MCDONALD 
EMILY MCGINTY 
BRIAN MCGLINCHEY 
DANIEL MCINNES 
MEGHAN MCLAUGHLIN 
MAREIKA MCLAUGHLIN 
ANDREW MCMAHON 
TERRY MCMULLEN 
PETER MEE 
KELLY MEEHAN 
KEVIN MEENAN 
ERINAMEGOWAN 
GABRIELLA MERCEDES 
RICKY MERRITT 
MATTHEW MEYER 
LEAH MIDDLETON 
CAROLYN MIESOWICZ 





ANGELA MILERIS 
ROBERT MILLER 
PASHA MIRAZIMI 
JONATHAN MISIEWICZ 
ADAM MISTLER 
MOHAMED MOHAMED 
ANTHONY MONTEIRO 
RYAN MORGAN 
RYAN MOSES 
RAFAEL MOTA 
BRIAN MUEHRCKE 
JOHN MUELLER 
JOHN MULLENHOLZ 
CHRISTOPHER MUNO 
ANNE MURPHY 
ROBERT MURRAY 
PAUL NEUBAUER 
DAVID NEYLON 
THIEN NGUYEN 
GAELLE NGUYEN 
DON NGUYEN 
DRUDYS NICOLAS 
MICHAEL NOLAN 
LINDSAY NOLAN 
MORGAN-LEIGH NORMAN 
BRENDAN O'BRIEN 







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ANN O'CONNELL 


RADHIKA PRABHU 


STEPHANIE SAYWARD 


KATHERINE O'CONNOR 


BEN PROCTOR 


MICHAEL SCHAINFELD 


MYUNG-KUHL OH 


KRISTIN PRUESER 


ELIZABETH SCHARETG 


MAI 1 HEW O'HARE 


MALCOLMN PRYOR 


EILEEN SCHEUCH 


TERRENCE O'NEILL 


SOFIA PUENTE 


ANNA SCHLEELEIN 


SARA ORR 


ELISABETH PULVERMANN 


JASON SCHUMACHER 


PEI-CHUN OU 


HARRY QUAO 


MELISSA 


JOSHUA PALMER 


CURTIS RANDALL 


SCHWARTZMANSTUBBS 


KRISTINE PALMER 


MEGHAN RAO 


SUSAN SEO 


ANDREWPARK 


SAPNA REDDY 


ANN SEXAUER 


SUNG PARK 


MARGUERITE REID 


GUILLAUME SEYNHAEVE 


HOWARD PARK 


MELISSA RICCI 


RYAN SHANNON 


ALYSON PARKER 


ASHLEY RICHARD 


RYAN SHANNON 


KARAN PATEL 


LUIS RIVERA 


SAMUEL SHAW 


RADHY PENA 


DANIEL RODRIGUEZ 


MONIKA SHAW 


ALEXANDRA PENCE 


PETER ROONEY 


KEVIN SHEPARD 


CHRISTOPHER PEREZ 


DAVID ROSENBERG 


DANIEL SHIMKO 


LAURA PETILLO 


JULIA ROSETTI 


DANIELLE SHOOT 


LANPHAM 


RYAN RUTZKE 


GEOFFREY SHUDTZ 


MARGARET PHOENIX 


DANIEL RYAN 


JAMES SHUSTER 


JAVIER PIG GEE 


CARLOS SAGARDIA 


JEREMY SILVERMAN 


BRYCE PINKHAM 


JOANNE SAGLIMBENI 


CATHERINE SIMPKINSON 


ABRAHAM PINON 


LUIS SANTIAGO 


LEANA SIOCHI 


MICHAEL PLEASANTS 


DAVID SANTOSO 


OMAR SIVORI 


CAITLIN FLETCHER 


KEVIN SANZ 


KEEGAN SKIDMORE 


BRENDAN PORATH 


RICHARD SANZO 


BRANDON SLAUGHTER 


WILLIAM POWELL 


HILARY SARGENT 


CHRISTOPHER SMITH 


ALLISON POWER 


j 11, LI AN SAVOY 


CARL SMITH 









COLIN SMYTH 

ANDREW SNOPKOWSKI 

JAMES SCARES 

JOHN SOBOLEWSKI 

ALYSA SORAN 

THOMAS SORRENTINO 

MARCELA SOSA 

LATHDA SOULATHA 

JACK SOUSA 

BRIAN SPANG 

JOSEPH SPECE 

ROBERT SPIGAI 

HARROLD ST JUSTE 

SHANNON STARCK 

ALEXANDER STEPHENS 

ANDREW STEVENSON 

ERIC STOFFEL 

RICHARD SUH 

ANAND TALWAR 

JANAYE TAYLOR 

MELINDATEIXEIRA 

JOELTEJADA 

KATHERINE THOMAS 
I COLLEEN THORNTON 
! MICHAEL TIERNAN 

CHARLES TINGUE 



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JONATHAN TONG 
ANDY TON G 
LAUREN TRABOLD 
LAP TRAN 

CHRISTOPHER TRAN 
MAUREEN TRAYNOR 
PEDRO TREBBAU 
JEREMY TRUEBLOOD 
ELIZABETH TUMOLO 
CATHERINE TUTTLE 
BRANDON TWICHELL 
OBIAGELI UKADIKE 
GLENN VALLACH 
MARJOLEIN VAN PARIDON 
ARIANA VARGAS 
ALEXANDER VASQUEZ 
CHRISTIAN VAZQUEZ 
TARA VECCHIONE 
KEVIN VETIAC 
MICHAEL VIGLIONE 
TIMOTHY VREELAND 
CALVIN VY 
SHARON WAI 
MATTHEW WALDRON 
TANISHA WALDRON 
ALEXANDER WANG 




NIDA WASEEM 
KATHRYN WATERS 
JERMAINE WATSON 
JEANNE WELSH 
KATHLEEN WICKS 
HARRY WILCOX 
ALEXWU 
INGRID WULCZYN 
DANIEL YANG 
EMILY YEOMANS 
HABTAMU YOHANNES 
JAE-WON YOON 
JAMES YOSHIMURA 
JESSICA YOUNG 
VINCENT YU 
JONATHAN YUNG 





Spninrs 



Words of Advice 

from the Class of 2005... 




* • 



"^^^gggSSSS^SS^SSK.. 



; 




"You must go abroad! I wen 
to Italy for the entire year 
and it was the best decision 
I made at BC. Being able tc 
experience another culture 
in that type of setting is an 
amazing experience. It's an 
opportunity that should be 
taken advantage of by allr 

- Marisa Brown 

"To all the freshmen, watcH 
out when you are down in the 
Mods because all the houses 
look the samer 

- Jeff Gallotta 



(Jiiity Stevens, Laina Ceddia, and Erin Docherty 

"Try to secure a job before senior 
year starts so you can have fun 
all year and not worry about what 
will happen after graduation!" 

- Rupa Kumar 





"These next few years 
will greatly affect the 
kind of person you 
will become. Approach 
5j| every new endeavor 
with an open mind and 
an open heartr 

- Matt Lawton 



"Try to go into Boston 
as much as you can 
while you*re here, 
especially if you*re not 
staying in the Boston 
area after graduation. 
You probably won*t 
realize how much you^re 
going to miss it until 
it's almost too later 

- Monica Suarez 



Senidrs enjdyin.t; their hiNt year tocerher! 




Photo courtesy of Bob McGrath 



Seniors | 



PATRONS &BENEmCTORS 

EdltedBy: 

LltidsejScardlno 

Matt&wDeibel 




.^r^. .^-^ j^ .y^j^i- . 



•s^ 






^ ^^^^^p^ he extraordinary lives we are all living while 
at Boston College would not be possible 
without immense help from parents, families, 
faculty, staff and administration. Similarly, our ability to docu- 
ment a year in the life of Boston College students in this 92"*^ 
edition of Suh Turri would not have been possible without the 
wonderful generosity of our patrons and benefactors. Their kind 
donations have allowed us to present the highest quality pub- 
lication. More importantly, their support has acted as a great 
encouragement to the Sub Turri staff and has demonstrated that 
our seemingly endless hours of hard work are appreciated. For 
these things, we extend our sincerest thanks to the men and 
women whose names appear on the following pages. Marisa ¥u?,co 



Platinum (benefactors 



David & Jana Agliano 

Blythe Argenbright 

The Billings Family 

The Billings Family 

Judy XK Gao and Kenneth Bonnet 

Joe and Ellen Bowen 

Jack & Melissa Bradley 

Bob & Kate Burke 

Dr, Yasmin Caballero 

John & Mary Anne Callahan 

Ed and Jan Caldwell 

John & Linda Carter 

Dan Ciauri 

Richard & Anne Colucci 

Timothy & Debra Connors 

Karen R Daly-Rossi 

Lydia, William & Jonathan Fabbrokeephart 

Dennis and Ann FitzSimons 

The Fleischer Family 

Martm D. Gavin '69 CGSOM 74 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph C. Grasso 

Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Grillo 

Andrea & Bart Guerreri 



Mr. & Mrs. Robert E Harper 

Richard & Helen Haydon 

Mn & Mrs. David B. Henry 

Bruce and Sue Herman 

Tom and Ginny Hughes 

Paul R. & Eileen R Hymas 

Mr. & Mrs. John W. Johnston 

Bob & Dee Jordan 

E. Michael Joye 

Lawrence & Joyce Lacerte 

Robert K. LaRocca 

Frank & Joanne Lavin 

Mary Jo & Don Layden Jr. 

Mario and Natalia Maffei 

Kathy & Bob Mahoney 

Mr. & Mrs. Aurelio Martinez 

Daniel J. Mayer MD 

Anthony & Patricia Mazzone 

Mr. And Mrs. Robert D. McNeil 






Linda and Allen Meyer 

Barry Anthony Mills, M.D. 

Mn And Mrs. Eugene J. Montrone 

Chuck & Sue Moran 

Rick and Cherie Neu 

Cathy & Robert M. O'Brien 

Brian & Maura O'Connor 

Louis A. Perrotta, M.D. 

Steven &l Kathy Pidgeon 

Tom & Sue Pohmer and Family 

Dr. Tom '80 and Cheryl Bellisimo '82 Russo, 'P08 

Patrick J. Ryan 
John P. Ryan '71 & Jeanne-Marie Dever Ryan '71 & Family 

Dr. & Mrs. Rene Rodriguez - Sains 

The Sasso Family 

James and Tomasina Schiro 

Janet &l Peter Simon 

John & Andrea Skandalis 

Mr. & Mrs. Brian Steller 

Gary & Nancy Swensen 

Therese Militana Valvano 

Mary Anne & Jim Walsh 

David and Judy Williams 

Lynda Youngworth, M.D. and Scott Wright 

Mimi C. Yu 



(^old (benefactors 

Dr. & Mrs. Brian and Kathy Aurori 

John]. Breslin 

Vince & Robyn Caponi 

Carney Family 
Peter and Leslie Ciampi 

Ray & Paula Doherty 

Jeanne & Mike Eulberg 

John & Carol Gabelli 

Kevin & Rita Gill 

The Hemak Family 

Hillman Family 

Tzu Cheg & Pheng Fan Kao 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Kincade, Sr. 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael J. Markey 

Theresa McKeever 

Mrs. Maureen Mitchell 

Bob.& Kathy Mosesian 

Mr. &L Mrs. Gerard Muldoon 

Ed & Kathy Napleton 

The Orr Family 

Gary W. Rada 

Abigail Lyn Rethore 

Dr. & Mrs. David M. Rodgers 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank J. Roney 

Melissa J. Sherman 

Saki Sugano 

Eric & Cynthia Svenson 

Christopher W. and Patricia A. Tomecek 

Mr. &. Mrs. Gilbert Vega 

Doniikl (Si FJk'n Viiolo 



Q^ilver (benefactors 



Bob and Teresa Akerblom 

Charles Asiedu 

John and Sheila Bell 

The Berg Family 

The Bertelloni Family 

Richard & Christine Bouchard 

James H. Collins, DMD 70 & Michele Plasse-CoUins 72 

James P. Conley 
Mr. & Mrs. Francis P. Crotty 

Dave and Maureen Doran 

Daniel and Kathy Druckman 

Family of Matthew Ellis '^^ 

Mr. & Mrs. Goldthwaite 

John, Mary & Sean (2006) Hanlon 

Traci Ryan Hummel 

Brian & Patty Keck 

Anonymous 

Kyu Y. Lee 

Mrs. Patricia Lister 

Donald & Kathleen Marshall 

Daniel and Faith McCready 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel McKinley 

Chris & John McLaughlin 

Chistopher (74) and Jayne (75) Mehne 

Tom & Oona Noon 

The O'Dor Family 

The O'Grady Family 

John & Patrcia Pavlov 



Mr. & Mrs. Philip Polcaro 

Tod J. Poremski, M.D. 

Susan Callaway Pratt 

Ed & Bernice Richards 

Ida M. D'Emilia - Perrault 

Vincent & Christine Sama 

Paul & Judy Switaj 

Vassallo Family 

Laura & Tom Von Ahn 

Amy & Michael Ward 

Douglas and Arlene Weeks 

Hilary Weismann 

Mark & Cheryl Wolfe 

Kent & Dotsy Zirkle 






Matrons 



Pat & Bill Ahearn 

Robert & Cheryl Amoroso 

Joan Anastasi 

Jane & Bob Anspach 

Frank & Rebecca Antonacci 

Alex and Denise Archer 

John & Joanne Arizzi 

Diana Gloria Armada 

Rod & Kathy Armstrong 

William E Arnault 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Baker 

C. Thomas & Anna Barletta 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Barlow 

Peter & Elena Barrett 

James and Lesley Barrile 

Robert & Carol Bartlett 

Proud Parents of Brian Belke 

Peter and Susan Bennett 

Richard and Bonnie Berg 

Mr. Anthony Bernardo 

Nyck Bernier (2007) 

Barbara Bertucio 

Thomas & Susan Bisanzo 

Glenn and Carole BoUes 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter M. Bonanni 

David and Kathy Bonynge 

Michael T. Bourque 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Bradley 

Christopher & Iretta Brennan 

Michael & Margaret Brennan 

Joe and Mary Jane Brink 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Brissette 

Margaret & Douglas Brown 

Mr. &. Mrs. Stanley E. Brozyna 

Samuel and Deborah Bruno 

Diego &. Marian A. Bueti 

Bill & Gail Burke 

Mr. (St Mrs. Raymond Burke 



Thomas & Cynthia Burns 

Dr. & Mrs. Giacomo J. Buscaino 

Muriel & Bill Cagney 

Nancy Calenda 

Stuart & Sandra Campbell 

Jeffrey Leverich & Leigh Ellen Caro-Leverich 

Jane & Dennis Gates 

Jay & Kit Cei 

David & Marie Chalmers 

Jung S. Chang 

James & Leslie Chapman 

James & Leslie Chapman 

Michelle & Gerry Chauvin 

David & Lorene Chellgren 

Marianne Chellgren 

Raymond and Joanne Chevallier 

Jeanette & Alvaro Cifuentes 

Bernie and Andrea Clark 

Mr. And Mrs. Thomas J. Clark 

Sharleen & Mike Cole 

Barry and Ann Connell 

Joseph and Marcia Connolly 

Claire R. Cook 

Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Corrigan, Jr. 

Kevin & Terry Coughlin 

Kevin and Donna Cronin 

Laura and Kevin Currier 

Chantal A. Curtis 

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Gushing 

James and Rosemary Daley, II 

Bob and Joanne D'Ambrosio 

Erick and Ildiko Davis 

Peter and Joanne Deleso 

Frances Dclmar 
Geraldine &. John I VTuca 

Peter A DcLuca 

Mr. (Si. Mrs. Frank Desena 

Mr. & Mrs. James Dilla\ou 



Mr. & Mrs. James DiStasio 

Mr. & Mrs. Donn C. Dolce 

John O'Connor Donley 

Kaitlyn Dowling 

Mrs. Janet Dowling Sands 

Mr. & Mrs. Driver 

Mary Lou & Wayne Dudley 

James and Barbara Dunigan 

Paul '69 & Anne Maroney Dwyer '70 

David and Judy Easterbrooks 

Nicolas & Sandra Easton 

Nancy & Ed Eder 

Mr. & Mrs. David Elliott 

Marge & Gene Elwood 

William R. Ericson 

Barbara Fabiani 

Mr. & Mrs. James E. Pagan, Jr. 

Gary and Patricia Pernando 

Ted and Carline Pontaine 

Dominick A. Portino 

Edward E & Erin L. Pox 

Mr. and Mrs. John Pridirici 

Diana and Matthew Punchion 

The Galacki Pamily 

The Gallotta Pamily 

Thomas M. and Mary M. Garvey 

Peter & Anna Marie Coady 

Kenneth And Veronica Gentile 

Patricia J. Ghaul & Richard 

John and Kathleen Gillespie 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Gillis 



Dr. & Mrs. Paul Gilman 

Kevin Gipson 

Casey Girardi 

Dr. & Mrs. Bob Coins 

Camille & Scott Goodby 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Gordon 

Roy & Donna Gosselin 

Helen and Lawrence Green 

Barbara & Peter Greenwalt 

Michael & Mary Jane Gregory 

Dennis M. Griffin MD (67) and Maura Jane Griffin (NC68) 

Grosart Pamily 

Claudia Pascale 

Phillip and Peggy Hanel 

Barbara & Tom Hanlon 

Debbie and John Harmon 

Michael Culhane Harper 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Harrington 

Kathy and Matt Hart 

Bill and Patty Hawk 

Robert & Phyllis Hayes 

Dr. & Mrs. Michael Hayman 

Robert L. & Sherrin J. Hebb 

Laura Hanlon 

Timothy and Mary Hodgens 

Stephen P. Holodak 

Eileen and David Hovey 

Sharon L. lannucci 

Peter & Laura Inserra 

Mr. & Mrs. John lorio 

Gary and Gloria Jacobson 










& 


^atwns 


St. John Family 


Courtney Bevin Madigan 


John & Glennis Jones 


Joseph B. Magnone 


Robert & Jeanne Joy 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward Maher 


The Kane Family 


Emily A. Mahony 


John & Carol Kanis 


Arlene K. Malone 


Pamela Bocchio Kaye 


James & Leah Marmon 


Pamela Bocchio Kaye 


Carl & Terri Matteo 


Mr. & Mrs. Tim Keel 


Charlie and Judy McBride 


Meeja & Kujung Kim 


Brian and Gail McCabe 


Robert R Kochel 


John T McCafferty 


Michael Korb 


David &L Jeanne McClain 


Michael Korb 


Shami & Daniel McCormick 


Barbara & Mark Koruda 


Michael & Bernadette McCormick 


John and Anne Krahnert 


Gloria G. Ybarra 


Jeffrey & Melissa Kuck 


Mr. & Mrs. Kevin McCullough Sr. 


Mr. & Mrs. John Kwiatek, 75 


William J. McGee 


Mrs. Alicja Lada and Mr. Andrzej Lada 


Jeff McPheeters 


Dr. & Mrs. Richard J. Lambert 


Angelo & Pat Messina 


Mr. & Mrs. Gilbert A. Lamonaca 


Mr. & Mrs. Christy J. Mihos 


Ashley Lane 


Barry Anthony Mills, Jr. 


Chuck '70 & Shirley Lanzieri 


Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Misasi 


Mr. & Mrs. Eugene C. Laplante . 


Euse and Sue Mita P '99 '01 '05 


Lapreziosa/Becker 


Erland Modesto 


Ernie & Helen Lareau 


Ana Maria Goicoechea 


Bradley & Barbara Lauderdale 


Min Young Moon 


Lee Dong Koo 


Mr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Mooney, Jr. 


David Lemoine & Mary Cotter - Lemoine Brad & Susan Mounsey | 


Stephen & Grace Lennon 


Jack and Jo Moynihan 


Robert & Julie Lepri 


Wilberth & Grettel Murillo 


Mr. & Mrs. Edward Lewandowski 


Chris & Linda Murphy 


The Lewis family 


Mr. & Mrs. Raymond G. Murphy 


Michael & Christine Liberti 


Tom & Ann Murray 


The Lindner Family 


John & Christine Murray 


Jane & Cliff Long 


Arnie and Cathy Nance 


The LoPresti Family 


Jeffrey and Susie Naylor 


Rosemarie <St James Lynch 


Simon & Julia Newton 


Mar>' Beth and Terry Lindsay 


Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Nolan 


Kevin & Sharon MacKenzie 


Jt)iin ani.! Jan Nouak 




t 



Louis & Rhoda Obermeier 

Thomas & Jennifer O'Brien 

Mr. & Mrs. Jerome F. O'Brien 

Elaine and John O'Brien 

Dr. & Mrs. John B. O'Connell 

Mr. And Mrs. Michael O'Leary 

Jose & Leila Oledan 

Michael & Carol Oliver 

Charles E.O'Malley( 2005) 

Erin Michelle O'Reilly 

Mark & Janis Orrico 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry W. Orvin 

Paparsenos Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Pare 

Mike & Ann Patten 

Marshall & Miriam Paul 

The Penniman Family 

Dr. & Mrs. Milton A. Perez 

Kent & Susan Perrin 

Brian and Candace Phelan 

Richard & Colleen Powers 

Jonathan Sean Rao 

Ian C. Read 

Dr. Timothy M. Reddy 

Carol Pilarski-Remis 

Ramon & Diane Reyes 

Steve and Norah Roberts 

Anonymous 

Dr. & Mrs. Rene Rodriguez - Sains 

Dr. & Mrs. Rene Rodriguez - Sains 

Mr. & Mrs. John C. Barber 

Ed & Mary Ronan 



Jim & Maggie Rountos 

Gerald & Ann Rourke 

Dr. & Mrs. Johnny B. Roy 

Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Rutolo 

Chuck and Linda Ryan 

Colm P. Ryan 

Louis and Linda Saltus 

Michelle D. Sanders 

Rosa Santis 

Steve and Mary Saunders 

Patrick & Mary Scally 

Schirling Family 

Mr. & Mrs. Scopelliti 

Heidi Seidewand 

Denis & Laure Seynhaeve 

Timothy and Karen Sheely 

Mr. & Mrs. Douglas Sherer 

Jules Shteierman, Magda J. Shteierman 

Ray Skowyra & Marianne Short 

Jerry and Betsy Smith 

Darryl R. Smith M.D. 

Dr. & Mrs. G Sonpal 

Soskin Family 

Thomas & Linda Spina 

Catherine and Charles St. Lucia 

David & Mary Stein 

Mark & Julie Steinhafel 

Susan and Kevin Steinhauer 

David & Cheryl Strassman 

Jorge M. Suro Ballester 

Ernest & Candace Sutcliffe 

Mr. & Mrs. H. Tadros 







atrons 



Mary and Fred Tarca 

In Memory of Elizabeth Largay Terenzi 

Amy Terrill 

Frank & Joanne Thoelen 

Michael & Barbara Tichenor 

Mark & Sheila Tincher 

The Tobiassen Family 

Jo Ann & Theodore Tomaszewski 

Mr. & Mrs. James R. Toth 

The Richard Tranter Family 

The Treadaway Family 

Twomey Family 

Iquo Ukpong's Mother 

Jeanmarie & John Varanelli 

Diana & Nishan Vartabedian 

Edward & Jean Vozzella 

Ingrid & Malcolm Wain 

Deborah and Samuel Watts 

Stephen & Suzanne Weiss 

Robert Williams Jr. 

Ms. Pamela Wilson & Dr. H. Michael Byrne 

Angela Windy 's Mother 

Anthony Wlodarczyk 

Buddy and Penny Wolf 

Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Wondrack 

Chung ' Shish Wong 

Mirta I. Valdes 

Refugio G. & Julia Zepeda 

Ellen Burke Zockoff (GAS 71) 

Gerard and Sarah Zopfi 





Homecoming W^eK 

-'n.////I)ecorate , 20C 



OC Season P^^i^r 







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* . . . ^ 



'^'i<a 







CLOSING 

I EdltedBy: 
MyxaChar 
MarlsciFusco 



i*ii 



rn^f 



y'^''^ ^^ apturing a year at Boston College in 504 pages 
f J is a daunting task. There are certain days that 

||teS"^^ seem like they would require 504 pages! The 

preceding pages are simply a small sampling of what it meant 
to attend Boston College in 2005. How can one accurately 
encompass what it means to he a Boston College student? For 
nearly nine months the campus is filled with unforgettable events 
that are worthy of recording, whether they include the whole 
school or just a couple of the closest of friends on a late night 
away from the cold. There are no words, there are no pictures 
that can replicate the excitement of a game at Alumni Stadium 
or Conte Forum, the energy of a orchestra or a capella concert, 
the communal understanding during the finals crunch. There- 
fore, the academics, student life, organizations, sports and senior 
moments and memories are meant not to depict everything that 
it means to he an Eagle. Rather, they are to serve as a founda- 
tion for our own distinctive stories; they should act as a spring- 
hoard for the rehashing of events for many years to come. We 
opened with advice from St. Augustine and we close with similar 
advice from Henry David Thoreau. May both serve not only as 
excellent reminders of your life at Boston College but also as 
foundations for your life to come. Is^ayisa Fusco and Myra Chai 




or (Boston 



For Boston, For Boston, 
We sing our proud refrain! 

For Boston, For Boston, 
'Tis Wisdom's earthly fane. 

For here all are one 

And their hearts are true 

And the towers on The Heights 

Reach to Heav'n's own blue. 

For Boston, For Boston, 

Till the echoes ring again! 

For Boston, For Boston, 

Thy glory is our own! 

For Boston, For Boston, 

'Tis here that Truth is known! 



And ever with the Right 

Shall thy heirs be found 

'Tis time shall be no more 

And thy work is crown'd. 

For Boston, For Boston, 

For Thee and Thine alone! 






Q^ a ill Alma OMaterl 



Hail! Alma Mater! 

Thy praise we sing. 

Fondly thy mem'ries 

'Round our hearts still cling. 

Guide of our youth, 

Through thee we shall prevail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 

Hail! All Hail! 

Lo! on the Heights, 

Proudly thy tow'rs raised for the Right. 

God is thy master, 

His law thy sole avail! 

Hail! Alma Mater! 
Hail! All Hail! 






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The Foundations of 

SUB TURRI 



luhe 200S eJilwii ofQ&iih ''Ciirri luxs beoi, i)i iinriip waps, it faiuiJitUoii ofsorls. 'Tljlie beijiiiiiiihj oflhe pear SlTw the nhijor reiiova- 
tioii of our office, two new (3.'Jitoi-lii-&hief assiinioJ their posiUoiis, the staff was niaiiilp comprised of new members, aiiJ the layoiil 
of the book chaiiijedas well ''Che chaiiifes reflect a cjrowth on the part of tlie publication, which hopes in ererp wap to be better than 
ever before ^astlp, this book would not have been possible without the time and effort of those whose names appear on this pappe 
''Ohroucjh countless hours they hare strired to put out a sO^pacfe publication that rel lects the best of their creativity and passion. 



&0 -(Editors Q§^// (?///^Myra Chai and Marisa Fusco 

cWatiacfincj (3i.Jttoi- Jessica Lee 

^hotoijniphp (3i.Jiicv: Heather Page 

(Justness (SLJitcv: Lindsey Scardino 

A.ssistant (^usitiess oM'ixnacper/Q^ehstte ^esiijnev: Matthew Deibel 

oWarketlittj Oiia/tacfet; Suzanne Guerreri 



A,Cixdemtcs 

Kathleen Ahearn, Editor 

Carolyn Dorazio, Editor 

Samantha Fontellio 

QS)tiid6}it ^tfe 

Elizabeth Ethun, Editor 

Nhu Huynh, Editor 

Annie Lu, Photo Manager 

Kerri Clark 

Lara Philipps 

Q&ports 

Claire Markham, Editor 

Katherine Modzelewski, Editor 

Aubrey Timm, Editor 



©tg'aiiisaUoiis 

Dori Miller, Organizations 

Vy Vy Vo, Organizations 

Annie Chor, Photo Manager 

Q^eiiiars 

Erin Klewin, Seniors 

Rochelle Schneider, Seniors 

Veronica Korb 

^h0l0 

Christopher Brown 

Julie Burgess 

Katie Earrell 

Angela Kim 

Melissa Koski 

Andrew Logan 

Heather Matheson 

Carolyn Ward 



&bpp 

Pamela Harvey 

Alicia True 

(business 

Mark Armeno 

Ashwinder Dhillon 

Joseph Dolginow 

Natalie Fogiel 
Inna Shaykevich 

cM'arketiHpf 
Kelly Kross 







Siih Tiirri 



■F^*^ 



•^""i^m 



^mamt 



A. c a demies 



6h-(3iJit0r 



&b-(S^dit0r 



"Do you know who I am? 1 don't know how to put 
this, hut.. .I'm kind of a hig deal. People know me." 
Really? No, not really. Huge thanks to Kat— 1 couldn't 
have asked for a better co-editor.. .you rock! Thanks 
to Myra and Marisa for being awesome editors in 
chief and for all the delicious food! And for those of 
you who didn't notice. Academics is definitely the 
coolest section. 

Congrats to my senior friends!! I'll leave you all with 
some words of wasdom from my favorite show, Sein- 
feld: 

"You know, Elaine, very often we cannot see the for- 
est tor the trees." 
"Yeah, I don't know what that means." 



J5f 



So when I received my application for Sub Turri for the 
second time this summer 1 thought, maybe it wouldn't 
hurt to sign up for a club where I was actually making a 
commitment that would force me to DO something with 
my free time. Have to admit I had reservations, yearbook 
in high school took up my life, there were laughs, cries, 
and even a few good slaps (it was four girls tied up in an 
office smaller than ANY dorm room.) My experience this 
year however was far more enjoyable. Sub Turri gave me 
the opportunity to meet a bunch of awesome girls, and 
to work together to create something that we are all truly 
proud of The Academic Section isn't exactly the most 
popular or most exciting section of the book but we gave 
it all we had. Carolyn thanks so much for working with 
me this year, not only were you a great co-editor, but a 
good friend. Marissa & Myra, thanks for all your help and 
guidance, you guys put together an awesome staff and an 
amazing book. So anyway, I hope you all enjoy and if you 
don't. ..Carolyn did everything, it was all her I swear! 



^^tudent ^ife 



\ &0'(S^dit0r 

1 wanted to simply turn in a drawing of a stick fig- 
ure of myself, but 1 couldn't so instead it's just words. 
Nhu is the best person ever. I remember when I was 
a freshmen on the staff, and I was the one who did 
all the work, so it could be that that's just how it goes 
in the natural order of things. But in this case, that 
is not the case. I was a lazy senior, and Nhu was just a 
good editor. Anyway, we bonded though, over differ- 
ent cultural histories, random food we found around 
the office, and just because we were awesome. Our 
staff was awesome too. Ya'U rock. I'm also from 
Texas, and that rocks too. The editors in chief totally 
rocked this year as well. Marisa and Myra, ya'll were 
great! So thanks to everyone. Have a great year next 
year and I'll see ya'll later! :) 



&0 -(Editor 

I would like to thank my co-editor, Elizabeth Ethun, stu- 
dent life staff - Alicia True, Kerri Clark, Lara Philipps, 
and Annie Lu, and EIC's Marisa Fusco and Myra Chai 
for such an excellent year. I would like to acknowledge 
that despite the slower than a sloth computer, and stu- 
pid printer, the Student Life section managed to create 
some kick ass spreads. I thank and love my parents and 
my boyfriend, Junho "the Gangsta squared" Hong, for 
their support. Sht)ut out to the nine hundred people in 
my family. Ding Dong, Dt)n, Wayne, Tia, and Ton. Nail 
Top in G-Burg, hollah. And the ola of love, lots ot love. 
Mad love to Symphony Sushi, Caterpillar Maki, and 
GYE Yearbook Camp, yea that's right. Down with the 
system, up with Perspectives. 1 miss my Honda Accord. 
I wish the dining hall had more rice, and le.ss chicken. 
Shout Out to Burtonsville, MD and drive-thru Star- 
bucks. Lastly, thanks to my roommates and Cheverus, 
who take the best pictures. Shout to Lee Pellegrini and 
Mr. Hecht tor proviJin^ mc intormatinn anJ pictures to u>c 
in the spreads. 



wmm 



(S>r^ani^ati0ns 

'^arothp oMiller Q^ Q^ Q^ 

6h-(S^dit0r &b-(S^dit0r 



I can't believe that this year is ahnost over. As an editor 
of the Organizations section, I had NO idea how much 
work would be going into this book. From emailing, to 
calling, to handing out flyers, the organizations have 
definitely been difficult to get in touch with. 1 want to 
thank my co-editor, Vy Vy, for all the late hours she put 
in and the beautiful pages she has made. You've done an 
EXCELLENT job! Of course, I'd also like to thank Myra 
and Marisa for being so understanding and helpful to me 
and each staff member. Good Luck to all the Seniors! 



Organizations is without a doubt the most difficult section 
in the yearbook. However, I have for the most part enjoyed 
the experience as a freshman. Thank you to my co-editor 
Dori for making the endless phone calls and hunting down 
every club with me. I also want to thank the Sub Turri staff, 
especially Myra and Marisa for putting up with me and for 
always understanding. I couldn't have done it without you. 
Even at the point of freaking out, I continued to put those 
hours in like it was my job, but I definitely enjoyed being a 
part of Sub Turri. To all my friends at BC, you all are what 
keeps me going here. Thanks for the many laughs and good 
times, which I'm sure there are many more to come. To 
my family and friends from home, thank you for keeping 
me sane and for all your support. I miss and love you all. 

"Though miles may lie between us, we're never far apart, for 
friendshipdoesn't count the miles, it's measuredby the heart." 



&0-(S^dit0r 

.'d like to thank everyone on the Sub 
Furri staff, especially Myra and Marisa, 
or making my first year on yearbook so 
;njoyable. It has beeii amazing to work on 
;uch a friendly and talented staff. I'd also 
ike to thank Aubrey and Claire for being 
imazing co-editors. Long hours in the Sub 
Furri office were always interesting, but 
ve somehow managed to pull everything 
ogether in the end. Even it it meant I 
aad to come all the way from Newton for 
1 1 5 minute meeting, it was a lot of fun 
md a great experience for my freshman 
ear. I'd also like to thank my parents and 
brother for always being there for me and 
iupporting me in everything 1 do. And 
inally, thanks to all of my amazingly sup- 
lortive friends here at BC and at home. 



Q$)p0rts 

&Lim oMktkham 
&0-(S^dit0r 

Thanks to Myra and Marisa for all the help, 
encouragement, and, above all, the patience. 
Katie and Aubrey — you were so dedicated 
and so talented, 1 learned a lot about yearbook 
from the two of you and I would have never 
survived without everything you did. The 
teams got all the recognition they deserved 
because of you two — 1 know this year was 
only the start of an amazing time at BC for 
both of you. For the ladies of Walsh 224, 
there aren't enough words to say how much 
I love you girls. We are, and will always be, 
wholly inappropriate and loving it. Finally, 
thaiiks to everyone in Chi-town — Kyle most 
especially — for enduring the late night phone 
calls when deadlines were swiftly approaching. 
Here's to beautiful memories and bright 
futures — Best of luck to the class of 2005! 



&0'(S^dit0r 

I have had a wonderful experience this 
year on the Sub Turri staff. 1 feel lucky to 
have joined such a productive and well 
organized club as a freshman. I would like 
to thank Myra and Marisa for giving me 
the opportunity to be a Sports Editor. You 
have done a fabulous job and should be 
very proud of this hook! Thank you to Ka- 
tie and Claire for being the best co-editors 
ever. You girls really stepped up to the plate 
and made our section great. I am looking 
forward to future collaboration with you. 
Thank you to my parents for your sup- 
port and sending me to BC. Also, thank 
you to all my friends here. We may have 
only known each other for half a year, 
but I know our friendship will last much 
longer. Thanks for all of the great times! 




P^^^!81P«WW*Wlf" 



Q^eniors 

(3irm (^lewin (^ochelle Q^chneider 



&h-(S^dit0r 



Working on the Senior section this year has been such 
a great experience for me and so much fun! Having the 
largest section to work on has been tough at times, from 
collecting candids to getting quotes, hut it has all been 
worth it, and I could never have done it without my awe- 
some co-editor! Rochelle, thanks so much for working so 
hard to make this section great and for being a great friend, 
I am going to miss you so much next year! Thanks also to 
Marisa and Myra for doing a fantastic job running every- 
thing this year and for being such great editors to work 
with, not to mention chat with in the office. Always many 
thanks to my amazing family, for always supporting and 
encouraging me in all that 1 do , and to all of my friends, 
both at BC and home, tor giving me many reasons to smile! 



&b '(Editor 



Working on the yearbook with such a great group of 
people has been one of the best experiences I've had 
at Boston College. I've made some good friends, and 
I'm sad to leave everybody! To Erin, I hope you have 
as much fun with the yearbook in the next two years 
as we did these past two years. To Marisa, I'm going to 
miss gossiping with you in our lovely, clean office. And 
to Myra, you're insane for doing everything that you do, 
but that's what I love about you! Keep in touch, girls! 
I would also like to say "HI!" to all of my friends! Can 
you believe we're graduating already? From the people I 
met on my first day here back in Keyes North to everyone 
else I've met throughout the years, each one of you has 
made my time here at Boston College that much better. 
It's been a fantastic four years, and I wish you all — as 
well as the rest of my fellow graduates - the best of luck! 
"Forget regret, or life is yours to miss. No other road. 
No other way. No day but today." - Jonathan Larson 



(Syditor 




(Jessica <^66 

First and foremost, Sub Turri, we're done! Myra and Marisa, 
you guys were the best EICs ever. The "thank yous" should 
come next, because without these people here, my tir^r 
semester probably would've consisted of lone late-nigh i 
food runs and crying over exams on my own. The '08 girh 
- dramas and bubble teas, hoys and shopping - and the 'CS 
guys, 3 more long and enjoyable years to come. The 1705 
boys - thanks for including me in your nightly fiascos and 
making me feel like the "6''' roommate." Edmond's guys, 
we loved yt)ur oven and the rest of KSA, you guys made 
freshman year awesome. To my roomie and Rcj, you guys 
made dorm-life just that much more bearable. So here's 
my rribLitc to the past year and a noi.1 lo the ^'^vm to come. 



"Ik' kind, tor everyt)ne you meet is fighting a harder battle" 



- riato 




usiness 




^naaer 



I cannot believe that tour years have come and gone so 
quickly. The memories made and friendships formed will 
last a lifetime. I'd like to thank the 2005 Business Staff 
(the best yet) for all their help this year. To my fellow 2005 
graduates, I would like to wish you all the best of luck and 
much happiness and success in all your future endeavors! 



(Website sc 




ustn6ss 

I wasn't like every other kid, you know, who dreams about 
being an astronaut, I was always more interested in what 
bark was made out of on a tree. Richard Gere's a real hero 
of mine. Sting. Sting would be another person who's a 
hero. The music he's created over the years, 1 don't re- 
ally listen to it, but the fact that he's making it, I respect 
that. I care desperately about what I do. Do I know what 
product I'm selling? No. Do I know what I'm doing today? 
No. But I'm here, and I'm gonna give it my best shot. 
Thanks everybody for making my first year a blast, especially 
Myra (who never sleeps, spends her life doing yearbook and 
a dozen other things), Marisa (who has nothing better to 
do with her life except dedicate it to yearbook) and Lindsay 
(who teaches me everything). Looking forward to next year. 



(graduate intern 



I've truly enjoyed the past two years working with the 
yearbook. Having never worked with a yearbook before, 
jumping in as the grad intern for the yearbook was a 
potentially daunting prospect, but I was welcomed with 
open arms. Thank you Marisa and Myra for all your won- 
derful work as EICs. Lindsey, it's been great working with 
you this year and getting to know you better. Mer, thank 
you for being such a wonderful supervisor and friend. To 
all of the Sub Turri staff, it's been great getting to know 
you during my office hours. I wish all of you the best of 
luck and success in your continued time at Boston Col- 
lege, and in your lives afterwards. I leave you with some 
words of advice on the meaning of success in one of my 
favorite poems by Ralph Waldo Emerson. Please take these 
words to heart as you try to find your own success iii life. 



To laugh often and much; 

to win the respect of intelligent people 

and the affection of children; 
to earn the appreciation of honest critics 

and endure the betrayal of false friends; 
to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; 
to leave the world a bit better, 

whether by a healthy child, 

a garden patch 

or a redeemed social condition; 
to know everi orie life has breathed easier 

because you have lived 
This is to have succeeded. 
- Ralph Waldo Emerson 





-///- 



oMarisa (^usco 

It I had to pick one thing that Suh Turri has taught me it is that you have to 
expect the best and prepare for the worst and hopefully the end product will 
be closer to the former. I am exceptionally proud of this book and what we 
have done throughout the year. Though there were certainly ups and downs, and 
sometimes more downs than ups, the outcome was a yearbook that, in my humble 
opinion, will stand the test of time and 1 am extremely grateful for being a part of it. 

To the 2005 staff of Sub Turri, a million thanks are owed to you. 
Being a first year EIC on a college yearbook is a daunting task to say the 
very least and I appreciate your support, enthusiasm and tremendous 
dedication. You should all be very proud of what you have done. 

Myra, you never cease to amaze me. You are perhaps the most talented 
and energetic person 1 have ever known. Thank you for being a great friend 
to endure the insanity with. From battle scars on our first days as ElCs to font 
issues to gossiping to 17 hour days in the office, we have certainly been through 
a lot together. This book would not have been what it is without your hard 
work. Thank you for everything, especially for finalizing everything while 1 
was in Belfast. You are amazing and the foundations have certainly been laid 
for a wonderful friendship. By the way, what are we going to do next year?? 

Taylor, Lizabeth and Jay, life at BC simply wouldn't be the same without 
you. Thank you for all your encouragement, for listening to me complain, for 
understanding why I couldn't spend more time with you and, most importantly, 
for always making me laugh. I couldn't ask for better friends or better excuses 
not to do work. I love you girls! To all my other amazing friends at BC and 
elsewhere, you are my strength. Each and every orie of you brightens my life 
whenever you are a part of it and for that I am eternally thankful. To my family, 
I did it! Sometimes that meant that I lost touch and sometimes it meant that we 
drove each other nuts even with many miles between us but I can only hope that 
the outcome, this book and my yet-to-be determined future, makes you proud. 

And Matthew, it is truly impossible to give you proper thanks in a few short 
sentences but I take comfort in the fact that you understand me and understand 
that you enrich my life mind, body and spirit every single day. You are amazing 
and my life as it is would not be possible without your unwavering faith in me and 
in our relationship. I love you more than I have ever found the way to say to you. 




A- 



tfti^' 



{ 




(S^ditor-in- &hief 
oMpra &hai 

It's hard to believe that it's been an entire school year since the debacle 
that was the Sub Turri office in late August and now after a seemingly 
bigger and cleaner room yet another yearbook has been published. 

To Marisa. I can't believe we pulled this thing off. How are we honestly going 
to one-up this one? Maybe next year we should hit up Lower again over some froyo 
and brain storm some ridiculous themes and then, BAM, next thing you know, it'll be 
the best thing EVER - again. It's remarkable how well we got along. . .can you imagine 
that 1 7'hour shift if we didn't? By the time you read this, you'll already be in Belfast, 
so I hope the last couple of months have been amazing. I know I'm going to miss our 
daily chats and daily rants, but I'll deal. If not, you'll be getting a lot of emails. 

To the staff. You guys were fabulous. I seriously couldn't have asked for a better 
and funnier group. The deadlines were hard but the late night/early morning freak 
attacks and my perpetual life in the office were worth it. Thanks for enduring the long 
hours and my freak attacks. I hope you're as proud of this book as I am and know that 
none of this could have been possible without the combined effort of everyone on staff 

On behalf of M ^ 2 : To Mer, thank you for all the advice and guidance during our 
weekly meetings. To Susan, the answering machine would have certainly exploded 
without you. And Peter, you were absolutely amazing this past year. This book would 
iiot have been possible without your countless hours working with Marisa and I. 

To Katharine, Cara, Beth, Megan, and Asia. What can I say, it's been an 
incredible two years and there are so many memories I don't even know where to 
begin. Thanks for listening to me rant about orgo and stalkers, for preserving my 
sanity, for smacking me dowii when I tried to join another club, for making me 
laugh, and for just always being there for me. Welch 214 time was a bit limited 
this year, but the times we spent together were amazing/ridiculous. Love you guys 
so much! To the rest of my amigos at BC, from 4Boston, Appalachia, Ghana, SAP, 
Dance Marathon, and everywhere else, I wouldn't be where I am today if it wasn't 
for you. Lunch dates, orgo bashing fests, O'Connor laughs, etc., it was all worth 
it 100 times over. To my LA'ers, you guys mean everything to me. What would 
I do honestly do without your perpetual smackdowns? And finally to my family. 
Thank you for keeping nae humble, for checking up on me when I disappear off the 
face of the earth, and for being supportive of everything (well, almost) that I do. 

So that's it. I hope you've enjoyed this book as much as we did creating it. 







uSSS 




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The Foundation 
2005 AT 



BOSTON COLLEGE 



So what was the launching point 
of the year for you? Was it the 
way you stood outside Copley 
Square on a cold November night and 
waited for the election results? Was 
it the way you stared incredulously 
at the more than fifty-one iriches of 
snow that fell in Boston before you 
madly dashed outside and swam in 
it? Was it the way you believed in a 
Sean Williams "block" party and later 
stormed Conte after the Syracuse game ? 

When we think about it, 
2005 cannot be attributed 
to just one event, one 
launching point, it was something 
more. More than any other year in 
the city's recent history the country 
and the world focused on Boston. 
Kerry's presidential run and the 
Democratic National Convention 
brought thousands to American's 
historical city. We believed in the 
Red Sox made a country believe and, 
admit it, laughed and cried after that 
classic Nike commercial. Crowded 
around a TV with our closest friends 
we rushed Lower then Kenmore 
Square. We watched the beginning 
of a Patriots dynasty and watched 
our own dynasty in the making. Can 
you remember the last time Conte 
Forum sold out for a basketball game? 
We dreamt Shakespeare through 
vibrant color and quotes. Democrats 



and Republicans alike, we listened to 
Howard Dean. And then we brought 
it back home and voted for our next 
UGBC President and Vice President. 

The year itself brought about 
significant changes. Fixed 
prices for salads and frozen 
yogurt sparked complaints, but as 
the signs in the dining halls proudly 
stated, we never knew how much 
a salad would cost from day to 
day. Plans for the Brighton campus 
officially began as a variety of options 
ranging from graduate housing and 
extra parking to new administrative 
buildings and a student center to take 
its place were tossed around. A new 
Philippines service trip marked the 
farthest country a school-sponsored 
trip has ever ventured. And finally 
students pushed harder and harder for 
a new Ethnic Studies major while the 
Asian Studies program added higher 
level courses in Chinese for students. 

As Seniors left their second 
home, they hoped to focus less 
on the tragedy of 9/11 that 
brought them together freshmen year 
and more on the renewed hopes for 
peace, the hopes for an even greater 
BC than the one they first came to. 
They embarked forward and worked 
for bigger causes than they'd ever 
known but remembered too that it was, 
always, always for Boston. Myra Chai 




Cln.sing 



Ghlophon 



The 2005 Sub Turri, Volume 93, was printed by Jostens Printing and Publishing in Winston-Salem, NC. The representative was Peter Greer and the 
Creative Accountsjvlanager was Rick Brooks. The book, "Foundations," was a 504'page Spring publication with a press run of 2100 copies. The publish- 
ing cost of the book was approximately $140,000. TTie book sold for $80 until March and $85 after, shipping and handling included. 
The office of Sub Turri is located at 103 McElroy Commons, Chestnut Hill, MA, 02467. The office phone number is (617) 552-3493 and the emai 
Jdress. is subturri@bc.edu. The website can be found at http://www.bc.edu/subturri. 
.■\11 clubs and organizations were allowed to submit descriptions and photos. Each group was allotted equal space with the exception ot the largest groups 
on campus. Various Current Events photos were reprinted with permission from the Associated Press. All photos from the History section were taken 
from archived Sub Turri volumes. 

The staff would like to extend its deepest gratitude to the following individuals for their help and support during the production of the 2005 book 
Peter Greer for his tireless enthusiasm and wealth of knowledge, Sandy Moses for her patience and understanding throughout proofs and submissions 
Bob McGrath for his wonderful portrait and student life photos arid the tasty snacks, Erin and Isabel of McGrath Studios for their kindness and treats 
throughout the fall, Rick Brooks for yet another year of beautiful artwork, Mer Zovko for her moral support and guidance in and out of yearbook, and 
Susan Chudd for her help with the Business staff. Additionally this book would not have been possible without the generous donations of the Platinum 
Gold, and Silver benefactors and patrons. 



Design 



The cover and endsheets were designed by Rick Brooks of Jostens' Creative 
accounts with assistance from the Editors- in-Chief and Peter Greer. All 
other designs were created by the Sub Turri staff using Adobe InDesign 
2.0.2 and Adobe Photoshop CS. 

The cover uses High Gloss Litho 478 base material printed in True Life 
Color and grained with "Pebble" with an overall Matte OPP UV applica- 
tion. Photos were taken by Bob McGrath and treated in Photoshop CS by 
.Vlyra Chai. Theme and date are AYTKendall Script, embossed and screened 
with Gold #327. Spine is Goudy Old Style, embossed and screened in Gold 
#327. The Cornerstone is embossed, fully modeled to different'levels and 
silkscreened to register using a special mix stone color to create a 3D effect. 
Photos in the History sections were treated by Myra Chai using Photoshop 
CS. The folio was created in Photoshop under the guidance of Peter Greer 
'and incorporates the cornerstone of the oldest building on campus. The 
opening two signatures were printed on 100 true dull stock paper with gloss 
UV coating on photos. The remainder of the book is printed on 80 dull 
stock paper and sewn using sixteen page signatures rounded, backed, and 
bounded with black on black headbands. Endsheets were printed in Warm 
Gray 403 on Cottonwood using cornerstones from the cover. 



Photography 



The Sub Turri photography staff took all photographs unless otherwise indi- 
cated. McGrath Studios, Inc. 8 Elm St., Suite 2, Braintree, MA, 02184, 
took all senior portraits. McGrath Studios was contracted by Boston Col- 
lege to be the official photographer for the 2005 Sub Turri. 
Photos were taken using a variety of cameras and lenses manufactured by 
Nikon, Canon, Quantum, Sony, and Mamiya. These include Nikon D70, 
Nikon Dl, Nikon N75, Nikon N90S, and Sony CD Mavica. 
Bob McGrath and Myra Chai took Opening, Closing and Divider page 
photographs. All images are the exclusive property of the Sub Turri and 
may not be reproduced without prior written consent. 



Color & Spot Color 

There are 19 color multiples in the book. Spot colors vary by section. 
Cover: Duotone converted to Process, Black and Pantone 499, 26.3, 
40%; History: Desaturate and Saturation 27; Maroon: 41% Cyan, 100% 
Magenta, 92% Yellow, 51% Black; Gold: 0% Cyan, 18% Magenta, 83% 
Yellow, 0% Black. 



Typography and Graphics 

All body copy is I2pt. Goudy Old Style. Captions are 8pt. Old Style and 
photo and copy credits arc 8pt. Old Style Italic. Tlie folio section names 
and number are lOpt. Goudy Old Style. Headlines vary by section: 
Opening, Closing: AYT Kendall Script 
Dividers: AYT Lynn 
Academics: Tumoil 
*rgani2ati(jns: AYT Return To Earth 
' nt Life: AYT Hedgehog 
: AYT Cornell 
~ eniors: AYT Cornell 
1 >enefactors; Goudy Old iiyn.- i 



Copyright Information 

The 2005 Sub Turri is copyrighted to Myra Chai and Marisa Fusco. No 
portion of this publication may be reproduced without the prior written 
consent of Sub Turri.